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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Thomas Kenworthy and Jaydeep Balakrishnan

The purpose of this paper is to analyze more than three decades of theory testing published in leading operations management (OM) journals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze more than three decades of theory testing published in leading operations management (OM) journals.

Design/methodology/approach

This piece examines the amount of theory testing, the extent to which theories are tested multiple times, and the disciplinary origins of the theories that are tested.

Findings

The analysis revealed that empirical OM researchers have increasingly responded to demands for more theory-driven knowledge over time. OM researchers are developing and using a wide array of domestic theories to understand empirical data. The examination also revealed a substantial focus on theory borrowed from other scientific fields.

Originality/value

The findings here suggest that OM is clearly a maturing discipline. As the discipline matures, it is important to consider to what extent borrowed theories and frameworks can offer value to OM. A preliminary vetting model is advanced in order to critically assess foreign theory. It is hoped that future screening promotes only the most useful non-domestic theory, thereby ensuring sufficient journal space for domestic theory and resulting in effective solutions to the pressing, practical problems of the OM field.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Rong Zhao, Raj Mashruwala, Shailendra Pandit and Jaydeep Balakrishnan

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a large-sample empirical investigation of how relational capital impacts bullwhip at the supplier.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a large-sample empirical investigation of how relational capital impacts bullwhip at the supplier.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses mandatory disclosures in regulatory filings of US firms to identify a supplier’s major customers and constructs empirical proxies of supply chain relational capital, i.e., length of the relationship between suppliers and customers and partner interdependence. Multivariate regression analyses are performed to examine the effects of relational capital on bullwhip at the supplier.

Findings

The findings show that bullwhip at the supplier is greater when customers are more dependent on their suppliers, but is reduced when suppliers share longer relationships with their customers. The results also provide additional insights on several firm characteristics that impact supplier bullwhip, including shocks in order backlog, selling intensity and variations in profit margins. Furthermore, the authors document that the effect of supply chain relationships on bullwhip tends to vary across industries and over time.

Originality/value

The study employs a novel data set that is constructed using firms’ financial disclosures. This large panel data set consisting of 13,993 observations over 36 years enables thorough and robust analyses to characterize supply chain relationships and gain a deeper understanding of their impact on bullwhip.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Tim Sweet, Jaydeep Balakrishnan, Brad Robertson, Jennifer Stolee and Sarah Karim

This paper aims to report on a case study conducted to help plan a rollout process for hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) type food safety policies at a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on a case study conducted to help plan a rollout process for hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) type food safety policies at a frozen pie facility in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing company policies were prioritized using a quality function deployment tool, which quantified the qualitative material in the original manual based on a number of developed criteria. Interrelations between the different required tasks were also quantified to facilitate effective implementation.

Findings

The use of quality function deployment was shown to be useful in speeding up the implementation of food safety policies in the facility.

Practical implications

Quality function deployment, originally from new product design, proved useful when applied to HACCP implementation.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the use of product development tools to facilitate the effective introduction of HACCP like procedures. Thus it will be of use to academics and practitioners interested in HACCP implementation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Donald C. Kerr and Jaydeep Balakrishnan

Many algorithms have been proposed to form manufacturing cells from component routeings. Most of these methods require specialized algorithms for implementation. Some…

Abstract

Many algorithms have been proposed to form manufacturing cells from component routeings. Most of these methods require specialized algorithms for implementation. Some others use well known procedures such as integer programming. However, these may be difficult for practising managers to comprehend. Proposes a simple method that can be implemented using spreadsheet software. The method is based on similarity coefficients and a pair‐wise interchange procedure. Describes the method and the spreadsheet implementation. Compares our procedure with many existing procedures using eight well‐known problems from the literature. Using three evaluation measures shows that the proposed procedure is effective. Given its simplicity and effectiveness, it may be useful to practitioners and researchers.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 16 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Giovani J.C. da Silveira, Brent Snider and Jaydeep Balakrishnan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of compensation‐based incentives in relationships between enterprise resource planning (ERP) usage and delivery…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of compensation‐based incentives in relationships between enterprise resource planning (ERP) usage and delivery performance in manufacturing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carry out two studies exploring links between ERP, incentives, and performance from alternative perspectives: first, of incentives tied to regular production activities, and their relationship with delivery performance advantage over competitors; second, of incentives tied to improvement activities and their relationship with delivery performance improvements. Statistical analysis is carried out on data from 698 metal‐working manufacturers from 22 countries, giving a broad cross‐sectional view of a global industry.

