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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2019

Massimo Migliorini, Jenny Sjåstad Hagen, Jadranka Mihaljević, Jaroslav Mysiak, Jean-Louis Rossi, Alexander Siegmund, Khachatur Meliksetian and Debarati Guha Sapir

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how, despite increasing data availability from a wide range of sources unlocks unprecedented opportunities for disaster risk…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how, despite increasing data availability from a wide range of sources unlocks unprecedented opportunities for disaster risk reduction, data interoperability remains a challenge due to a number of barriers. As a first step to enhancing data interoperability for disaster risk reduction is to identify major barriers, this paper presents a case study on data interoperability in disaster risk reduction in Europe, linking current barriers to the regional initiative of the European Science and Technology Advisory Group.

Design/methodology/approach

In support of Priority 2 (“Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk”) of the Sendai Framework and SDG17 (“Partnerships for the goals”), this paper presents a case study on barriers to data interoperability in Europe based on a series of reviews, surveys and interviews with National Sendai Focal Points and stakeholders in science and research, governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations and industry.

Findings

For a number of European countries, there remains a clear imbalance between long-term disaster risk reduction and short-term preparation and the dominant role of emergency relief, response and recovery, pointing to the potential of investments in ex ante measures with better inclusion and exploitation of data.

Originality/value

Modern society is facing a digital revolution. As highlighted by the International Council of Science and the Committee on Data for Science and Technology, digital technology offers profound opportunities for science to discover unsuspected patterns and relationships in nature and society, on scales from the molecular to the cosmic, from local health systems to global sustainability. It has created the potential for disciplines of science to synergize into a holistic understanding of the complex challenges currently confronting humanity; the Sustainable Development Goals are a direct reflectance of this. Interdisciplinary is obtained with integration of data across relevant disciplines. However, a barrier to realization and exploitation of this potential arises from the incompatible data standards and nomenclatures used in different disciplines. Although the problem has been addressed by several initiatives, the following challenge still remains: to make online data integration a routine.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

137

Abstract

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Jean‐Louis Peaucelle and Cameron Guthrie

The aim is to identify Henri Fayol's motivations as an accomplished business manager to publish his management theory at the age of 75.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim is to identify Henri Fayol's motivations as an accomplished business manager to publish his management theory at the age of 75.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors retrace Henri Fayol's private life using primary sources from various French public archives including civil registry records, military and diplomatic archives, schooling records, publications from learned associations and inheritance declarations. They then use a psychological theory, namely equity theory, to interpret this new information about Fayol's private life and construct an explanation of his efforts to theorise his management experience.

Findings

Henri Fayol's schooling and his father's military career respectively influenced his perception of mathematics teaching in management training and the functioning of the army. His motivation to found a science of management was not financial but instead most probably a response to the obstacles his father encountered during his career.

Research limitations/implications

It is rarely known what motivates a manager to collaborate with specialists in management science. This research into Henri Fayol's motivations can be replicated for other managers.

Practical implications

The paper dentifies one major practical implication for managers who wish to contribute to management theory as Fayol did. Before they begin such an undertaking, it is important for them to reflect upon their motivations. Their motivations as managers, based on financial and business success are insufficient. Deeper motivations are needed, that are anchored in their own personal history to drive the considerable intellectual investment that is necessary for them to be successful contributors.

Social implications

The results encourage managers to contribute to building and improving management science. They can theorize their experiences in dealing with the management of contemporary issues such as sustainable development and social responsibility. They must do so as Fayol did: using scientific method and strongly motivated by personal beliefs.

