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1 – 10 of 48
Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

K.R. Jayasimha, Himanshu Shekhar Srivastava and Sivaraman Manoharan

Access-based services (ABS) have been adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aims to validate customer barriers to ABS focusing on the contamination…

Abstract

Purpose

Access-based services (ABS) have been adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aims to validate customer barriers to ABS focusing on the contamination barrier. As service employees’ presence violates the COVID-19 physical distancing norms and heightens contamination fear, this paper tests its effects on continued use intentions of ABS. This study also empirically examines the role of conspicuous virtue signaling and organizational response.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in the context of scooter sharing and uses a mixed-method to explore the relatively under-researched problem of contamination fear in ABS. Study one uses the survey method and study two uses a 2 × 2 matrix between-subject design.

Findings

The results reveal that perceptions of resource sufficiency positively affect continued use intentions of ABS. The presence of a service employee hurts continued use intentions. Further, there are a three-way interaction between ABS type (service employee presence/absence), organizational response (solution-oriented/general information) and resource sufficiency perceptions. Organizational response mitigates the negative effect of service employee presence on the link between resource adequacy perceptions and ABS continued use intentions.

Originality/value

In contrast with prior research, this study shows that contamination fear invokes protection motivation, resulting in better preparedness and continued use intentions of ABS. The predicted difference is primarily between customers who attribute responsibility and ABS type differently (presence/absence of service employee). This study also explores the role of organizational response to COVID-19.

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2017

K.R. Jayasimha, Harish Chaudhary and Anurag Chauhan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavioral outcomes and effectiveness of organizational response to open complaints by consumers following a dissatisfactory…

1709

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavioral outcomes and effectiveness of organizational response to open complaints by consumers following a dissatisfactory service experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Three natural communities (WhatsApp groups) were used with reference to online food and grocery retailing. The respondents comprised community members sharing negative experiences on the group. A scenario implanted in a survey was used as the research approach.

Findings

Consumer advocacy, a form of complaining, is a way to help other community members. The relationship between consumer advocacy and community usefulness strengthens the argument of consumers’ collective concern as one of the motivational frames for consumer advocacy. Consumer advocates show stronger reactions, resulting in brand avoidance following voice complaining. An effective organizational response can mitigate brand avoidance.

Practical implications

Finding ways to restrict and alleviate brand avoidance is an area that is of major interest to practitioners. The study finds that prospective explanations could be a very effective antidote to brand avoidance.

Originality/value

The social side of complaining is a relatively under-researched area. This study examines the relationship between consumer advocacy, community usefulness and brand avoidance. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the moderating effect of organizational response on consumer advocacy and its outcomes in the virtual context.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2018

Khadija Ali Vakeel, K. Sivakumar, K.R. Jayasimha and Shubhamoy Dey

The purpose of this paper is to focus on failures in online flash sales (OFS) and to explore why consumers participate in an OFS even after experiencing service failure…

1898

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on failures in online flash sales (OFS) and to explore why consumers participate in an OFS even after experiencing service failure. It also examines the role of deal proneness, attribution, and emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed method approach to gain insights into this relatively unexplored phenomenon of OFS, this research uses netnography followed by a survey study.

Findings

The findings show that deal-prone customers tend to ignore service failures during OFS and re-participate in the future. In the context of OFS, failures attributed to internal locus of attribution (LOA) also have a negative effect on re-participation compared with failures attributed to external LOA. Furthermore, there is a three-way interaction among deal proneness, LOA, and past emotions. The results show that negative past emotions further exacerbate the impact of attribution on the link between deal proneness and re-participation.

Originality/value

In contrast with prior research, the paper shows that consumers participate even after service failure. The proposed difference is between customers who experience different LOA and past emotions offers insights into their behavior after service failure in a new context of an online/electronic commerce event – flash sales. This paper specifically explores the role of internal LOA and finds that it has a more negative impact than external LOA on re-participation.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2021

Himanshu Shekhar Srivastava, K.R. Jayasimha and K. Sivakumar

Access-based services (ABSs) provide short-term access to goods, physical facilities, space or labor in exchange for access fees without transferring legal ownership (e.g…

Abstract

Purpose

Access-based services (ABSs) provide short-term access to goods, physical facilities, space or labor in exchange for access fees without transferring legal ownership (e.g. bike-sharing). This study aims to investigate what service providers can do to minimize financial losses when customers misbehave with the service providers’ assets in ABSs. The study also examines the effects of product misuse on subsequent customers and what factors may mitigate it.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a scenario-based experiment to test the conceptual model.

Findings

Injunctive norms reduce the mediating effect of descriptive norms on misbehavior contagion. As generally accepted and approved (injunctive) norms become salient, they override the impact of prevailing (descriptive) norms, thereby breaking the vicious cycle of misbehavior contagion. Customer-company identification (CCI) and reduced interpersonal anonymity mitigate the effects of previous misbehavior on misbehavior contagion.