Findings

The studies indicate that ERP usage relates positively with both delivery advantage and delivery improvements. Furthermore, incentives tied to improvement initiatives may explain delivery improvements, both directly and as moderators in the relationship between ERP and performance.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that ERP adoption can be framed as a principal‐agency phenomenon where performance outcomes are partially influenced by incentives.

Practical implications

The results imply that incentives tied to improvement initiatives may foster employee engagement with the new ERP, leading to stronger delivery performance benefits.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first research to explore ERP usage as a principal‐agency problem, and to analyse its relationships with incentives under alternative performance perspectives. The results may significantly contribute to the knowledge of ERP‐performance relationships and the role of incentives.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2009

Brent Snider, Giovani J.C. da Silveira and Jaydeep Balakrishnan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the critical success factors (CSFs) of enterprise resource planning (ERP) system implementation in small and medium‐sized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the critical success factors (CSFs) of enterprise resource planning (ERP) system implementation in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Five case studies of Canadian SMEs were conducted. They included interviewing individuals from five roles at each organization and gathering project documents. Following an evaluation of each project's success (within‐case analysis), cross‐case analysis was conducted to elicit influential and distinctive factors.

Findings

Factors were identified that appeared to explain variation between successful and unsuccessful implementations at SMEs, besides factors that appeared to be innovative or counter‐intuitive in light of the established literature.

Research limitations/implications

The study reinforces the need for more research that is focused on SMEs. All cases were of Canadian SMEs with either a manufacturing or distribution focus, potentially limiting the generalizability of findings to other industries or countries.

Practical implications

By identifying relevant CSFs for SMEs, managers can better prioritize implementation efforts and resources to maximize success of ERP implementations.

Originality/value

The paper appears to be one of the first studies to focus on the CSFs of ERP implementation at SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Jaydeep Balakrishnan and Chun Hung Cheng

The purpose of this research paper is to discuss cellular manufacturing is discussed under conditions of changing product demand. Traditional cell formation procedures…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to discuss cellular manufacturing is discussed under conditions of changing product demand. Traditional cell formation procedures ignore any changes in demand over time from product redesign and other factors. However given that in today's business environment, product life cycles are short, a framework is proposed that creates a multi‐period cellular layout plan including cell redesign where appropriate.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is illustrated using a two‐stage procedure based on the generalized machine assignment problem and dynamic programming. This framework is conceptually compared to virtual cell manufacturing, which is useful when there is uncertainty in demand rather than anticipated changes in demand. A case study is used to explain how the concept would work in practice.

Findings

One major characteristic of the proposed method is that it is flexible enough to incorporate existing cell formation procedures. It is shown through an example problem that the proposed two‐stage method is better than undergoing ad hoc layout changes or ignoring the demand changes when shifting or cell rearrangement costs exist. It also sheds some insight into cellular manufacturing under dynamic conditions.

Originality/value

This paper should be useful to both researchers and practitioners who deal with demand changes in cellular manufacturing.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Brent Snider

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 30 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

V. Shukla

To reduce the cost of epoxy adhesive without affecting the properties of epoxy adhesive in two pack system.

Abstract

Purpose

To reduce the cost of epoxy adhesive without affecting the properties of epoxy adhesive in two pack system.

Design/methodology/approach

For effective toughening, adhesion, chemical resistance, etc. various compositions were made by incorporating flow modified solid epoxy resin. The impact, adhesive strengths and some other properties of the unmodified and modified epoxy networks were characterised.

Findings

The modification of epoxy resin using flow modified solid epoxy resin showed significant enhancement of impact and adhesive strengths and chemical resistance over the unmodified one. The optimum results were obtained at 13.66 parts per hundred parts of epoxy resin (phr) of modifier by replacing 4.33 phr of aerosil.

Research limitations/implications

The modifier, 7004 FM, used in the present context was high molecular weight flow modified epoxy resin. Besides, these results could be obtained from other grades of flow modified high molecular weight epoxy resin. In addition, the efficiency of modification of epoxy resin using this could also be studied.

Practical implications

The method developed provided a simple and practical solution to removing the costly aerosil without affecting properties such as toughness, adhesive strength and chemical resistance of the cured epoxy.

Originality/value

The method for enhancing toughness, adhesive strength and chemical resistance of cured epoxy was novel and could find numerous applications in surface coating and adhesive.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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