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Article

Jayson W. Richardson, Jeremy Lucian Daniel Watts and William L. Sterrett

The purpose of this study was to better understand the challenges faced by leaders who have demonstrated excellence in integrating technology into teaching and learning in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to better understand the challenges faced by leaders who have demonstrated excellence in integrating technology into teaching and learning in P-12 schools in the United States.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study of technology savvy P-12 school principals provides insights into how building leaders overcome digital technology innovation challenges. In the summer of 2017, the authors interviewed 12 of the 18 recipients of the NASSP Digital Principal Award. These principals serve as examples of how to lead schools in the digital age.

Findings

Using Bolman and Deal's (2013) conceptual framework, the authors analyzed the data around the four frames (i.e., political, structural, human resources, and symbolic) to understand the challenges of being a digital principal. Bolman and Deal posited leaders who function predominantly in a single frame may miss essential organizational change elements.

Research limitations/implications

The authors recognize several limitations in this study. First, the nominating process for the NASSP Digital Principals award involves an application process. Thus, while these principals were recognized for meeting these criteria, it is possible that these awardees were selected based on their nomination materials rather than on actual longitudinal evidence. Second, this study's data were gathered through interviews. The authors did not gather data through student work samples, teacher and staff interviews, or other data points, but rather the single data point of principal perspectives through interviews.

Originality/value

One silver lining from the pandemic is that leading schools cannot be detangled from the digital needs of diverse stakeholders. As such, digital principalship has become the new norm where the principal leads on a screen, teachers teach on a screen, and students learn on a screen. The award-winning digital principals in this study played an integral role in how they message their school's story, how they navigate and design structures, how they overcome political realities, and how they invest in addressing the needs of individuals.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Case study

Jayson W. Richardson and Sara Heintzelman

Young professors Baxter, Jim, and Robert are eager to start a new graduate certificate in educational leadership with a focus on technology. The department supports their…

Abstract

Synopsis

Young professors Baxter, Jim, and Robert are eager to start a new graduate certificate in educational leadership with a focus on technology. The department supports their initiative. The department is even supportive of offering this certificate fully online. Support waned when, in an effort to boost student enrollment, it is suggested that additional graduate courses and programs within the department also move fully online. In department meetings, faculty members argue about the rigor of online courses and if it is possible to convert existing courses and programs to an online delivery format. Tammy and Larry are veteran faculty members who do not want to teach online and have made it clear to the rest of the faculty they are not eager to change. When there are not enough students to offer their programs in the traditional format, all faculty members are forced to begin teach online.

Research methodology

This is a disguised field-researched case.

Relevant courses and levels

This case may be used in a variety of graduate business or education courses, such as introduction to business, business ethics, educational leadership, technology leadership, or higher education.

Theoretical bases

Students should have some understanding of systems change, ethical decision making, and human resources development.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

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Article

William L. Sterrett and Jayson W. Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to help the researchers sought to take a closer look at the technology challenges facing district superintendents in today’s leadership climate.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to help the researchers sought to take a closer look at the technology challenges facing district superintendents in today’s leadership climate.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors chose semi-structured interviews as the data collection method. Through 45 min, one-on-one, semi-structured telephone interviews, the researchers were able to collect data about overcoming the challenges of being a modern technology-savvy superintendent.

Findings

Through the analysis, the authors identified four themes related to the challenges faced by these district leaders, including meeting the needs of stakeholders, supporting professional development, fostering mindset changes and addressing a fear of the unknown.

Research limitations/implications

This study only relied on interviews and did not examine evidence from the field, such as site visits or artifact examination.

Practical implications

This study provides the field with insights into the role of the change-ready district leaders who foster lasting technology-infused transformation.

Social implications

While challenges for any district leader wishing to make long-lasting change exist, there are district leaders today who embody second-order change leadership when overcoming the challenge of school technology leadership. These technology-savvy superintendents play an important role as whole-system change agents.

Originality/value

This study highlighted that there many district leaders today who embody second-order change leadership in helping move their districts forward.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article

Dana Specker Watts and Jayson W. Richardson

The purpose of this study was to investigate the connection between professional development and professional capital within international schools in Asia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the connection between professional development and professional capital within international schools in Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was an exploratory multisite case study. Teachers and leaders in six high performing international schools in Asia were surveyed to measure their professional capital. Three leaders with the highest professional capital from different schools were interviewed to better understand how professional development fosters professional capital of their teachers.

