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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Carol Oliver, Sandra Pass, Jayne Taylor and Pam Taylor

An investigation into the process of cross‐fertilisation on MBAprogrammes is reported. An interview schedule was devised as a basis fordiscussions with a sample from each…

Abstract

An investigation into the process of cross‐fertilisation on MBA programmes is reported. An interview schedule was devised as a basis for discussions with a sample from each of three MBA programme types: open, in‐company and consortial. It was concluded that: learning from and acting upon ideas gained from fellow set members is seen as an important element in the MBA programme by associates: cross‐fertilisation tends to be recognised and recalled mainly in terms of personal skills; open sets would potentially appear to be a better medium for fostering cross‐fertilisation, but in‐company sets are more empowering in ensuring the implementation of ideas from such cross‐fertilisation as does occur, while consortial sets would appear to combine the best of both worlds – though no evidence emerged to support this last contention. Recommendations are made for further research.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Carol Oliver, Sandra Pass, Jayne Taylor and Pamela Taylor

A questionnaire‐based survey of a business school′s MBA graduatesdraws conclusions on their entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial leanings.The authors suggest that specific…

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Abstract

A questionnaire‐based survey of a business school′s MBA graduates draws conclusions on their entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial leanings. The authors suggest that specific combinations of personal characteristics and support systems will make implementation of MBA project findings more likely.

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Management Decision, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

A.N.M. Waheeduzzaman

The ultimate goal of competitiveness is the well being of the citizens of a country. From this perspective, this study investigates the contribution of international…

Abstract

The ultimate goal of competitiveness is the well being of the citizens of a country. From this perspective, this study investigates the contribution of international competitiveness on per capita income, human development, and inequality in 45 countries of the world. Correlation and regression analysis were conducted to determine the relationships. The results indicate that international competitiveness positively influences per capita income and human development. Competitiveness also influences the reduction of inequality in a country. Longitudinal studies with more country data needs to be conducted to further the relationships established through cross‐sectional research.

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

NCC? You Can Say That Again The 1987 Salary Survey from the National Computing Centre (NCC) pinpointed a requirement for over 5,000 new networking staff over the next five…

Abstract

NCC? You Can Say That Again The 1987 Salary Survey from the National Computing Centre (NCC) pinpointed a requirement for over 5,000 new networking staff over the next five years, and confirmed that communications was emerging as one of the fastest‐growing job categories at around 13 per cent per annum. To meet this growing requirement the Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE), the Telecommunications Users' Association (TUA) and NCC are to investigate the demand for a National Certificate in Communications. They believe that the introduction of such a Certificate would increase the supply of qualified communications specialists able to apply technical and management skills in a business environment. This joint initiative comes in response to concern over the current shortage of high‐quality staff competent to plan and operate communications facilities in user organisations. Communications in this context embraces telephone systems, data networks and the whole range of text and image equipment on which organisations rely for their day‐to‐day business. The three organisations called all interested parties in government, industry and education to a meeting in London on 16 June to discuss the issue, with a view to introducing a course in October 1989 at approved colleges and educational establishments throughout the UK.

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Education + Training, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1994

Abby Day and John Peters

Describes the process and outputs of the findings to date in aresearch project to determine quality in academic business journalpublishing, sponsored by a major academic…

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1932

Abstract

Describes the process and outputs of the findings to date in a research project to determine quality in academic business journal publishing, sponsored by a major academic publishing house. Describes the refereeing/review process for journal articles, a study of quality indicators in established “academic” journals, and the same in “practitioner” journals. Draws conclusions for quality improvement in the journals surveyed based on the findings. Draws conclusions for other researchers and publishers.

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Library Review, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2017

Layla Jayne Branicki, Bridgette Sullivan-Taylor and Sarah Rachael Livschitz

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how entrepreneurial behaviors support small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) resilience, refine the concept of entrepreneurial…

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3185

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how entrepreneurial behaviors support small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) resilience, refine the concept of entrepreneurial resilience, and identify how SME resilience might be promoted.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected in the UK via 11 focus groups which provided a sub-sample of 19 SME participants.

Findings

Because of their experience operating in uncertain environments, their direct experience of adversity, and the informal organizational settings they inhabit, entrepreneurs are often highly resilient and possess capabilities that enable SMEs to be resilient. Entrepreneurial resilience provides a basis for SME resilience that differs significantly from best practices as understood in larger firms.

Research limitations/implications

Exploratory qualitative research on a small sample (n=19) limits the generalizability of this work. Further research could quantitatively test the paper’s findings and/or examine the link between entrepreneurial resilience and the resilience of larger firms.

