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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Jay Chatzkel

The purpose of this paper is to look at how the papers of the Special Issue provide a perspective for the current state of the field of intellectual capital and a departure point…

1504

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at how the papers of the Special Issue provide a perspective for the current state of the field of intellectual capital and a departure point for further research explorations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the other papers in the Special Issue and draws conclusions.

Findings

The papers composing this Special Issue are from a very broad geographical set of regions yet have the common element of being direct reflections on the implementation of intellectual capital initiatives.

Practical implications

This body of papers demonstrates that the field is maturing to one where there are existing initiatives that are in operation or in the process of implementation. The implication is that researchers will need to be aware that there is a transition in the field and to recognize that a new era of intellectual capital is under way.

Originality/value

This paper identifies three stages in the evolution of the field of intellectual capital – i.e. definitional, expansion of the theoretical basis, and implementation – and notes how the papers in this issue embody the transition to the third stage, where the focus will link to implementation.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jay Chatzkel

Provides a report of the official conference of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, held in Washington, 13‐15 March 2000. Gives an overview of the conference and…

820

Abstract

Provides a report of the official conference of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, held in Washington, 13‐15 March 2000. Gives an overview of the conference and specifically of the four recipients of the Baldrige Award. Notes that leadership in its many forms was a key factor for all these companies. Looks in depth at each of the companies in turn.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Jay Chatzkel

The Braintrust 2003 Conference gave ground to the sense that the knowledge movement is struggling to gain new levels of maturity. Sessions explored the business implications of…

676

Abstract

The Braintrust 2003 Conference gave ground to the sense that the knowledge movement is struggling to gain new levels of maturity. Sessions explored the business implications of knowledge, focusing on the use of knowledge in workflow, in mergers and acquisitions, and in recognizing the need to go to the periphery to grasp trends and emerging ideas. It is significant that knowledge management, change management and business management began to be woven together in these presentations. The presentations at Braintrust delineated that the challenge to KM practitioners is first, to be better and more related to business needs while second, staying continually sensitive to changes that may potentially sweep their organizations, leading to fundamental shifts in how the organization and its supporting knowledge effort need to relate to the world.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

John Dumay

The purpose of this paper is to review and critique the current status of intellectual capital (IC) research as published in the Journal of Intellectual Capital (JIC) as it heads…

3260

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and critique the current status of intellectual capital (IC) research as published in the Journal of Intellectual Capital (JIC) as it heads into its 15th year with a view to understanding the past and possible direction of future IC research.

Design/methodology/approach

Articles published in the JIC are reviewed building on prior IC research and analysis by Guthrie et al. (2012) and Dumay and Garanina (2013). To help understand the impact of articles in the JIC the analysis is supplemented by including citation data from google scholar, journal impact data from the SCImago Journal & Country Rank portal, and the 2013 Australian Business Dean's Council (ABDC) journal ranking list. Also included is commentary from the JIC's senior editors based on their responses to questions asked via e-mail relating to their involvement in, and the future of, the JIC.

Findings

The JIC faces a challenge as it is most recognised as an accounting journal despite its focus on managing IC. The research published in the JIC is multidisciplinary as it comes from a wide range of perspectives. However, there appears to be a paucity of research emanating from different perspectives, most notably from North American academics, and a lack of focus on the private and public sectors. However, new perspectives of IC, especially that associated with IC praxis and the third stage of IC research are emerging as transformational opportunities for future IC research, along with the opportunity to experiment with transdisciplinary research.

Originality/value

The paper presents a comprehensive critical review of the articles published in the JIC along with measuring the impact of the articles using citation data from google scholar. Using this approach, the type of research and its impacts can be simultaneously assessed to offer insights into future transformational IC research opportunities, and how IC researchers and the JIC can also be transformational.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Umesh Bamel, Vijay Pereira, Manlio Del Giudice and Yama Temouri

This paper examines the leading publication trends including the extent and impact of intellectual capital research in the Journal of Intellectual Capital (JIC) over a two-decade…

1389

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the leading publication trends including the extent and impact of intellectual capital research in the Journal of Intellectual Capital (JIC) over a two-decade period (2000–2020). The bibliometric analysis offers the description of publications trends such as key authors, articles, cited references, institutions and countries— in other words the extent and impact in the field. This paper also presents the knowledge structure (including conceptual, intellectual and social structures) of JIC, that is prominent themes, co-citation and bibliographic networks.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to achieve research objectives, we collected the bibliographic information of the articles published in JIC for the period 2000 to 2020 from the Scopus database on 11.04.2020. The bibliographic information of 737 documents were analysed using to open source analysis tool, that is bibliometrics package in r software and VOSviewer. These tools were used to create the graphical visualization of bibliographic data on basis of co-occurrence, co-citation and bibliographic coupling.

Findings

The results show that the journal is progressing in terms of publication quantity and reputation in the field. To date, 737 documents have been published in JIC, which includes 659 research articles, eight editorials, seven notes and 63 review papers. This paper also portrays the author impact list in terms of most impactful articles published in JIC. Country-wise Italy, Australia, and USA exert maximum influence on JIC scholarship.

