Search results

1 – 10 of 45
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Francisco Javier Carrillo, Bo Edvardsson, Javier Reynoso and Egren Maravillo

This paper aims to deepen the understanding of resource integration for value co-creation within service-dominant logic (SDL), by drawing on key knowledge management (KM) concepts.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deepen the understanding of resource integration for value co-creation within service-dominant logic (SDL), by drawing on key knowledge management (KM) concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual study introduces three key KM concepts, namely, object, agent and context to SDL; thus, deepening the understanding of how resources are becoming when actors are engaged in co-creating value-in-context.

Findings

This paper extends understanding of actors’ uses of knowledge in their efforts to co-create value. Paradoxically, SDL takes a phenomenological approach to understanding value co-creation, whereas KM embraces a realist-phenomenological view. Emphasizing knowing rather than knowledge reveals that there is no object without an agent, no agency without context and no knowledge without value-alignment. Thus, the paper contributes to theorizing about resource integration through SDL by identifying the need for effective alignment between relevant objects, capable agents and meaningful contexts for value to emerge. The paper also contributes with four facilitators of object-agent-context alignment: tacit knowledge contextualization, collective sensemaking, shared values among engaged actors and feedback on alignment effectiveness.

Originality/value

It advances current conceptualizations of resource integration and value co-creation in SDL by paying explicit attention to a KM perspective.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Aku Valtakoski, Javier Reynoso, Daniel Maranto, Bo Edvardsson and Egren Maravillo Cabrera

The purpose of this paper is to test how national culture may help to explain cross-country differences in new service development (NSD) by comparing the impact of NSD…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test how national culture may help to explain cross-country differences in new service development (NSD) by comparing the impact of NSD success factors between Mexico and Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight hypotheses based on prior literature on NSD and national culture were tested using covariance-based structural equation modeling and survey data from 210 Mexican and 173 Swedish firms.

Findings

Launch proficiency and customer interaction had a positive impact on NSD performance with no difference between the two cultures. NSD process formalization did not have clear positive impact on NSD performance but had a statistically significantly stronger impact in the structured culture (Mexico). Team empowerment affected NSD performance positively, but the difference between cultures was non-significant.

Research limitations/implications

The impact of national culture depends on the type of NSD success factor. Some factors are unaffected by the cultural context, while factors congruent with the national culture enhance performance. Factors incongruent with national culture may even hurt NSD performance.

Practical implications

When choosing priorities in NSD improvement, managers need to consider the national culture environment.

Originality/value

Paper directly tests how national culture moderates NSD performance using primary data. Findings suggest that the effects of NSD success factors are contingent on congruence with national culture.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Javier Reynoso and Karla Cabrera

This paper aims to explore and learn about managerial practices of informal services at the base of the pyramid (BoP).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore and learn about managerial practices of informal services at the base of the pyramid (BoP).

Design/methodology/approach

The study reports findings of an empirical research conducted in 16 cities in Mexico during a two-year period. Managerial practices in 327 micro-businesses were identified and analyzed after conducting direct observation and personal interviews with owners, employees and customers of these BoP informal service businesses.

Findings

The paper shows that managerial practices of BoP informal service micro-businesses are developed through a dynamic, integrated network of owner, employees and customers who integrate scarce resources building win-win-win relationships to satisfy their basic daily needs.

Practical implications

The creation and management of a BoP informal service business is mainly a matter of satisfying basic needs, aiming to positively transform a community by improving well-being. This paper provides insights to understand those relationships and interactions among the main actors involved, highlighting the need to identify and integrate the BoP service management cycle to better address their needs.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a conceptual service management framework for informal micro-businesses at the BoP integrating the owners, employees and customers’ perspectives. Three corresponding cycles are identified and discussed, which are useful to elicit relevant characteristics of key roles, activities, interactions and relationships taking place in informal services.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Tiina Tuominen, Bo Edvardsson and Javier Reynoso

This study aims to understand and explain how institutional change occurs at the level of value co-creation practices in service ecosystems. Despite the centrality of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand and explain how institutional change occurs at the level of value co-creation practices in service ecosystems. Despite the centrality of collective practices to the service ecosystems perspective, theoretically grounded explanations of how practices change and become institutionalized remain underdeveloped. Applying the theory of routine dynamics, this paper addresses two questions as follows: what does the institutional change mean at the level of value co-creation practices and what processes underlie these changes?

