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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Shonagh Leigh and Jason Davies

This paper aims to provide practitioners with a brief but comprehensive review of the current evidence base for psychological treatment approaches used in the UK that may…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide practitioners with a brief but comprehensive review of the current evidence base for psychological treatment approaches used in the UK that may be useful for stalking therapies.

Design/methodology/approach

A rapid evidence assessment was conducted on papers (post the UK Protection from Harassment Act, 1997) that discuss treatments of stalking (with or without a conviction) and associated offences/disorders. Therapies reviewed were Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Cognitive Analytic Therapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy and Schema Therapy. Searches for Mentalization-Based Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy in relation to stalking were also performed but yielded no results that met inclusion criteria.

Findings

There is currently a severely limited evidence base for the efficacy of the psychological treatment of stalking behaviours. Some interventions show promise although a multifaceted, formulation-based approach is likely to be required.

Practical implications

Future research would benefit from robust studies focused on stalking with long-term efficacy follow-ups.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first rapid evidence review of psychological treatments that directly address stalking behaviour.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2022

Laura Broome, Jason Davies and Mark Lewis

South Wales Police Mental Health (MH) Triage service was initiated to meet the Welsh Government MH priority of early intervention to prevent MH crisis. Community…

Abstract

Purpose

South Wales Police Mental Health (MH) Triage service was initiated to meet the Welsh Government MH priority of early intervention to prevent MH crisis. Community Psychiatric Nurses, based in the control-room, provide advice to police and control room staff on the management of MH-related incidents. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the first 12 months of operation (January-December 2019).

Design/methodology/approach

Service evaluation of the first 12 months of operation (January–December 2019). Data were analysed in relation to: MH incidents; repeat callers; Section (S)136 use/assessment outcomes. Police, health staff and triage service users were interviewed and surveyed to capture their opinions of the service.

Findings

Policing areas with high engagement in triage saw reductions in S136 use and estimated opportunity costs saving. Triage was considered a valuable service that promoted cross agency collaborations. De-escalation in cases of mental distress was considered a strength. Access to follow-on services was identified as a challenge.

Practical implications

Triage enables a multi-agency response in the management of MH-related incidents. Improving trust between services, with skilled health professionals supporting police decision-making in real time.

Originality/value

There is a gap in the research on the impact of police-related MH triage models beyond the use of S136. This project evaluated the quality of the service, its design and the relationship between health, police and partner agencies during the triage process. Multi-agency assessment of follow-up is needed to measure the long-term impact on services and users.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Aisling O’Meara, Meinir Edwards and Jason Davies

The purpose of this paper is to explore women’s experiences of criminal justice systems to inform the development of guidance on working with women.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore women’s experiences of criminal justice systems to inform the development of guidance on working with women.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-part, independent samples and qualitative study using semi-structured interviews incorporating both interpretive phenomenological analysis and thematic analysis was conducted. In Study 1, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six women on probation in the community and data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Interviews in Study 2 were conducted with seven women in custody with data analysed using inductive-deductive thematic analysis. The applicability and expansion of Study 1 themes was then explored.

Findings

Seven emergent themes indicated relational approaches to offender management may improve experiences of judicial systems for female offenders and for their probation officers. This approach may help prevent common systemic issues from perpetuating negative interactions between these groups. Specific suggestions for developing relational security and consistency of care within these relationships are provided.

Practical implications

Taking a relational approach to female offender management may help remedy some of the systemic difficulties faced by female offenders and their probation officers.

Originality/value

By focussing on the experiences of women screened in to the offender personality disorder pathway this study provides insight as to how this service can assist in the development of relational security between probation staff and their clients.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Laura Rachel Freeman, Michelle Waldman, Judith Storey, Marie Williams, Claire Griffiths, Kevin Hopkins, Elizabeth Beer, Lily Bidmead and Jason Davies

The purpose of this paper is to outline the work of a service provider, service user and carer group created to develop a strategy for service user and carer co-production.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the work of a service provider, service user and carer group created to develop a strategy for service user and carer co-production.

Design/methodology/approach

A reflective narrative account is given of the process through which the group formed and began to develop a working model aimed at shaping a cultural shift towards more co-produced services. The paper has been co-produced and includes the collaborative voices of service users, carers, multi-disciplinary staff, third-sector representatives, managers and colleagues from associated services.

Findings

The model developed outlines three stages for services to work through in order to achieve meaningful and sustainable co-produced services. The importance of developing associated policies related to such areas as recruitment, payment, support and training is also outlined. Challenges to co-production are noted along with suggested approaches to overcoming these.