Practical implications

ABS firms should strive to mitigate the financial and reputational losses they suffer from customer misbehavior. Such mitigation would be a win-win for the ABS firm (reduced misbehavior) and the customers (improved user experience).

Originality/value

The research complements prior research highlighting the role of social norms in misbehavior contagion. The study demonstrates the role of boundary conditions by investigating the interactive effects of descriptive and injunctive norms. In addition, it shows the positive impact of CCI and reduced interpersonal anonymity on containing misbehavior contagion.

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Srinivasa Raghavan R., Jayasimha K.R. and Rajendra V. Nargundkar

Organizations worldwide are adopting software as a service (SaaS) applications, where they pay a subscription fee to gain access rather than buying the software. The…

1495

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations worldwide are adopting software as a service (SaaS) applications, where they pay a subscription fee to gain access rather than buying the software. The extant models on software acquisition processes, several of which are based on organizational buying behavior, do not sufficiently explain how SaaS application acquisition decisions are made. This study aims to investigate the acquisition process organizations follow for SaaS software, the changes to the roles of the Chief Information Officer (CIO) and the business user and also looks at the impact of SaaS on the proliferation of unauthorized software systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used exploratory research using the grounded theory approach based on 18 in-depth interviews conducted with respondents who have studied with enterprise software delivered on-premise and as SaaS in different roles such as sales, consulting, CIO, information technology (IT) management and product development.

Findings

The authors identified a need to classify the SaaS software and developed a framework that uses software specificity and its strategic importance to the organization to classify SaaS applications. The aforementioned framework is used to explain how software evaluation processes have changed for different kinds of SaaS applications. The authors also found that the CIO’s and the business users’ have changed substantially in SaaS application evaluations and found evidence to show that shadow IT will be restricted to some classes of SaaS applications.

Originality/value

By focusing on the changes to the roles and responsibilities of the members of the buying center, this paper provides unique insights into how the acquisition process of SaaS is different from the extant models used to explain enterprise software acquisitions. An understanding of how information search is conducted by the business users will help software vendors to target business users better.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Krishnan Iyer and Jayasimha K.R.

This paper aims to investigate the dynamics of the organizational buying process of radical software innovations. Acquisition of technology innovations by early adopting…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the dynamics of the organizational buying process of radical software innovations. Acquisition of technology innovations by early adopting organizations has been studied previously with scant attention being given to the actual buying process and the risk mitigation mechanism. This paper addresses these gaps in the literature and this paper finds evidence to support that the organizational buying process of radical software innovations is different from the general models of organizational buying.

Design/methodology/approach

Methods from the grounded theory approach were used to conduct 20 in-depth interviews with senior industry practitioners. Purposive sampling was used to identify the participants.

Findings

A theoretical model of the organizational buying process of radical software innovations emerged with themes and concepts that explain the dynamics of the buying and adoption processes. The paper challenges the fundamental tenet of organizational buying that needs recognition triggers the buying process. An interesting nuance was found that risk is mitigated within the buying action itself.

Practical implications

An understanding of the buyer behaviour process will help marketers of radical software innovations to formulate the appropriate marketing response. Sales personnel can attune their customer interactions when helping customers to acquire a radical software innovation. Firms that want to be early adopters and innovate can tune their buying process in line with the findings.

Originality/value

This paper develops a typological buying model. It unravels the dynamics of the adoption process by discussing how early adopting organizations buy radical software innovations. New concepts with rich explanatory powers are discussed.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Muhammad Azeem Abro, Rohaizat Baharun and Ahsan Zubair

This study aims to investigate the impact of consumer advocacy on community usefulness and brand avoidance. Moreover, the study scrutinizes the mediating role and impact…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of consumer advocacy on community usefulness and brand avoidance. Moreover, the study scrutinizes the mediating role and impact of organizational feedback/response and moderating role of information credibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The explanatory and cross-sectional research design was used in the study. Primary data were collected from broadband internet users and 249 responses gathered across the country. The study sample comprises of individuals sharing unfavorable service experiences on social media.

Findings

The key findings of the study highlight that consumer advocacy is a type of complaining method, which is used to help other society members; hence, there is a strong relationship among consumer’s advocacy and society’s usefulness. Brand avoidance is the outcome of stronger reactions by consumer advocates and through efficient organizational feedback, the impact of advocacy can be mitigated. Moreover, the study found that effective organizational explanations can be a useful remedy to brand avoidance. Furthermore, the research revealed that information credibility does not moderate the relationship between consumer advocacy and brand avoidance.

Practical implications

The study findings will help practitioners in determining effective strategies to restrict and control brand avoidance.

Originality/value

The social side of consumer argumentative behavior is still an under-research area, which is addressed in the paper. This is the unique study, which explores the mediating impact of organizational feedback on consumer advocacy, brand avoidance and usefulness for society in the implicit perspective.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Shian-Yang Tzeng and Jerry Yuwen Shiu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate post-purchase regret and its relationships with complaint and risk aversion in a four-dimensional framework.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate post-purchase regret and its relationships with complaint and risk aversion in a four-dimensional framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Using 548 effective samples, this study employed structural equation modeling to test proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Based on levels of perceived self-responsibility, post-purchase regret due to forgone alternatives, under consideration and over consideration was positively associated with customer complaining, whereas post-purchase regret due to significance change exhibited no such correlation. Moreover, a higher level of risk aversion increased the effect of utilitarian motivation on post-purchase regret due to over consideration but decreased this effect on post-purchase regret due to under consideration.

