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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Stephen Chi-Tsun Huang and Tsui-Ju Huang

The purpose of this paper is to discuss four main research questions which are as follows: how does a consumer turn into a devoted fan? How does a devoted fan react to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss four main research questions which are as follows: how does a consumer turn into a devoted fan? How does a devoted fan react to the expansion of a human brand? What kind of strategies does a devoted fan take when facing challenges encountered by a human brand? And are devoted fans homogeneous, or can they be further divided into different subgroups?

Design/methodology/approach

The basis of grounded theory process is intensive depth interviews with 14 devoted fans of a famous Taiwanese pop singer in a qualitative manner along with content analysis of messages from online fan clubs.

Findings

Using the metaphor of kingdom to parallel the phenomenon of fandom, the research also explicates the importance of initial brand position, and the construction and expansion from the core castle – the core positioning of the human brand – to become a kingdom where devoted fans swear to be loyal to the human brand and cross-buy the derivative products of the latter. Five fan’s subgroup and a theoretical framework are obtained.

Originality/value

The theoretical framework derived in this study explicates how consumers’ initial perceptions of the human brand are formed and reinforced and how they become different kinds of fans which in turn influence the strategies they take in the face of the expansion or withdraw of the human brand.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Jay Cross

eLearning: snake oil or salvation? Changes in the world are forcing corporations to rethink how people adapt to their environment. How do people learn? Why? What's…

Abstract

eLearning: snake oil or salvation? Changes in the world are forcing corporations to rethink how people adapt to their environment. How do people learn? Why? What's eLearning? Does it work? This paper addresses these questions and recounts the history and pitfalls of computer‐based training and first‐generation eLearning. It traces the roots of CBT Systems, SmartForce, Internet Time Group, and the University of Phoenix. It takes a person to five years of TechLearn, the premier eLearning conference, from dot‐com euphoria to today's real‐time realities. The subject‐matter here is corporate learning, in particular mastering technical and social skills, and product knowledge. The focus is on learning what is required to meet the promise made to the customer. While there are parallels to collegiate education, the author lacks the experience to draw them.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Jay Cross

Corporate CEOs are finally telling the truth when they say “People are our most important assets”. Intellectual capital has become the primary factor of production. To…

Abstract

Corporate CEOs are finally telling the truth when they say “People are our most important assets”. Intellectual capital has become the primary factor of production. To raise their “corporate IQ”, managers treat workers as if they were customers of learning. This article explores why people learn much more about their jobs in the coffee room than in the classroom. It hypothesizes that equipping people intellectually to prosper will become a corporate discipline every bit as important as marketing or finance. Web services will mark the advent of workflow learning in real‐time organizations.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Bernard Scott, Simon Shurville, Piers Maclean and Chunyu Cong

This paper aims to present an approach from first principles to the design of learning experiences in interactive learning environments, that is “learning designs” in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an approach from first principles to the design of learning experiences in interactive learning environments, that is “learning designs” in the broadest sense.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is based on conversation theory (CT), a theory of learning and teaching with principled foundations in cybernetics. The approach to learning design that is proposed is not dissimilar from other approaches such as that proposed by Rowntree. However, its basis in CT provides a coherent theoretical underpinning.

Findings

Currently, in the world of e‐learning, the terms “instructional design” and “learning design” are used to refer to the application of theories of learning and instruction to the creation of e‐learning material and online learning experiences. The paper examines the roots of the two terms and discusses similarities and differences in usage. It then discusses how the processes of learning design fit into the larger processes of course, design, development and delivery. It goes on to examine the concept of a “learning design pattern”.

Originality/value

The paper contends that, whilst learning design patterns are useful as starting‐points for individual learning designs, learning designers should adopt the cybernetic principles of reflective practice – as expressed in CT – to create learning designs where received wisdom is enriched by contextual feedback from colleagues and learners.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 36 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Pramila Rao

The primary purpose of this research paper is to understand the role of national cultural dimensions on e‐learning practices in India. India is considered a major player…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this research paper is to understand the role of national cultural dimensions on e‐learning practices in India. India is considered a major player in the world economy today. US multinationals are significantly increasing their presence in India and understanding cultural preferences will help global companies transition better.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper uses the national cultural dimensions of the global leadership and organizational behavior effectiveness project, which is identified as the most topical theoretical framework on culture. The national cultural scores are used to develop hypotheses for specific cultural dimensions. Examples from the literature are also used to strengthen the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

This research proposes that national cultural dimensions of power distance, uncertainty avoidance, in‐group collectivism, and future‐orientation influence e‐learning practices. This study distinguishes between synchronous and asynchronous methods of e‐learning and the role of culture on the same. Future research can definitely empirically test the hypotheses proposed.

Practical implications

This study provides strategic implications for multinationals with a guide sheet identifying the role of the various cultural dimensions on e‐learning. The suggested strategies can be implemented by multinationals in other countries with similar national cultural dimensions also.

Originality/value

This research also proposes a theoretical e‐learning model identifying the impact of national cultural dimensions on e‐learning practices. This research also provides practitioners a strategic implications model that could be implemented for e‐learning initiatives in multinationals.

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Ulf Daniel Ehlers

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the changes taking place when learning moves from a transmissive learning model to a collaborative and reflective learning model…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the changes taking place when learning moves from a transmissive learning model to a collaborative and reflective learning model and proposes consequences for quality development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarises relevant research in the field of e‐learning to outline the differences between e‐learning 1.0 and e‐learning 2.0 and amalgamates it with a series of previously published works. The characteristics of quality development are analyses in a next step and suitable methodologies for developing quality for e‐learning 2.0 environments are selected, proposed and explained.

