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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Jasvinder Sidhu, Peta Stevenson-Clarke, Mahesh Joshi and Abdel Halabi

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical account of four unsuccessful merger attempts between Australia’s two major professional accounting bodies over a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical account of four unsuccessful merger attempts between Australia’s two major professional accounting bodies over a 30-year period (1969 to 1998), each of which ultimately failed. An analysis of the commonalities and differences across the four attempts is provided and social identity theory is used to explain the differences between members level of support for these merger bids.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a qualitative approach using a historical research methodology to source surviving business records from public archives and other data gathered from oral history interviews.

Findings

The study found that, across all four merger attempts between Australia’s two professional accounting bodies, there was strong support from society members (the perceived lower-status group) and opposition exhibited by institute members (the perceived higher-status group). This study also found that the perceived higher-status organisation always initiated merger discussions, while its members rejected the proposals in the members’ vote.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focusses on the Australian accounting profession, considering a historical account of merger attempts. Further research is required that includes interviews and surveys of those involved in making decisions regarding merger attempts.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to examine in detail these four unsuccessful merger attempts between the largest accounting organisations in Australia.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Sukhdev Singh, Jasvinder Sidhu, Mahesh Joshi and Monika Kansal

The purpose of this paper is to measure the intellectual capital performance of Indian banks and established a relationship between intellectual capital and return on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the intellectual capital performance of Indian banks and established a relationship between intellectual capital and return on assets (ROA). The paper also compared the intellectual capital performance of public sector and private sector banks.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on secondary data from the top 20 Indian banks. Ten banks were selected from each of the public and private sectors on the basis of paid-up equity capital. The analysis was made using the value added intellectual coefficient, the coefficient of variation, exponential growth rates, trend analysis, Yule’s coefficient, the coefficient of correlation, the F-test and the t-test.

Findings

The study revealed that private sectors have performed relatively better regarding the creation of total information coefficient (IC). However, the ROA was still below the international benchmark of > 1 percent. The major cause of the lower IC and the reduced ROA is disproportionate to the increase in capital employed and escalating non-performing assets in the Indian banking sector.

Practical implications

The study focussed on managers and identified the causes of lower performance. It proposed numerous strategies to improve the aggregate score of IC, which is closely related to bank profitability.

Originality/value

This is the first study to make a comparative analysis of intellectual capital performance in public and private sector banks in India and in addition to the traditional style of measuring sectoral performance. Further, the study employed new statistical tools, such as Yule’s coefficient of association, to establish the association between performance variables.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Mahesh Joshi, Daryll Cahill and Jasvinder Sidhu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the intellectual capital (IC) performance of Australian banks for the period 2005‐2007. It also aims to examine the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the intellectual capital (IC) performance of Australian banks for the period 2005‐2007. It also aims to examine the relationship amongst various constituents of IC performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The value added intellectual coefficient (VAIC™) approach developed by Pulic is used to determine the IC performance of the Australian banks. The required data to calculate different constituents of IC was obtained from the annual reports of Australian banks.

Findings

The paper reveals that VAIC™ has a significant relation with human costs and the value addition made by the Australian banks. All Australian owned banks have relatively higher human capital efficiency than capital employed efficiency and structural capital efficiency. The size of the bank in terms of total assets, total number of employees and total shareholders equity has little or no impact on the IC performance of the Australian owned banks.

Research limitations/implications

The paper analyses IC performance of only 11 Australian owned banks. However, the more than 90 per cent market share enjoyed by these banks still promises a degree of validation of the results of the paper from the Australian perspective or similar banking structure in some countries.

Practical implications

The findings may serve as a useful input for bankers to apply knowledge management in their institutions and in addressing the factors affecting IC performance in order to maximise their value creation. The findings of the study would also provide some information to the stakeholders and potential investors to assess the value creation capabilities of this group of banks.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that examines the relationship of VAIC™ and the size of the firms for Australian owned banks in Australia.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Mahesh Joshi, Daryll Cahill, Jasvinder Sidhu and Monika Kansal

The purpose of this paper is to examine the intellectual capital (IC) performance of the Australian Financial Sector for the period 2006‐2008. It also aims to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the intellectual capital (IC) performance of the Australian Financial Sector for the period 2006‐2008. It also aims to examine the relationship between IC performance and the financial performance of the financial sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The value added intellectual coefficient (VAIC) approach developed by Pulic is used to determine the IC performance of the Australian financial sector. The required data to calculate different constituents of IC was obtained from the annual reports of Australian Financial Sector companies.

Findings

The value creation capability of financial sector in Australia is highly influenced by human capital. About two thirds of the sample companies have very low levels of intellectual capital efficiency. The performance of various components of VAIC and overall VAIC differs across all subsectors in the financial sector. Investment companies have high value VAIC due to higher a level of human capital efficiency, as compared to banks, insurance companies, diversified financials and RIETs. Insurance companies are more focussed on physical capital rather than human and structural capital leading to lower VAIC.

Research limitations/implications

The paper analyses IC performance of only one sector of the Australian economy and there is a relatively narrow three‐year period for the data collection. However, a comparative analysis of various sub sectors in the Australian financial sector justifies the contributions made by this study.

