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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Vladlena Benson, Jean-Noel Ezingeard and Chris Hand

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood by research. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how purchase intention is affected by…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood by research. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how purchase intention is affected by social media user traits, cognitive factors (such as perceived control and trust) and individual beliefs, such as risk propensity and trustworthiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose and empirically test a model of purchase intention on social platforms. The study of over 500 active social media users finds the links between risk propensity, trust, technical efficacy and perceived control and explores the moderating effect of age and gender.

Findings

Purchase intention on social platforms is influenced by demographic factors, cognitive factors and beliefs. Both age and gender moderate the effects of beliefs and cognitive factors: age is a determinant of purchase intention for men, while beliefs are significant for younger women and cognitive factors are significant for older women.

Research limitations/implications

This study involved a cross-sectional design via online survey of social networking users. Gender differences in purchase intentions are found which are, in turn, influenced by age. Further empirical testing of social purchase intention could include less experienced users or non-users.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide guidance for SNS providers and technology developers in social networking commerce in terms of the different drivers of purchase intention.

Originality/value

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood. The study shows that purchase intention antecedents vary between genders and age groups of users. The identified connection between users’ perceptions of social networking sites (SNS) usage of personal information and purchase behaviour has an impact on the likelihood of user engagement in social transactions.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Michael Morrell and Jean‐Noël Ezingeard

For over a decade large companies have turned to supply‐chain management and inter‐organisational system‐development techniques to increase their efficiency and…

Abstract

For over a decade large companies have turned to supply‐chain management and inter‐organisational system‐development techniques to increase their efficiency and effectiveness. Smaller companies, however, have struggled to adopt and benefit from such systems, traditionally citing reasons such as a lack of financial resources and technical capability. This paper seeks to identify a framework of key variables which influence the adoption of inter‐organisational and supply‐chain systems with particular reference to smaller companies. This framework is then applied to a supply‐chain case study in the chemicals sector to consider the reality of system adoption for a small‐ to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) in the chain. The paper concludes that significant benefits are indeed attainable for the SME; however, a culturally‐rooted lack of vision and awareness are restricting adoption and the realisation of benefits associated with such systems.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Edward Truch, Jean‐Noel Ezingeard and David W. Birchall

The diversity and sometimes‐sporadic nature of research in the area of knowledge management (KM) points towards the need for a better understanding of the underlying…

Abstract

The diversity and sometimes‐sporadic nature of research in the area of knowledge management (KM) points towards the need for a better understanding of the underlying framework of issues and potential research topics. This paper describes the search for a research agenda in this fast developing area. Important issues were identified through a general review of the KM literature followed by a survey of business practitioners, consultants and academics at a one‐day conference dedicated to the subject. The investigation was carried out in the context of a feasibility study for a proposed KM Centre at Henley Management College in the UK. The survey followed an interpretivist approach employing open‐ended questions that sought to establish important issues in KM and to examine the benefits that participants would seek from a such a forum of practitioners and academics. A conceptual framework of disciplines and key topics was developed from the literature review and applied to the issues identified in the survey. The results point towards three areas of significant interest, namely: (i) implementation issues, (ii) best practice, and (iii) measurement. Additionally, the nature of the fast evolving field of knowledge management points to the need for more interactive research that brings together the different players in the field into a tighter and faster learning cycle.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2007

Jean‐Noël Ezingeard, Elspeth McFadzean and David Birchall

The paper seeks to investigate how the information assurance (IA) efforts of organisations should be aligned with their business strategy. From this analysis, a conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to investigate how the information assurance (IA) efforts of organisations should be aligned with their business strategy. From this analysis, a conceptual model of alignment is presented. This framework shows several organisational factors that can influence alignment.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of published works on alignment are discussed in order to develop a conceptual model of IA fit. In addition, Venkatraman's six perspectives of alignment are used as a framework to suggest future research in this area.

Findings

The paper presents a definition of information assurance and proposes various reasons why IA is a strategic issue and should be aligned with both IT and corporate strategy. From the literature, a conceptual model illustrating the variables that can influence alignment is presented.

Research limitations/implications

A clear conceptualisation of alignment is needed. Six potential research models and associated research questions are proposed.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with a number of management and research implications. In looking at the implications for managers, it is argued that any alignment framework should include adequate metrics for checking the strategic fit on a continuous basis.

Originality/value

This paper is an initial attempt to fulfil an identified gap in the literature, namely the lack of research undertaken on IA and corporate strategy alignment. It offers practical help for management so that they can improve the fit between IA and business strategy. It also offers several avenues of potential future research using Venkatraman's six perspectives of fit.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Jean‐Noel Ezingeard and Peter Race

The application of just‐in‐time manufacturing techniques in batchchemical processing environments, under conditions of variable demand,imposes significant capacity…

Abstract

The application of just‐in‐time manufacturing techniques in batch chemical processing environments, under conditions of variable demand, imposes significant capacity management problems. Making decisions which involve levels of customer service and resource untilization can be aided by the application of the calculation methodology outlined, which uses standard spreadsheet techniques and forecast queue analysis. Presents a case example to clarify the links between service levels and resource utilization which can aid management decisions regarding timing, levels of stocks and sizing of facilities.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 15 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Elspeth McFadzean, Jean‐Noel Ezingeard and David Birchall

Information security is becoming increasingly more important as organisations are endangered by a variety of threats from both its internal and external environments. Many…

Abstract

Purpose

Information security is becoming increasingly more important as organisations are endangered by a variety of threats from both its internal and external environments. Many theorists now advocate that effective security policies should be created at senior management level. This is because executives are able to evaluate the organisation using a holistic approach as well as having the power to ensure that new systems and procedures are implemented in a timely manner. There is, however, a continuing lack of understanding regarding the strategic importance of managing information security. In addition, there is a gap in the literature on the relationship between directors and information security strategy. This paper attempts to close this gap by exploring how directors perceive their organisation's security and what factors influence their decisions on the development and implementation of information security strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on constructivist grounded theory. Forty‐three interviews were conducted at executive level in 29 organisations. These interviews were then coded and analysed in order to develop new theory on directors' perception of risk and its effect on the development and implementation of information security strategy.

Findings

The analysis shows that senior managers' engagement with information security is dependent on two key variables: the strategic importance of information systems to their organisation and their perception of risk. Additionally, this research found that these two variables are affected by both organisational contextual factors and the strategic and operational actions undertaken within the business. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the two board variables also have an impact on the organisation's environment as well as its strategic and operational actions. This paper uses the data gathered from the interviews to develop a model of these factors. In addition, a perception grid is constructed which illustrates the potential concerns that can drive board engagement.

Practical implications

The paper illustrates the advantages of using the perception grid to understand and develop current and future information security issues.

Originality/value

The paper investigates how organisational directors perceive information security and how this perception influences the development of their information security strategy.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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