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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Christo Boshoff and Jason Leong

The production of most services depends heavily on human involvement which, by definition, implies variability. The difficulty of standardising human behaviour during…

Abstract

The production of most services depends heavily on human involvement which, by definition, implies variability. The difficulty of standardising human behaviour during service delivery at a level expected by customers is exacerbated by the simultaneity of production and consumption. When service failures occur, the presence of customers leaves little scope for corrective action without the customer being aware of the mishap. The difficulty in avoiding visible service failures does not have to result in dissatisfied customers, however. Service firms can go a long way towards turning dissatisfied customers who have had a negative service experience into ones who are likely to remain loyal to the firm. That, however, requires an effective service recovery programme. This study pursued two objectives. The empirical results show that attribution (the firm accepting blame) is, relatively speaking, the dimension most important to customers in their assessment of the service recovery effort, followed by empowerment and apology. Once a service failure has occurred, customers prefer to deal with staff who are empowered to solve their problem quickly and they do not want to hear that someone else is to blame. An apology in person or, alternatively, by telephone is preferable. Surprisingly, pre‐service failure perceptions do not influence the customer’s satisfaction with the recovery effort, suggesting that service recovery is situation‐specific.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Jeffrey Boon Hui Yap, Ban Leong Lim, Martin Skitmore and Jason Gray

Poor project knowledge and inadequate experience are frequently linked to construction time-cost overruns. This paper aims to expound on the criticality of project…

Abstract

Purpose

Poor project knowledge and inadequate experience are frequently linked to construction time-cost overruns. This paper aims to expound on the criticality of project knowledge and experience in the successful delivery of projects in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a detailed literature review, a quantitative positivist approach with a questionnaire survey involving industry professionals is used to appraise the 30 prevalent causes of time-cost overruns according to frequency, effectiveness and importance indices. The data are then subjected to Spearman’s rank correlation tests and exploratory factor analysis.

Findings

Using the importance index, which assimilates both frequency and effectiveness indices, the criticality of knowledge and experience in the overall context is seen as fundamental for addressing the contractor’s faulty planning and scheduling, construction mistakes and defective work, site management and supervision, delayed/slow decision-making, incomplete drawings and design documents and change/variation orders. Spearman’s rank correlation tests indicate a good consensus of perceptions among the key parties involved. Next, an exploratory factor analysis uncovers six underlying knowledge-based factors affecting construction performance, relating to inaccurate resource estimates, design changes, resource shortages, lack of experience, incompetence and mistakes and defects.

Originality/value

The study draws out the repercussions of the hitherto limited research into the deficiencies in knowledge and experience in undertaking construction projects to enhance performance using knowledge management functions.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Book part
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Peter Curwen and Jason Whalley

Abstract

Details

Understanding 5G Mobile Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-036-8

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Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2021

Heather J. Forbes, Jenee Vickers Johnson and Jason C. Travers

The innovations in this volume instill a sense of optimism about how special education professionals might improve outcomes for students with disabilities. Although many…

Abstract

The innovations in this volume instill a sense of optimism about how special education professionals might improve outcomes for students with disabilities. Although many interventions illustrate scientific progress toward an evidence-based profession, many special educators may find it challenging to discriminate between scientifically validated innovation and various fads. While innovation reflects the gradual progress of science, fads usually arise suddenly and lack an evidentiary foundation. Some fads may persist over time but without supportive evidence. We present several reasons why we believe special educators adopt fad interventions during an era when scientifically validated special educational practices are readily available. We propose that fads and similar unsubstantiated practices likely will be a persistent problem for special educators. A conservative and judicious approach to adopting “the next big thing” therefore seems important to an evidence-based special education.

Details

The Next Big Thing in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-749-7

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Vicki S. Collet

This collective case study investigated the ways in which coaching supports teacher change. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to consider what types of feedback…

Abstract

Purpose

This collective case study investigated the ways in which coaching supports teacher change. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to consider what types of feedback are best at what times in the coaching process and how coaching supports teachers’ application of learning to differing contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted over an 18-month period in three settings: a university reading clinic and two schools. Participants were a coach and two in-service teachers enrolled in a literacy specialist master’s degree program. This qualitative study included observational field notes, interviews, lesson plans, and teacher reflections as primary data sources.

Findings

Findings suggest a model for coaching that acknowledges the learner’s previous knowledge and experience and continuously gauges support to stay within the ever-escalating zone of proximal development. Specific coaching moves that vary by degree of scaffolding are identified, namely: modeling, recommending, asking questions, affirming, and praising.

Research limitations/implications

This study clarifies the varying roles that coaches may play and how these roles change over time. Additionally, the model has implications for how coaching might change based on variability among those being coached.

