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Book part
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Jason M. Bergner, Joshua J. Filzen and Jeffrey A. Wong

To disseminate helpful advice to current and future candidates about the accounting academic job market.

Abstract

Purpose

To disseminate helpful advice to current and future candidates about the accounting academic job market.

Methodology/approach

Literature review, interviews with recently hired faculty members, insights from the author’s experiences as both job candidates and search committee members, and discussions with colleagues.

Findings

In this chapter, we discuss the current state of the job market for accounting professors and offer our insights as well as those from a group of recent graduates. It is our recent experience that many rookie candidates pursue initial faculty positions with an incomplete understanding of many aspects of the market, including how the market clears, job expectations, and other issues that we believe are important. While others have adequately addressed the importance of research in the profession and alluded to some aspects of the market, we provide additional useful information about the market and other career aspects in order to assist new graduates in their quests to find fulfilling appointments. Our chapter complements existing literature to form an updated and more complete picture of the market and profession.

Practical implications

This chapter helps prepare candidates for the job market by providing information and advice that complements advice given in Ph.D. programs and the existing literature.

Social implications

Candidates entering the job market will better understand the nuances of the market and can make more informed decisions about the institutions that best meet their needs.

Originality/value

The chapter provides important practical advice for job seekers about the accounting academic job market not available elsewhere.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-767-7

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Jason Bergner, Yining Chen and Melloney Simerly

We survey full-time accounting faculty holding terminal degrees about professional certifications. In addition to asking faculty about professional certifications they…

Abstract

We survey full-time accounting faculty holding terminal degrees about professional certifications. In addition to asking faculty about professional certifications they hold, we gather data about faculty’s experiences as well as their perceptions about the pursuit of professional certifications. We find significant results for the following items: faculty at non-doctoral schools are more likely to hold professional certifications than their doctoral counterparts; newer faculty are less likely to hold a professional certification, indicating a decreasing trend of accounting faculty who are professionally certified, and faculty teaching audit and taxation are more likely to hold a professional certification, denoting a higher practice credential requirement for faculty teaching in those areas. Our work also reveals faculty’s perceptions about the benefits of obtaining a certification to both teaching and research. By understanding the motivations and obstacles perceived by accounting faculty in their pursuit of professional certifications, universities can design reward systems that best suit their institutional mission while accommodating faculty pursuit of professional certifications in order to bridge the gap between accounting education and accounting practice.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-236-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Jason Bergner and Marcus Brooks

We investigate how different methods of instructor-led reviews for an introductory accounting exam may affect student achievement. We compare two review groups: students…

Abstract

We investigate how different methods of instructor-led reviews for an introductory accounting exam may affect student achievement. We compare two review groups: students who review for the exam by playing Monopoly versus those engaged a more traditional review. We also include a third group (no formal review). We conducted an experiment by examining students’ test scores on an accounting cycle exam. The students were placed into three groups: those who played Monopoly to review for the exam, those who participated in a more traditional exam review, and those who did not participate in any formal review. Our results indicate that, as expected, reviewing for an exam significantly improves students’ exam scores when compared to peers that did not review. However, this result is driven by the students in the Monopoly condition. Students in the traditional review did not score statistically significantly higher than those in the control (no review) group. Also, we did not find that students playing Monopoly as a review scored significantly higher than students actively working in a more traditional review. This study contributes to the literature by informing professors about the efficacy of using Monopoly to review the accounting cycle. This is the first paper to directly test the effects of using Monopoly on student achievement.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-180-3

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Candace L. Witherspoon, Jason Bergner, Cam Cockrell and Dan N. Stone

Knowledge is the most important component of sustainable organizational growth and economic performance. This meta‐analysis aims to summarize the determinants of

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Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge is the most important component of sustainable organizational growth and economic performance. This meta‐analysis aims to summarize the determinants of individuals' knowledge sharing (KS) intentions and behaviors in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors organize the knowledge sharing antecedents investigated in 46 studies (n≈10,487, median n=172) into three categories, i.e. knowledge sharer intention and attitude (four variables); rewards for KS (three variables); and organizational culture (nine variables).

Findings

Variables in all three antecedent categories positively contribute to KS intentions and behaviors; high between‐study variability exists, and the fail‐safe n statistic suggests the observed effects are robust against a “file drawer” (missing study) bias. Moderator results suggest that motivating KS is easier in collectivist, as opposed to individualist, cultures.

Research limitations/implications

In most of the studies included in this meta‐analysis, participants volunteered to share knowledge with researchers. Hence, an important threat to validity in the existing research is a potential “cooperation bias” in which participants likely overestimate their willingness to share knowledge. Future KS research should investigate the dark underbelly of knowledge activities in organizations, including investigations of knowledge hoarding, withholding of knowledge to gain personal advantage, and “contributing” worthless information to gain (through gaming) personal payoffs.

Originality/value

The meta‐analysis results herein contribute to the KS literature by identifying the determinants of KS, and an important potential limitation of much existing KS research.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-236-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-767-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-180-3

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Case study
Publication date: 28 July 2016

John L. Ward

The ATF case is a succinct opportunity to explore the many special features of leadership succession for a family business. In 2009 the company was passing the baton to…

Abstract

The ATF case is a succinct opportunity to explore the many special features of leadership succession for a family business. In 2009 the company was passing the baton to the oldest of three sons in the second-generation family business.

ATF produced metal and plastic fasteners for, primarily, the automotive industry. ATF had grown into a company with more than $50 million in annual revenues. The company had grown in large part through alliances with other family businesses around the world. First-generation patriarch Don Surber had led the company since he acquired it in 1982. Don was known for his charismatic leadership style and his focus on driving value through a network approach.

The case traces the career paths of all three sons and looks at the succession through the eyes of the oldest son, Jason Surber. The elements, constituents, and challenges of succession are evident. The fundamental insight is that business leadership succession is far more than just passing the business leadership baton. It also requires attention to the family, the board, the whole system of external stakeholders, and the future of ownership.

The epilogue in this note covers the period from 2009 to 2012 by describing what Jason did to earn credibility, to incorporate his brothers, and to define his personal leadership philosophy and style. The epilogue thus provides students with an opportunity to consider and define their own personal philosophy of management leadership and their own style. They will see the art of melding styles from the past with their own for the future.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Avinandan Mukherjee

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7849

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Avinandan Mukherjee and Yam Limbu

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258

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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