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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Muhammad Shakil Ahmad, Ahmed Jamil, Khawaja Fawad Latif, T. Ramayah, Jasmine Yeap Ai Leen, Mumtaz Memon and Raza Ullah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of different food choice motives on attitude and, subsequently, the impact of attitude, subjective norm and perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of different food choice motives on attitude and, subsequently, the impact of attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control on the purchase intention of Pakistani ethnic food, based on the food choice motives theory and the theory of planned behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an intercept survey, data were collected from 559 local tourists coming from different areas of the country, who visited Swat, Gilgit and Muree regions of Pakistan, and the data were analysed using SmartPLS software.

Findings

In terms of direct effects, mood, familiarity, natural content and price were found to be significant predictors for attitude, whereas attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control were found to positively affect intention to purchase Pakistani ethnic food. In addition, attitude was found to serve as a mediator for the relationships between mood, familiarity, sensory appeal and price on purchase intention.

Originality/value

This study has shed some light on the food choice behaviour of domestic tourists opting for their own local cuisine in Pakistan, which is under-represented in the tourism and food research literature. We also tested an integrated model of food choice motives and the theory of planned behaviour in modelling purchase intention in the tourism perspective. The present study also adds to the existing literature on mediation by modelling attitude as a mediator between food choice motives and purchase intention in the context of a developing country.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Jasmine Yeap Ai Leen, Ramayah Thurasamy and Azizah Omar

This article aims to provide some key points that e‐retailers should be mindful of when attempting to reach out to Millennial web users in a fast‐evolving web environment.

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Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to provide some key points that e‐retailers should be mindful of when attempting to reach out to Millennial web users in a fast‐evolving web environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The key points were derived from a combination of methods that include review of relevant literature (both past and current), empirical evidence drawn from previous studies and the authors' observation of developments within the web retailing environment.

Findings

Six key points were listed, covering pertinent issues like first impressions, customer trust and stickiness, magnitude of social networks, delivering rich user experiences, customer relationship retention strategies and the importance of usability and aesthetics.

Practical implications

It is pertinent that e‐retailers keep themselves informed of the latest technological progress within the web environment should they aspire to survive and achieve success in online retailing among Millennials. They should adapt to the needs of the Millennial generation instead of the Millennials adjusting themselves to the e‐retailers.

Originality/value

E‐retailers can gain a better understanding on the characteristics of Millennial web users and on engaging the Millennials' attention and commitment towards online retailing web sites.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Jasmine Yeap Ai Leen and T. Ramayah

The purpose of this study is to validate the Retail Service Quality Scale (RSQS) developed by Dabholkar et al. in the Malaysian business setting, specifically in the

1976

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to validate the Retail Service Quality Scale (RSQS) developed by Dabholkar et al. in the Malaysian business setting, specifically in the context of apparel specialty stores.

Design/methodology/approach

Two well‐known retail clothing store chains were selected for this study. Purposive sampling method was used, with a total of 211 responses collected from customers of all X and Y's chain stores in the northern region of Malaysia.

Findings

The paper finds that all the five dimensions: physical aspects, reliability, personal interaction, problem solving, and policy, are highly suited for measuring retail service quality in clothing stores, also proving that the instrument is applicable in the Malaysian setting. Retail service quality is furthermore associated with future consumption behaviour in terms of the customers' intention to visit, purchase and recommend the stores to others.

Research limitations/implications

The instrument is proven to be valid, reliable and appropriate for studying retail businesses that offer a mix of services and merchandise. The instrument is also applicable in another culture other than the USA, namely Malaysia.

Practical implications

Retailers can utilize the instrument for benchmarking current levels of retail service quality, carrying out periodic inspections to measure service performance and improvement, as well as to detect problematic areas of service quality within the stores that are in need of attention.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the somewhat limited studies carried out on instrument validation in Malaysia. Furthermore, the RSQS is tested in Malaysia – a country with a vibrant, dynamic retail environment and heightened consumer awareness for fashion and retail.

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