Practical implications

Rather than encouraging formal planning and redundancy, policy and practice designed to promote the resilience of SMEs should pay greater attention to building capacities to cope with uncertainty, generating and leveraging personal relationships, and activating the ability to experiment and think creatively in response to crises.

Originality/value

This paper draws on organizational psychology research to refine understanding of entrepreneurial resilience and to empirically examine and inductively theorize the multi-level relationships between entrepreneurial resilience and SME resilience.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Jayne Krisjanous and Christine Hallett

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how a historical event packaged as an iconic heritage cultural brand can be marketized and modified over time to ensure brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how a historical event packaged as an iconic heritage cultural brand can be marketized and modified over time to ensure brand longevity and continued emotional commitment and loyalty through the leverage of stories and associations more closely aligned with modern-day audiences. The authors do this through examining the marketization of the New Zealand World War 1 (WWI) nurse to today’s audiences. The periods of study are WWI (1914–1918) and then the modern day. The New Zealand Army Nursing Service (NZANS) during WWI has previously had little attention as a key actor in the Australia and New Zealand Army Corp (ANZAC), Today ANZAC is held as pivotal in the birth of New Zealand’s perception of nationhood and as an iconic heritage cultural brand. The history and legend of the ANZAC plays an important role in New Zealand culture and is fundamental to the “Anzac Spirit”, a signifier of what it means to be a New Zealander.

Design/methodology/approach

A historical case study method is used. The primary source of data is 1914–1918, and includes contemporaneous articles, and personal writings: diaries, letters and published memoirs. More contemporary works form the basis for discussion of marketization as it relates to the NZANS. The article first presents conceptual framing, then the development of the Anzac brand and the history of the NZANS and its role in WWI before turning to discussion on the marketization of this nursing service to today’s audiences and as part of the ANZAC/Anzac brand.

Findings

Today the story of the WWI NZANS nurse, previously seldom heard, has been co-opted and is becoming increasingly merged as an integral part of the Anzac story. The history of the NZANS during WWI has a great deal of agency today as part of that story, serving many functions within it and providing a valuable lever for marketization.

Originality/value

To date, there is a scarcity of marketing analysis that examines the marketization of history. By focusing on New Zealand WWI nursing as a contributor to the Anzac story, the authors contribute to the understanding of how marketers package and contemporize history for appeal to audiences through both sustaining and reworking cultural branding.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 1997

Raymond J. Hawkins

Abstract

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Applying Maximum Entropy to Econometric Problems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-187-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Amanda Bishop and Jayne Henry

The following case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of a man with mild learning disabilities and a history of violent behaviour. Following several…

Abstract

The following case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of a man with mild learning disabilities and a history of violent behaviour. Following several years of offence‐related work, identification of chronic low self‐esteem provided an alternative approach to addressing the risk of violence by treatment based on the cognitive model of low self‐esteem. Global self‐esteem and fear of negative evaluation were assessed at baseline, middle and end of treatment and at one‐month follow‐up. Although scores improved over the course of 23 sessions and were maintained at one‐month follow‐up, the change was minimal and unlikely to be clinically significant. However, the client reported benefits from therapy and there were observable positive behaviour changes. Discharge was facilitated from secure services to supported living in the community. The results from this case study show that, with adaptation, cognitive behavioural therapy for low self‐esteem may successfully be applied to people with mild learning disabilities. Therapy to address issues underlying offending behaviour is often required in addition to offending behaviour programmes in order to reduce risk of re‐offending.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Stan Trembach, Jayne Blodgett, Annie Epperson and Natasha Floersch

The purpose of this paper is to advocate for change in academic library space assessment and use philosophy in favor of a more user-centered approach emphasizing space…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advocate for change in academic library space assessment and use philosophy in favor of a more user-centered approach emphasizing space designed for and by users themselves. This goal is achieved by analyzing the implementation of a recent space assessment project at the University of Northern Colorado Libraries to investigate specific patterns of library space utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study for which data were collected through a multi-method approach, including flip chart and whiteboard questions, brief semi-structured “tabling” interviews, and more in-depth “roving” interviews.

Findings

The current library literature on space assessment does not encompass broader, more holistic approaches to how library space is used by students, faculty, staff and community users. The findings from this study highlight the diversity of ways patrons may use an academic library, many of which are related to academic work. However, visitors also come to the library for other purposes, such as socializing or attending an event. It is imperative that the space be adequately equipped to meet varied visitor needs and to create a welcoming environment for all patrons.

Originality/value

The paper has several implications for planning and managing the operations of medium-sized academic libraries. It contributes to the larger conversation in higher education about the importance of user research for enhancing visitor experience through data-informed decision-making. Furthermore, the project it details is not an isolated assessment effort but part of the library’s ongoing space assessment work.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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