Findings

International school leaders tended to have high professional capital while teachers reported having less professional capital. Leaders fostered professional capital of their teachers through professional development by supporting the intellectual passions of individuals, fostering collaborative learning within and across international schools and creating a culture of safety and vulnerability for teachers to try new things.

Research limitations/implications

This study showed that a short version of the professional capital survey tested well in this context with items just focused on professional development. However, more work needs to be done to make the individual constructs more robust as it pertains to professional development. This research also highlighted the need to look at how international school teachers foster their own professional capital through professional development.

Originality/value

This is the first study that focused on the intersection of professional capital and professional development. Additionally, this article serves as one of the few studies of professional capital in international schools.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

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Book part

Jayson W. Richardson and Jeffrey Lee

Comparative education and international education are central themes in the field of information and communication technology for development (ICT4D). Policies, projects…

Abstract

Comparative education and international education are central themes in the field of information and communication technology for development (ICT4D). Policies, projects, and practices around technology are often created and enacted based on best practices compared across multiple contexts and disciplines. As such, ICT4D research is at the nexus of understanding how youth can be empowered through technology, teacher pedagogy can be enhanced through technology, and how marginalized communities can leverage technology to leapfrog into the 21st century. In this essay, the authors explore these themes as a way to enforce the synergies among scholars in the fields of ICT4D and comparative and international education.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

Keywords

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Article

Jayson W. Richardson and Edward J. Brantmeier

The world is now in an era of condensed space and time in which cultural dynamics, including cultural conflict, are increasingly mediated by powerful technologies that…

Abstract

Purpose

The world is now in an era of condensed space and time in which cultural dynamics, including cultural conflict, are increasingly mediated by powerful technologies that hold the potential to accelerate change and create new opportunities. Conversely, these same powerful technologies, and the denial thereof, are used to sustain oppressive conditions and wage war for ideological (e.g. religion and politics) and material purposes (e.g. water, oil, and food). From the power of networking, in addition to the tyranny of isolation, information and communication technologies (ICTs) hold the potential for transformative change, as well as to maintain status quo through oppression and domination. The purpose of this paper is to create a model that attempts to delineate the role of ICTs in catalyzing a peaceful and democratic conflict transformation, while using a snapshot of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011; also to hypothesize that the adoption of modern digital technologies has created a mechanism for protests to achieve their ends through relatively peaceful mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

This analysis explores the use of ICTs in the protest process, using a snapshot of the Egyptian protests of 2011. The authors test a model of ICTs for peace and conflict transformation.

Findings

It is found that, in essence, it effectively describes nuances of the modern protest process. However, the researchers propose a modified explanatory model of how ICTs are used, and can be used, for political mobilization on the road toward sustainable peace.

Research limitations/implications

Every protest and every regime change is unique. The model used in this case needs to be tested further in other instances.

Social implications

This model could be used to analyze other protests and uprising to understand an array of stakeholders' needs.

Originality/value

Analyzing those events that are fundamentally being changed through the use of modern technology is a valuable contribution to the field.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

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Article

Jayson W. Richardson, Scott McLeod and Amy Garrett Dikkers

The purpose of this study is to investigate the perceptions of human resource directors in the USA about online credentials earned by K‐12 school principals and principal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the perceptions of human resource directors in the USA about online credentials earned by K‐12 school principals and principal candidates.

Design/methodology/approach

In this mixed methods study, a survey was sent to a random sample of 500 human resource directors in K‐12 school districts across the USA. Analysis was conducted on 105 surveys.

Findings

In contrast to a traditional face‐to‐face format, the majority of respondents reported beliefs that online courses and online degrees aimed at school principals required less work, were of lower quality, and could not adequately prepare leaders to tackle state‐specific issues. Human resource directors in rural districts had a more negative perception of online learning, in comparison to their counterparts in suburban or urban districts. All preparatory courses, except technology leadership, were reported to be easier taught face‐to‐face, than online.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should be conducted to determine if and how these perceptions are shifting. Further research should also be conducted to determine the influence of location on perceptions of online credentials for school leaders. Comparing perceptions about online credentials cross‐nationally may provide interesting insights and new areas of research.

Practical implications

Implications are for school administration programs, both traditional and online, that desire to create and build more accepted school administration programs that include online components.

Social implications

Students increasingly opt for online coursework; students in the field of school leadership and administration in the USA are no different. This shift to online learning must be juxtaposed with efforts to maintain quality, improve efficiency, and address the concerns of those persons who hire these candidates.

Originality/value

To date, no research has been published on the perceived acceptability of online degrees and online coursework for school principals in the USA.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

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