Practical implications

The findings may serve as a useful input for financial institutions to apply knowledge management in their institutions and in addressing the factors affecting IC performance in order to maximise their value creation. It will also help the management of companies in other sectors, especially those in knowledge‐based industries, in understanding the contributions of various components of intellectual capital in their growth.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that examines the relationship of intellectual capital performance with financial performance of financial sector companies in Australia.

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Mahesh Joshi, Dharminder Singh Ubha and Jasvinder Sidhu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and compare the voluntary reporting of intellectual capital (IC) by the top 20 software and technology sector companies in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and compare the voluntary reporting of intellectual capital (IC) by the top 20 software and technology sector companies in a developing nation, India, and a developed nation, Australia. The paper aims to highlight the differences in IC disclosure practices of the companies operating in two different economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates the top 20 firms by market capitalisation listed on the Bombay Stock Exchange in India and the Australian Stock Exchange in Australia in the year 2007‐2008. Using the content analysis method, the paper reviews the annual reports of these firms to determine IC disclosure trends in India and Australia. Statistical tools and graphs have been used to compare and contrast ICD disclosures in two countries.

Findings

The study has identified IC disclosure differences between Indian and Australian firms, and reports disclosures by Indian companies are on a higher scale than Australian Software and Technology Sector companies. However, Levels of voluntary IC disclosure are found to be low in both the nations and most of the disclosures are declarative in nature.

Research limitations/implications

This lack of consistency in reporting practices makes comparisons across countries difficult. The paper emphasises the need for a uniform and consistent framework for the reporting of intellectual capital items.

Practical implications

The results of this exploratory study on the knowledge based industrial sector can be used by researchers to explore different types of IC reporting initiatives pursued across specifically knowledge based industrial sectors.

Originality/value

This study offers insights into comparative trends in IC disclosure practices of software and technology sector companies operating in a developed and a developing country.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Robin Roslender

Abstract

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

Godfred Kesse Oppong, Jamini Kanta Pattanayak and Mohd. Irfan

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the effect of intellectual capital (IC) efficiency on changes in the productivity of insurance companies in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the effect of intellectual capital (IC) efficiency on changes in the productivity of insurance companies in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a panel of 33 insurance companies from 2008 to 2016, the study applied Value Added Intellectual Coefficients model as a measure of IC efficiency, whilst Malmquist Productivity Index is employed to capture changes in the productivity of insurance companies. In estimating the effects of IC on productivity, System Generalised Method of Moment (GMM) is applied because of its power over endogeneity and heteroscedasticity.

Findings

Robust empirical findings on productivity analysis showed that improvements in insurer’s productivity were experienced in three year intervals out of the overall studied year. In addition, panel regression results revealed that IC along with human capital and capital employed significantly affect the productivity of insurance companies.

Research limitations/implications

The generalisability of the study findings could be questioned because it is limited to insurance firms operating in Ghana; some firms were omitted due to mergers and acquisition that reduced the final sample. Yet, the findings facilitate the validation of IC concept and, hence, informs manager/policy makers on IC utilisation as a source of competitive edge.

Practical implications

Having robust empirical findings, the study expands on the existing literature by unveiling the dynamic nature of IC relationship and productivity. The findings also serve as a benchmark for managers/policymakers in insurance companies to increase the operational efficiency by investing in IC, which will help guarantee improve returns on generated premiums.

Originality/value

Although a few studies have investigated the effect of IC in Ghana, this study is the first to examine the dynamic relationship between IC and changes in productivity in a Ghanaian context.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Francisca Castilla-Polo and Consuelo Ruiz-Rodríguez

In this paper, the authors analyze the use of content analysis in disclosing voluntarily information on intangible assets, the intangible assets disclosures (IAD). The…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors analyze the use of content analysis in disclosing voluntarily information on intangible assets, the intangible assets disclosures (IAD). The purpose of this paper is to conduct a structured literature review (SLR) that assesses the possibilities and limitations of content analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

To that end, the authors analyze the existing literature on the topic in the main international databases. In all, 74 empirical articles utilizing content analysis as a research methodology for IAD were reviewed. Regarding the selection of sources, the authors should indicate that the SLR performed includes academic studies published in journals or presented at conferences and that are always subject to a double process of anonymous review.

Findings

The obtained results indicate that despite the frequent use of content analysis in studies on IAD, its use does not meet all expectations.

Research limitations/implications

The study synthesizes the research on content analysis for the case of information on intangible assets, offering an updated and global framework for future researchers through the SLR.

Practical implications

Among other problems, the authors found its excessive emphasis on the amount disclosed in the annual report, ignoring other reports in which more information regarding intangible assets is available, such as in the case of the sustainability reports. Furthermore, the use of very different coding systems and its exclusive use without being combined with other methodologies are detected. These aspects affect the quality problems of the sources used, which directly results in the utility of the evidenced findings.

Social implications

These conclusions allow the authors to conclude on the need to open different lines of study that review the use of content analysis in this topic.

Originality/value

The work focuses on the quality of disclosures more so than on the quantity, offering a critical view that summarizes the utility of the employment of content analysis for this type of disclosure and its implications for future research on this topic. Despite previous studies, the authors highlight the new insights revealed from IAD research, especially since the seminal paper of Dumay and Cai (2014).

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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