Originality/value

The research question is original: “What motivated Fayol to build his management doctrine?”. Scholars rarely ask why individuals decide to build and organize knowledge. This question is relevant for managers today as they too can bring original contributions to management thought. The paper reports previously unpublished details about Fayol's life to answer the research question, and in doing so completes and corrects the works of Sasaki Tsuneo and Henri Verney.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2020

Eric Liguori, Jeff Muldoon and Josh Bendickson

Experiential education is key if the authors as scholar-educators are to empower the next generation of students to recognize opportunities, exploit them and succeed in…

Abstract

Purpose

Experiential education is key if the authors as scholar-educators are to empower the next generation of students to recognize opportunities, exploit them and succeed in entrepreneurship. Experiences facilitate the bridge between theory and practice; experiencing something serves as the linking process between action and thought. Capitalizing on technological advances of the last two decades, this paper depicts how film can be (and why it should be) incorporated into entrepreneurship classrooms.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the learning literature, broadly defined, to assess and articulate the experiential nature of film. More specifically, this paper establishes a framework for film as an experiential pedagogical approach, offering theoretical connections and best practice recommendations. In doing so, this paper assesses two feature films and provide educators with a guide for their use in the classroom.

Findings

This paper establishes a framework for film as an experiential pedagogical approach, offering theoretical connections and best practice recommendations. It concludes with two actionable case examples, broad enough they are deployable in almost any entrepreneurship classroom, assuming English is the primary language.

Originality/value

This paper brings to life a concept some have long assumed is effective, but the literature often neglects: the use of film as an experiential medium. In doing so, two new case examples are developed and available for immediate deployment into classrooms.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Philippe Masset, Alexandre Mondoux and Jean-Philippe Weisskopf

This study aims to identify the price determinants of fine wines in a small and competitive market. These characteristics are found in many lesser-known wine-producing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the price determinants of fine wines in a small and competitive market. These characteristics are found in many lesser-known wine-producing countries and are often difficult to analyse because of lack of data.

Design/methodology/approach

This study hand-collects and transcribes wine-related data for 149 Swiss wineries and 2,454 individual wines over the period 2014–2018 directly from wine lists provided by wineries. This study uses multivariate ordinary least squares regressions to analyse the relation between wine attributes and prices and to assess the effect of a currency shock caused by the sudden appreciation of the Swiss franc in 2015 as well as a reduction in information asymmetries induced by the novel coverage of Swiss wines by The Wine Advocate.

Findings

Prices mainly depend on collective reputation, production techniques and product positioning. Surprisingly, following a sharp appreciation of the Swiss franc, producers did not reduce prices. The arrival of a highly influential wine expert on the market also had a positive price effect on rated wines and producers. Both hint at wineries attempting to position themselves relative to competitors.

Originality/value

Few studies examine the price drivers in lesser-known wine markets, where competition is fierce. This study’s results show that wine pricing differs from other more famous and larger wine regions. In addition, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is also the first to analyse the impact of a currency shock and a reduction in information asymmetries on wine prices.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Alexander Serenko and Nick Bontis

The purpose of this study is to update a global ranking of 27 knowledge management and intellectual capital (KM/IC) academic journals.

2704

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to update a global ranking of 27 knowledge management and intellectual capital (KM/IC) academic journals.

Design/methodology/approach

The ranking was developed based on a combination of results from a survey of 482 active KM/IC researchers and journal citation impact indices.

Findings

The ranking list includes 27 currently active KM/IC journals. The A+ journals are the Journal of Knowledge Management and the Journal of Intellectual Capital. The A journals are the Learning Organization, Knowledge Management Research & Practice, Knowledge and Process Management, VINE: The Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems and International Journal of Knowledge Management. A majority of recently launched journals did not fare well in the ranking. Whereas a journal’s longevity is important, it is not the only factor affecting its ranking position. Expert survey and citation impact measures are relatively consistent, but expert survey ranking scores change faster.

Practical implications

KM/IC discipline stakeholders, including practitioners, editors, publishers, reviewers, researchers, students, administrators and librarians, may consult the developed ranking list for various purposes. Compared to 2008, more researchers indicated KM/IC as their primary area of concentration, which is a positive indicator of discipline development.

Originality/value

This is the most recent ranking list of KM/IC academic journals.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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