Originality/value

Bibliographic analysis offers a comprehensive understanding of past trends and presents the future direction of a journal.

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Artie W. Ng, Jay Chatzkel, K.F. Lau and Douglas Macbeth

China's emerging multinationals (CEMs) have gained attention for their increasing activities in mergers and acquisitions (M&As) within the global arena. Harnessing previous…

6656

Abstract

Purpose

China's emerging multinationals (CEMs) have gained attention for their increasing activities in mergers and acquisitions (M&As) within the global arena. Harnessing previous studies about the significance of their cultural baggage and an underlying strategic intent in reverse technology transfer through cross‐border M&As, the purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamics of CEMs in their process of cross‐border M&As through the perspectives of intellectual capital.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on an interdisciplinary literature review, a theoretical framework is devised to exemplify such dynamics within a CEM during the course of reverse technology transfer and swift transformation into a global enterprise for technological innovation through M&As. A longitudinal case study is adopted to examine how two technology‐based CEMs continue to modify and reconfigure their respective committed intellectual capital resources while undergoing cross‐border M&A transactions.

Findings

The study suggests the relevance of a conceptual framework and unveils a causal development of dynamic capabilities that is evidenced by resource reconfiguration and post‐merger performance. It further reveals a reinforced dynamic capability development process that would enhance reverse technology transfer for domestic rather than overseas market development while pursuing equilibrium of knowledge.

Originality/value

This is an original paper that explores the cultural dynamics of CEMs and what influences their intellectual capital development during their cross‐border M&As. This paper articulates that CEMs need to create their own unique intellectual capital that contributes constructively to their international operations throughout their post‐merger integrations.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Jay Chatzkel

A conversation with Hubert Saint‐Onge, senior vice‐president for Strategic Capabilities at Clarica Life Insurance Company focusing on knowledge strategy and its implementation at…

933

Abstract

A conversation with Hubert Saint‐Onge, senior vice‐president for Strategic Capabilities at Clarica Life Insurance Company focusing on knowledge strategy and its implementation at Clarica, a large, knowledge‐driven financial services organization, where intangible assets are the most valuable assets. Saint‐Onge discusses how he reformulated the traditional human resources function into the new configuration called strategic capabilities which links strategy and performance. This new mandate takes into account both the greater importance of intangible assets and the principles related to leveraging organizational learning and knowledge. Saint‐Onge discusses how the strategic capabilities approach reframes the roles of people, technology, values, leadership and measurement in creating an evolving “sense and respond” organization. He emphasizes continuing the shifting of Clarica’s member workforce from a dependency to a self‐initiating orientation as a key requirement for ongoing success in this knowledge‐driven transformation.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Jay Chatzkel

In this conversation, Alex Bennet explores the operating principles and practices of how the Knowledge Centric Organization was developed at the US Department of the Navy. Ms…

841

Abstract

In this conversation, Alex Bennet explores the operating principles and practices of how the Knowledge Centric Organization was developed at the US Department of the Navy. Ms Bennet served as the Chief Knowledge Officer for the US Department of the Navy from 1998 to 2002, where she pioneered and designed and led the development of the Navy’s enterprise‐wide Knowledge Centric Organization (KCO) effort. The US Department of the Navy was the only public sector organization to be recognized as a world class leader in managing knowledge to deliver superior performance in the 2002 North American Most Admired Knowledge Enterprise (MAKE) study.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jay Chatzkel

Conversations create the wealth of knowledge organizations. This conversation with Jim Botkin explores a variety of issues on how knowledge is changing how organizations create…

525

Abstract

Conversations create the wealth of knowledge organizations. This conversation with Jim Botkin explores a variety of issues on how knowledge is changing how organizations create value as knowledge‐based enterprises. Jim Botkin argues that the knowledge framework is actually the larger context for organizations and that e‐business is actually a subset of its operations. Botkin also shares how knowledge has come to be a new factor of production in organizations. This is true for both “new economy” organizations and “old economy” legacy organizations. Even so, the acceptance of the knowledge movement is still tentative. The very name “knowledge management” still often implies information technology “applications” to key organizational visionaries and is not always well received. The controversies over nurturing knowledge communities within the framework of knowledge initiatives are also examined in the dialogue.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Bernard Marr and Jay Chatzkel

This introductory editorial to the special issue “IC at the crossroads: theory and research” explains the rationale and background to the studies. In addition it outlines reasons…

3357

Abstract

This introductory editorial to the special issue “IC at the crossroads: theory and research” explains the rationale and background to the studies. In addition it outlines reasons why the field of intellectual (IC) capital is at the crossroads. It seems that awareness of the importance of IC has been created. It is now the role of researchers as well as practitioners to move to the next level. This next level involves issues around taxonomies as well as research methodologies. In order to move on, precise definitions of concepts such as IC, better justifications of why organizations need to measure and manage IC, and increased clarity about terms such as measurement, assessment, or valuation are needed. In addition, more rigorous research methods are needed in order to test and validate existing theories in the field.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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