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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Paul Desruelle and JeanClaude Burgelman

Presents a view of the forecast impact of e‐commerce on developments of value chains in several economic sectors, with a time horizon of 2005. Highlights the scenarios…

Abstract

Presents a view of the forecast impact of e‐commerce on developments of value chains in several economic sectors, with a time horizon of 2005. Highlights the scenarios that were built and demonstrates that the impact of e‐commerce technologies on value chains may vary widely across firms and sectors, as a function of sector‐specific characteristics. Concludes that the impact of e‐commerce technologies and practices on firms in the current decade may be expected to be of the same magnitude as the impact of management techniques such as just‐in‐time, or total quality management, in the 1990s.

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info, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Erik Bohlin and JeanClaude Burgelman

Introduces five papers which provide a comprehensive picture of recent developments and challenges in the European telecommunications industry. Believes that both…

Abstract

Introduces five papers which provide a comprehensive picture of recent developments and challenges in the European telecommunications industry. Believes that both regulators and managers will find these papers insightful and useful in policy and strategy discussions.

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info, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Carlos Rodríguez Casal, Jean Claude Burgelman and Erik Bohlin

3G in Europe faces not only the challenge of recouping the huge cost of licenses, but also the possibility of being overtaken by the emerging new broadband and wireless…

Abstract

3G in Europe faces not only the challenge of recouping the huge cost of licenses, but also the possibility of being overtaken by the emerging new broadband and wireless technologies. These may coexist or even compete with 3G. IPTS carried out two studies that looked at the milestones for future mobile communications systems, taking into account both the short‐ and the long‐term prospects. The first study addressed success factors for 3G networks, gathering insights from successful experience in other regions of the world, notably Japan. The second covered the influence that alternative technologies might have for the diffusion and uptake of 3G. This paper concludes that, despite competition, universal mobile telecommunications system will lead the future of mobile communications in Europe. It presents the final recommendation to stimulate 3G commercialisation by consolidating 3G as a solid platform for 4G development, integrating co‐existing applications and continuously incorporating emerging standards.

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info, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Carlos Rodríguez Casal, Christine Van Wunnik, Luis Delgado Sancho, Jean Claude Burgelman and Paul Desruelle

This paper aims to present the results of a research project that the Institute for Prospective Technology Studies commissioned to research the possible effects of

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the results of a research project that the Institute for Prospective Technology Studies commissioned to research the possible effects of information and communication technologies (ICT) on a set of environmental indicators in 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

The project adopted an innovative methodology combining qualitative scenario‐building and quantitative modelling.

Findings

The general conclusion was that the impact of ICT is roughly between −20 and +30 percent. Therefore there are significant opportunities for improving environmental sustainability through ICTs, which can rationalise energy management in housing (or facilities), make passenger and freight transport more efficient, and enable a product‐to‐service shift across the economy.

Originality/value

The impact of ICT should accordingly be taken into account by environmental policies in order to ensure that ICT applications make a positive contribution to environmental outcomes, and, at the same time, to suppress rebound effects.

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Corina Pascu, David Osimo, Geomina Turlea, Martin Ulbrich, Yves Punie and JeanClaude Burgelman

The purpose of this paper is to assess the main implications for innovation and competitiveness of social computing trends that promote swift social and economic

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the main implications for innovation and competitiveness of social computing trends that promote swift social and economic relations. They are increasingly being considered by policymakers, both as tool and object for policymaking (i.e. how social computing could play a role in information society policies). Therefore, a general issue for the paper is represented by the lessons to be learned in terms of policy‐related consequences for Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an extensive desk‐based survey of secondary data available from reports, studies and most recent statistics, from internet audience measurement companies, international research companies, research projects of non‐profit centers, international firms or the industry itself.

Findings

The diffusion and usage of social computing applications have been growing at an exponential rate. A powerful feature emerges, i.e. the new user as supplier, co‐producer or innovator of the service. New areas of innovation lie at the crossroads of an increasingly complex process of both tacit and codified knowledge production. They affect the way people find information, learn, share, communicate and consume and the way business is done. New players and markets provide significant threats and opportunities for the ICT and media industries. New players have a smaller cost base, viable business models and a real market.

Research limitations/implications

Comparative and systematic research of the fast growing social computing trends is needed over longer periods of time.

Practical implications

The paper provides the first evidence on the size and weight of these trends, as well as on their social and economic relevance. It raises the need for more research, e.g. on the areas that would be most impacted and to what extent, as well as a wealth of policy‐related research questions.

Originality/value

Since social computing is an emerging phenomenon, the work is innovative and novel because it attempts to draw a first solid overall picture of the development of these trends.

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Foresight, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

K. Ducatel, J.‐C. Burgelman and M. Bogdanowicz

Reports on a scenario exercise regarding the impact of digitisation on European media content industries, focusing on employment trends and changing skills. Concludes that…

Abstract

Reports on a scenario exercise regarding the impact of digitisation on European media content industries, focusing on employment trends and changing skills. Concludes that the Internet will profoundly restructure but not destroy, existing industries. Highlights the needs for multidisciplinary and multimedia training programmes for the new digital age.

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info, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Simon Linacre

Abstract

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info, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Abstract

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info, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Andrew Calabrese

The prospect that technological and social innovation in the use of communication and information technologies are bringing about an end to sovereignty has been a source…

Abstract

The prospect that technological and social innovation in the use of communication and information technologies are bringing about an end to sovereignty has been a source of optimism, pessimism and ambivalence. It has captured the popular imagination and it can be found in the anxieties of national leaders about the mingling and collision of cultures and cultural products within and across their borders, and about growing awareness that environmental threats bow to no flag. According to much of this discourse, national governments are becoming increasingly powerless in their battles against real or imagined plights of cultural imperialism (and sub‐imperialism, that is, cultural imperialism within states) and capital mobility, as well as in their efforts to effectively exercise political control through surveillance and censorship. The end of sovereignty is a theme in political discussions about new pressures brought on by global regimes of trade and investment, and by unprecedented levels of global criminal networks for drug trafficking, money laundering and trade in human flesh. Social movements and non‐governmental organizations (NGOs) have reflected this by recognizing the need to match the scale of the problems they confront with appropriately scaled collective action. This article examines the discourse about the end of sovereignty and therise of new institutions of global governance. Particular emphasis is given to how advancements in the means of communication have produced the ambivalent outcomes of threatening the democratic governance of sovereign states, and serving as foundations for the assertion of democratic rights and popular sovereignty on a global scale.

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info, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2005

Cecile K. M. Crutzen

Questioning gender is about taking an active, critical role in the technological design of our daily behaviour. It is a deconstruction of the oppositions that exist in the…

Abstract

Questioning gender is about taking an active, critical role in the technological design of our daily behaviour. It is a deconstruction of the oppositions that exist in the discourses of Ambient Intelligence designers, the ICT industry and computer scientists. What underlies the assumption that Ambient Intelligence will, by disappearing into our environment, bring humans both an easy and entertaining life? The gender perspective can uncover power relations within the promotion and realisation of Ambient Intelligence that satisfy an obvious wish for a technological heaven. The deconstruction of the promise of progress and a better life reveals what is overvalued, what is undervalued and what is ignored. This paper is a deconstruction of the view, currently prevalent in the discourses of Ambient Intelligence; a view of humans and the way they live. A view that will influence the way women and men will be allowed to construct their lives.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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