Design/methodology/approach

The study develops a conceptual framework that characterizes value co-creation practices as routines involving three aspects, namely, ostensive, performative and artifactual. As a key element in institutional change, the interplay between these informs an account of institutional change processes in service ecosystems.

Findings

The proposed conceptual framework specifies the conditions for institutional change in terms of value co-creation routines. First, any such change is seen to be grounded in alignment between changing institutional rules and the ostensive, performative and artifactual aspects of routines. Second, this alignment is seen to emerge through a dialectics of planned and practice-based activities during institutional change. An empirical research agenda is proposed for the analysis of institutional change processes in different service ecosystems.

Originality/value

This conceptual framework extends existing accounts of how service ecosystems change through the contributions of multiple actors at the level of value co-creation practices.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Elina Jaakkola, Thomas Meiren, Lars Witell, Bo Edvardsson, Adrienne Schäfer, Javier Reynoso, Roberta Sebastiani and Doris Weitlaner

The extant new service development (NSD) literature tends to assume that the key practices for NSD identified in one context apply for all services, and has failed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The extant new service development (NSD) literature tends to assume that the key practices for NSD identified in one context apply for all services, and has failed to sufficiently consider differences in NSD between service types. The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of NSD across different service types.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive, cross-sectoral survey was conducted in seven countries. Data from 1,333 NSD projects were analyzed to empirically derive a service typology and examine if and how different types of services vary in terms of NSD resources, practices, methods, and results.

Findings

Based on six service characteristics, the study identifies four service types: routine-intensive, technology-intensive, contact-intensive, and knowledge-intensive services. The study also identifies specific NSD resources, practices, methods, and results that are prevalent across the service typology. The evidence indicates that the use of advanced practices and methods differs dramatically between service types.

Practical implications

The paper enables practitioners to expand their current understanding on NSD by providing insights into the variability of NSD across service types. The results suggest that either service-type-specific models or a configurable model for NSD should be developed.

Originality/value

This study provides one of the first empirically derived service typologies for NSD. The study demonstrates that NSD resources, practices, methods, and results differ across service types, thereby challenging the “one size fits all” assumption evident in current NSD research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Laura Di Pietro, Bo Edvardsson, Javier Reynoso, Maria Francesca Renzi, Martina Toni and Roberta Guglielmetti Mugion

The purpose of this paper is to explore why innovative service ecosystems scale up, using a service-dominant logic lens. The focus is on identifying the key drivers of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why innovative service ecosystems scale up, using a service-dominant logic lens. The focus is on identifying the key drivers of the scaling-up process as the basis for a new conceptual framework on the scaling up of service innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive research design is used to zoom in on two innovative service ecosystems, Eataly and KidZania, to identify the key drivers that can explain why innovations scale up. For both companies, the triangulation of semi-structured interviews, archival sources and in-store observations is used as complementary data sets. Multiple investigators and multiple coders have been involved in the data collection, coding process and analysis.

Findings

An extended conceptualization of service innovation is obtained, grounded in a framework of four drivers of scaling up: effectuation as the basis for creating the value proposition; sensing and adapting to local contexts; the reconfiguration and alignment of resources and forms for collaboration between actors; and values’ resonance.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the first empirical investigations of the key drivers of the scaling up process of service innovations. The paper contributes with a conceptualization of service innovation and why scaling-up processes emerge, emphasizing the existence of multiple constellations of four drivers.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Elodie Jouny-Rivier, Javier Reynoso and Bo Edvardsson

This paper aims to identify and analyze factors that determine firms’ commitment to co-create new services with business customers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify and analyze factors that determine firms’ commitment to co-create new services with business customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study based on a scenario method, involving an online survey of French service companies, reveals the determinants of commitment to service co-creation.

Findings

Customer benefits and organizational sacrifices, as well as firm-related factors (specialization, partners’ involvement and innovativeness) correlate with firms’ commitment to co-create new services. The proposed, empirically grounded model details factors that determine firms’ commitment to co-create new services with business customers, including innovative culture as a key determinant.

Practical implications

The identified factors that affect firms’ commitment to co-create services can guide managers’ efforts to improve customer relationships and thus their service innovation processes.