Originality/value

The Gradual Increase of Responsibility Model has potential to guide coaches as they engage with mentees to improve instruction.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Peggy M.L. Ng, Jason K. Y. Chan, Tai Ming Wut, Man Fung Lo and Irene Szeto

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model to examine key employability skills that match workplace requirements and foster employability.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model to examine key employability skills that match workplace requirements and foster employability.

Design/methodology/approach

This research comprises a cross-sectional study from self-financing institutions in Hong Kong. The current study adopted structural equation modeling to examine key employability skills that match workplace requirements and foster employability.

Findings

Based on the empirical findings, the acquired employability skills of young graduates are entrepreneurship, professional development, work with others, self-management, communication and problem solving. Moreover, higher education institutions should work closely with industry stakeholders to get employers engaged with the work-integrating learning (WIL) programs and subsequently equip young graduates for better employability opportunities. In connection with employer engagement, employability skills of communication, problem solving and self-management would be improved. Furthermore, entrepreneurship and problem-solving skills could further be developed for young graduating students working in SME organizations during WIL.

Originality/value

As a notable gap exists in the current literature to examine young graduates' key employability skills in the context and content of Hong Kong self-financing tertiary education, this research explores key employability skills of self-financed young graduates and the relative importance of employability skills across company size using a quantitative approach.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Jeffrey Boon Hui Yap, Martin Skitmore, Yi Wen Lim, Siaw-Chuing Loo and Jason Gray

Quantity surveying is a profession that blends engineering, construction and economics. To be competent is to have the ability to apply the set of related knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

Quantity surveying is a profession that blends engineering, construction and economics. To be competent is to have the ability to apply the set of related knowledge, skills and abilities to perform a task effectively. This paper examines the competency requirements for quantity surveyors (QSs) in the face of changing and increasing client needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a detailed meta-analysis of the literature, 12 basic/core and 16 evolving competencies are identified. Primary data were gathered through a field survey involving practicing QSs from client, consultant and contractor organisations, and university students undertaking QS programmes in Malaysia. The data obtained were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistical tools.

Findings

The significance of the basic/core and evolving competencies are presented. Overall, the most important contemporary skills are cost planning, valuation of works, measurement/quantification and contract documentation. The evolved roles require expertise in communication and negotiation, ethics and professional conduct and value management. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicates there are misaligned expectations of the proficiency levels needed to provide contemporary and future services between practitioners in client/consultant organisations, contractors and new generation students.

Originality/value

The findings provide guidance on the education, training and practice of quantity surveying to deal with emerging challenges in the dynamic built environments in Malaysia and beyond.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2019

Muhammad Farrukh, Jason Wai Chow Lee, Muhammad Sajid and Abdul Waheed

Culture plays a vital role in shaping individuals’ intentions and behaviour. Influence of cultural values on entrepreneurship has been acknowledged widely by academics and…

Abstract

Purpose

Culture plays a vital role in shaping individuals’ intentions and behaviour. Influence of cultural values on entrepreneurship has been acknowledged widely by academics and practitioners. However, little in terms of empirical results is known. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of cultural values on entrepreneurial intentions (EI) of Pakistani students.

Design/methodology/approach

Cultural values of individualism and collectivism were incorporated into the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Smart-PLS software was used to run a structural equation modelling (SEM) technique to analyse the data.

Findings

SEM results showed that attitudes towards entrepreneurship and perceived behavioural controls (PBC) mediated the relationship between individualism and EI while subjective norms (SN) mediated the relationship between collectivism and EI.

Originality/value

The study confirms the applicability of the TPB for understanding the EI in a collectivist culture. Additionally, findings of this study displayed that external factors, such as cultural values, can impact EI through SN, attitude and PBC. Incorporation of cultural values in TPB contributed to the understating of antecedents of EI.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-126-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Diane M. Phillips and Jason Keith Phillips

Introduces social network analysis techniques to business logistics and transportation. The case study has two specific goals. First, it introduces social network analysis…

Abstract

Introduces social network analysis techniques to business logistics and transportation. The case study has two specific goals. First, it introduces social network analysis techniques to the business logistics and transportation community as a useful tool with which to study the dynamic flows of communication between members of a social network. Second, it describes a wide variety of techniques and then utilizes them to examine artifacts of scholarly communication ‐ journal citations. In doing so, it tracks the changing communication patterns across two separate time periods to describe the evolution and maturation of the fields of business logistics and transportation. Concludes that over a period of ten years the flow of information between the journals in the area of business logistics and transportation has become more efficient and that journals directly communicate with one another. Also, there is no longer a distinct break between logistics and transportation.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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