Findings

Even though the question of quality is controversially discussed already when e‐learning 1.0 appeared on the market, e‐learning 2.0 creates even more insecurity. This paper aims at answering the following questions: what constitutes the new, innovative element, which is described by Web 2.0 and e‐learning 2.0? Does this development have consequences for how it assures, manage and develop quality in e‐learning? In three steps, it is described what e‐learning 2.0 constitutes, which basic elements of Web 2.0 it builds on, and what has changed. In a second, step the consequences this implies for quality development in e‐learning are discussed. Third, a number of methods as examples and practical advice on how to further advance quality development are described.

Originality/value

The original value of the paper is to outline the changes which have to be taken into account in new and innovative learning environment which are build on Web 2.0 technologies and to draw consequences for quality development as well as suggest methodologies for educators and learners to improve quality of such learning environments.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Indrajit Bhattacharya and Kunal Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to make a strong case for investing in information and communication technologies (ICT) for building up of quality human resource capital for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make a strong case for investing in information and communication technologies (ICT) for building up of quality human resource capital for economic upliftment of India. An attempt has been made to explore the possibilities of online learning (OL)/e‐learning towards building up of quality human resources in higher education for a developing nation like India. A comprehensive environmental scanning of various e‐learning experiments, tools, projects to facilitate e‐learning or various institutional level efforts has been carried out. The paper also seeks to highlight the options available with traditional institutes for deploying ICT and for implementing e‐learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a descriptive account of the contemporary situation in India with regard to education especially e‐learning and draws on a variety of secondary sources both published and unpublished.

Findings

Argues that the development of e‐learning has been limited and reasons out why. The challenges of traditional face‐to‐face education vis‐à‐vis e‐learning in India are enlisted and suggestions for management of the e‐learning process by institutes which intend to venture into e‐learning are enumerated. The paper advocates the urgency for the traditional institutions to put an impetus on investment in ICT for providing e‐instruction for delivery of knowledge by riding the information super highway.

Research limitations/implications

Presents a review of literature developed from secondary sources.

Practical implications

Models of e‐learning that exclude any face‐to‐face contact may have limited prospects, but blended learning offers significant potential both on and off campus and should be pursued if the benefits of e‐learning are to be fully realized.

Originality/value

This paper provides a useful overview of a scenario of OL/e‐learning in India's higher education; and, from this summary of the present situation, goes on to suggest possible ways to transform the “digital divide” into “digital opportunities”.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2011

Lisa Chamberlin and Kay Lehmann

Twitter is a simple tool allowing users to send 140 character messages to their followers. Although the tool itself is relatively simple, the benefits of using Twitter can…

Abstract

Twitter is a simple tool allowing users to send 140 character messages to their followers. Although the tool itself is relatively simple, the benefits of using Twitter can be immense. Using Twitter educators and their students can tap into a global network of others interested in educational topics. Twitter is powerful in both range and immediacy. Students, faculty, and other university personnel including librarians are using Twitter to communicate both inside the classroom and beyond. This chapter includes how-to information for those who are new to Twitter, ways to use Twitter, tips on getting the most out of this tool, and a list of additional resources and tools which will magnify the positive effects of using Twitter.

Details

Educating Educators with Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-649-3

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Piers MacLean and Bernard Scott

The purpose of this paper is to describe research into the requirements, practice and prospects for the field of learning design and provide the findings of this study to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe research into the requirements, practice and prospects for the field of learning design and provide the findings of this study to date alongside early recommendations for furthering the profession in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the findings of a review of the literature on learning design and the study's research methodology, which comprises focus groups, an online questionnaire deployed for use in the UK, North America, Australia, telephone interviews, and surveys of higher education programmes.

Findings

Initial analysis of the data indicates that learning design professionalisation and training in the UK are behind those found in other areas of the world.

Research limitations/implications

The research was of an exploratory nature and thus limited. However, it shows that additional research into distinct aspects of learning design is required to explore further phenomena described in this paper.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that more and appropriate training opportunities are required for UK learning designers. This could be supplemented by further professionalisation of the field.

Originality/value

Key aspects are revealed in the paper of the learning design field in the UK where development is required in order to place learning design on a par with the field in other countries. These findings should be of interest to learning designers, the institutions that train them, their employers and those that use their services.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Anne Kleefstra, Michel Altan and Jol Stoffers

The hospitality industry creates a distinctive context in which learning takes place. The industry's international perspective and large globalisation play an important…

Abstract

Purpose

The hospitality industry creates a distinctive context in which learning takes place. The industry's international perspective and large globalisation play an important role in learning, as well as the operational and structural features that give meaning to learning and development in the hospitality industry. This explorative research therefore studies the relation between workplace learning and organisational performance in the Dutch hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research is done through 15 in-depth interviews with general managers and HR managers of Dutch hotels with three or more stars and at least ten employees.

Findings

It can be concluded that there is a relation between workplace learning and organisational performance in the hospitality industry, as the participants in this research and the literature both mention workplace learning enhances organisational performance.

Originality/value

Little research has been done on learning and organisational performance specifically, in the (Western) hospitality industry. This research therefore focusses on HRD and studies the influence of workplace learning on organisational performance in the Dutch hospitality industry.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

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