Originality/value

This study identifies and analyzes characteristics of committed firms, as well as the benefits and sacrifices they face in co-creating new services, in a novel way. Thus, it helps define the fit between a service offering and business customers’ participation in new service development contexts.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Raymond P P. Fisk, Laurel Anderson, David E. Bowen, Thorsten Gruber, Amy Ostrom, Lia Patrício, Javier Reynoso and Roberta Sebastiani

The purpose of this paper is to create a movement within the service research community that aspires to help the billions of impoverished people across the world achieve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to create a movement within the service research community that aspires to help the billions of impoverished people across the world achieve better service from each other, from their communities, from corporations, from their governments, and from nongovernmental organizations. The authors believe every human being is worthy of being served properly. To achieve this purpose, understanding and learning from this huge low-income segment of society known as the base of the pyramid (BoP) is essential. There are myths about the BoP that need to be dispelled and there is a fundamental lack of service research on this important problem.

Design/methodology/approach

The existence of an extensive BoP literature combined with service research priorities has called attention to drafting research agendas. Human service systems are explored historically and systems theory provides a perspective for understanding and reducing poverty. Transformative service research, service design research, and community action research are presented to illustrate three research approaches that can contribute to understanding and then better serving the needs of the neglected billions of humanity.

Findings

First, the authors present a practical and meaningful call to action by making the case for the service research community to contribute to poverty alleviation with the creation of fresh ideas and research agendas. Second, the authors describe the ample opportunity for conducting service research in and with the BoP and thereby expanding service knowledge about the BoP. Third, the authors suggest a number of approaches for service researchers to join this new movement and help improve the well-being of billions of impoverished people.

Social implications

Most existing service research comes from highly developed Anglo-Saxon countries and concerns the service problems of customers in affluent societies. Therefore, there is a fundamental lack of service research at the BoP. The social implications are truly global. Poverty is a global service system problem that can be reduced. Effective poverty alleviation solutions in one part of the world can be adapted to other parts of the world.

Originality/value

This paper is a new and very original call to action to the service research community. First, with the exception of a few previous manuscripts calling for research on the BoP, this is the first time a collaborative effort has been made to start systematically changing this knowledge gap. Second, the service research community has never worked on a project of this magnitude. The authors hope to offer a role model to other academic communities as to how to marshal their resources to have a collective, positive impact on the well-being of the world’s impoverished.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Heiko Gebauer, Guang‐Jie Ren, Aku Valtakoski and Javier Reynoso

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of key research contributions on the topic of service strategies in manufacturing by focusing on descriptions of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of key research contributions on the topic of service strategies in manufacturing by focusing on descriptions of the phenomenon and theoretical explanations of its evolution and financial consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

A summary analysis of the extant literature is provided. Valuable contributions and fundamental methodological issues are identified and discussed. Challenges, limitations and directions for future research avenues are also highlighted.

Findings

As a result of the analysis and discussion presented, the concept of service‐driven manufacturing is integrated through the provision, evolution and impact of services in industrial settings.

Practical implications

The paper contains guidelines for manufacturing managers interested in the evolution from products to services in different industries.

Originality/value

The paper is expected to be used as a relevant source of ideas and guidance for all those interested in doing research in services strategies in manufacturing.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Soumaya Ben Letaifa and Javier Reynoso

The purpose of this paper is to combine service-dominant logic premises with ecosystem characteristics in the base of the pyramid (BoP) environment, aiming to establish…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to combine service-dominant logic premises with ecosystem characteristics in the base of the pyramid (BoP) environment, aiming to establish the foundations of a new service ecosystem framework for BoP contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is developed by connecting service logic with an ecosystem perspective, developing theoretical propositions for sustainable service ecosystems at the BoP, and identifying future research direction using this new framework.

Findings

The paper first highlights main challenges faced in the BoP environment. It then constructs an ecosystem framework for BoP contexts composed by four theoretical propositions: first, need to shift from a top-down to a multi-actor BoP approach; second, need of social embeddedness for successful BoP initiatives; third, service co-creation for and with local communities with actors playing multiple social roles; and fourth, multi-actor and multi-dimensional value creation. Future research directions are identified related to these propositions.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretical propositions integrating the service ecosystem framework need further exploration and confirmation with additional empirical studies.

Practical implications

Proposed framework and propositions provide useful insights for practitioners from different types of organizations aiming to participate in BoP markets.

Social implications

Understanding the need to integrate a service ecosystem perspective in BoP contexts is fundamental to better address the needs of all actors involved.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework proposed offers a comprehensive, multi-dimensional, and multi-actor perspective on how to understand, and better address services in BoP contexts. Future research avenues identified offer a more inclusive agenda for increasing service knowledge at the BoP.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

1 – 10 of 45