Research limitations/implications

First, regret can positively influence consumer complaints. Next, consumers are unlikely to complain to third parties unless they experience strong action regret. Finally, risk aversion can alleviate or reinforce the effect of utilitarian motivation on regret. Future research could examine the customer group who feel less or no regret of their purchases to contribute to regret theory.

Practical implications

To reduce regret among such consumers, marketers are advised to apply precision marketing techniques to reach their target consumers. Second, to forestall customer regret due to forgone alternatives, sellers should proactively provide target buyers with information regarding their products and those of competing brands. Third, another method of minimizing regret is to ensure that consumers’ risk-aversion activities are effective.

Originality/value

This study empirically demonstrated a multidimensional scale of regret to illuminate the multicausal role of regret in relation to consumers’ complaining and risk-aversion behaviors.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Ragini Bhati and Harsh V. Verma

The purpose of this paper is to find out the antecedents of customer brand advocacy (CBA) on the basis of synthesis of the CBA literature. A summarisation of the results…

1493

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out the antecedents of customer brand advocacy (CBA) on the basis of synthesis of the CBA literature. A summarisation of the results of the empirical CBA studies containing CBA as a measured variable is carried out. The antecedents’ strengths of association with CBA are compared.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature is synthesised using the technique of meta-analysis (Hedges and Olkin, 1985). A total of 63 empirical research papers containing 66 data sets, published between 1988 and 2019, are analysed. For each antecedent – CBA relationship, the statistics calculated include point estimate of the reliability adjusted correlation coefficient (ρ), 95% confidence interval of the computed effect size, Cochran’s Q statistic and fail safe-N. The effect of study context as a possible moderator is assessed.

Findings

The major antecedents of CBA, identified in the study, are categorised into personal factor (opinion leadership), relational factors (brand trust, customer satisfaction, brand identification, customer-based brand equity, affective commitment and normative commitment) and social factor (normative influence). Significant heterogeneity was found across studies for the paired relationships, pointing towards the presence of theoretical and/or methodological moderators.

Originality/value

The nascent CBA literature reports mixed findings. This creates confusion. This synthesis study contributes to the present body of knowledge of the concept of CBA. It is the only study that uses the technique of meta-analysis to the CBA literature.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Kriti Priya Gupta and Harshit Maurya

This study aims to understand the role of access convenience of common service centres (CSCs) in determining the e-government continuance intention from the perspective of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the role of access convenience of common service centres (CSCs) in determining the e-government continuance intention from the perspective of citizens who are dependent on these centres for using e-government services, in developing countries such as India. The study uses the DeLone and McLean’s information systems (IS) success model as a theoretical basis and analyses the effect of access convenience of CSCs (AC), on the three quality dimensions (namely, information quality [IQ], system quality [SyQ] and service quality [SQ]), and the e-government continuance intention. The effects of the three quality dimensions on continuance intention are also analysed.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary data were collected from the field surveys conducted at various CSCs in Uttar Pradesh state of India using convenience sampling technique. The study sample included 358 respondents who use e-government services through CSCs. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypothesized relationships in the proposed model.

Findings

The findings of the study suggest that CSCs’ access convenience has a significant positive impact on the e-government continuance intention. The findings also confirm the significant positive impact on all the three quality dimensions of e-government i.e. IQ, SyQ and SQ. Though the findings do not provide support for the impact of IQ and SyQ on the e-government continuance intention but the impact of SQ on the e-government continuance intention is found to be significantly positive.

Research limitations/implications

The explanatory power of the model indicates the scope of including more variables in determining the continued usage of e-government. Future studies may extend the present study by including concepts such as trust, satisfaction and security/privacy concerns of citizens. The present study has failed to support the impact of IQ and SyQ on the intention to continue using e-government services. Future studies may test the model in different contexts with different respondents to further examine these relationships. Future studies may also see the association between the continuance intention and actual use of e-government services.

Practical implications

The government should provide accessible CSCs to the citizens which are conveniently available to them. To diffuse the e-government services successfully among all citizens, the government needs to see that sufficient numbers of CSCs are available in the areas where people lack the required infrastructure for using the e-government services. The government also needs to ensure that the CSCs are fully functional and equipped with facilities for providing the best quality services.

Originality/value

The study combines the quality constructs from the IS success model with AC, for predicting the e-government continuance intention. The joint use of these constructs has provided a model with high explanatory power, which is able to explain 76.6% variation in the continued usage of e-government services. The study also contributes to the existing literature by presenting AC as a strong determinant of the e-government quality dimensions.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 22 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

1 – 10 of 48