Originality/value

The ethos of co-production is relatively new in the UK and so knowledge of the process and model may help guide others undertaking similar work.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Jason Davies, Sharon Oddie and Jonathan Powls

Internet‐mediated research is becoming an increasingly viable option for forensic researchers, allowing some of the limitations of traditional approaches to be overcome…

Abstract

Internet‐mediated research is becoming an increasingly viable option for forensic researchers, allowing some of the limitations of traditional approaches to be overcome. Many advantages are evident in this approach, such as the ability to access large, diverse samples and specialist groups. However, there are limitations and ethical issues that researchers need to be aware of. This paper provides an overview of internet‐mediated research for forensic researchers and practitioners, and highlights some of the ways in which this approach can be used to undertake research relevant to forensic practice. Some examples of research undertaken using this approach are provided.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2009

Jason Davies and Kate Oldfield

Individuals being treated in medium secure hospitals have typically engaged in some form of offending in other service settings or while in the community. Although…

Abstract

Individuals being treated in medium secure hospitals have typically engaged in some form of offending in other service settings or while in the community. Although psychological treatment for addressing such behaviour in medium secure hospitals is beginning to be developed, at present there is a lack of evidence of ‘what works’. This paper reports a review of the type and level of offending behaviour engaged in by those in a single medium secure service, including the conviction histories for such behaviours and the psychological approaches to risk reduction and offending behaviour taken in medium secure hospitals in England and Wales. The need to develop an evidence base for psychological treatment in medium secure services including at the individual level is clearly indicated.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2007

Jason Davies and Aisling O'Meara

Sadistic behaviour is not uncommon in offender populations, especially in some groups of violent and sexual offenders. However, little research has been conducted on…

Abstract

Sadistic behaviour is not uncommon in offender populations, especially in some groups of violent and sexual offenders. However, little research has been conducted on sadism in a non‐offender group who are not part of a sadomasochistic culture or club. Twelve undergraduates, six of whom considered themselves sadistic and six who did not, completed an open‐ended questionnaire exploring individuals' experiences and views of themselves and others. Questionnaire responses were analysed using a thematic analysis approach and substantial differences were found between the two groups. Further research should be conducted with general population groups to further our understanding of sadistic behaviour and attitudes.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2010

Claire Nagi and Jason Davies

The topic of offender rehabilitation has been subject to much research over the past decade. Numerous meta‐analytic reviews of offender treatment, particularly group…

Abstract

The topic of offender rehabilitation has been subject to much research over the past decade. Numerous meta‐analytic reviews of offender treatment, particularly group treatment based on cognitive behavioural principles, have been reported. Together with the ‘triad of principles’ — risk, need and responsivity — they have formed the foundation upon which most offending behaviour interventions have developed. However, outcome data from existing programmes provides mixed evidence, and evidence for interventions for those in forensic mental health settings are still in their infancy. This paper critically considers the current evidence for the treatment of offending behaviour, and its application in forensic mental health settings, in order to inform development of such treatments in low secure mental health care. Most of the research focuses on non‐mental health settings, and is largely what will be considered here. The paper concludes that low secure interventions need to capitalise on the evidence of ‘what works’ while revisiting key concepts such as ‘dose’ and responsivity in order to design appropriate treatments. Individual outcome evaluation needs to form part of development in this area.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Claire Nagi, Jason Davies and Laura Shine

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, content and structure of an intensive group-based intervention designed to address a range of needs common to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, content and structure of an intensive group-based intervention designed to address a range of needs common to individuals within low secure forensic mental health settings. Additionally, the feasibility, acceptability, resource implications and levels of participation and understanding are evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the development, content and structure of an intensive group-based intervention designed to address a range of needs common to individuals within low secure forensic mental health settings. Additionally, the feasibility, acceptability, resource implications and levels of participation and understanding are evaluated.

Findings

Analysis showed that the intervention was well received by staff and participants and that those with low self-report knowledge at the start showed large improvements. Recorded levels of participation and understanding were lower than expected.

Research limitations/implications

Group-based interventions in low secure settings can be developed from existing “what works” information. Such treatments can feasibly be delivered although participants may need support – something which is not reported in many intervention studies. Research is now needed to assess the impact of the General Treatment & Recovery Programme (GTRP) intervention on participants.

Originality/value

The development of treatment programmes for offending behaviour within low secure forensic mental health settings is still in its infancy. This paper outlines and describes the development of such an intervention, namely the GTRP.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2009

Jason Davies and Claire Hepworth

Ensuring the validity of individual responses to psychometric tests is important in a wide range of psychology practice and research. This study compares a number of…

175

Abstract

Ensuring the validity of individual responses to psychometric tests is important in a wide range of psychology practice and research. This study compares a number of methods for detecting test faking on a measure not designed with explicit validity checks. A total of 270 students took part in two related studies, one using a standard ‘pencil and paper’ test presentation and the other a computer‐based presentation. Techniques such as responses to specific test items and speed of responding may be useful for assessing the validity of responses. The implications are that such procedures may offer methods for identifying faked responding in a range of psychometric instruments where previously this has not been possible.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

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