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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Patrick Griffis and Jared Hoppenfeld

The authors' goal in writing this article was to provide background information and detailed considerations to assist those wishing to provide patent and trademark…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors' goal in writing this article was to provide background information and detailed considerations to assist those wishing to provide patent and trademark assistance at their libraries. The major considerations include staffing, spaces and resources, with the time commitment from the staff being the most significant.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combined the experiences of an author relatively new to patent and trademark librarianship with one who has years of experience. These were used in tandem with knowledge gained from a decade of attendance at annual week-long seminars at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) as well as by way of a comprehensive literature review.

Findings

The main commitment needed in providing patent and trademark services to the public is not money but the investment of time, which includes professional development, staffing, teaching classes and workshops, outreach and consultations.

Originality/value

The information in this paper should serve as guidance to anyone new to providing patent and trademark services within their libraries, including those at Patent and Trademark Resource Centers (PTRCs), Patent Information Centres (PATLIBs) and beyond. Although articles have been published on various aspects of intellectual property (IP) and libraries, a comprehensive guide to providing patent and trademark services has yet to be published.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Jared Hoppenfeld and Elizabeth Malafi

– The purpose of this paper is to explore how academic and public libraries support entrepreneurial researchers and, in doing so, demonstrate impact and share best practices.

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1767

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how academic and public libraries support entrepreneurial researchers and, in doing so, demonstrate impact and share best practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors discuss their own experiences as academic and public business librarians who support entrepreneurs. They do so by revealing the main services they provide to this unique user group and presenting examples from their own institutions. They also present what is done at other libraries by way of a literature review and an informal survey.

Findings

After navigating the landscape of business librarian support of entrepreneurs, many commonalities were found among the types of support offered. Most libraries in this study collaborate with a business incubator, center for entrepreneurship, office of economic development or small business development center in some fashion. Numerous outreach and networking efforts were found that had positive effects on the local and national economies. Although public and academic libraries have different base user groups, both types of libraries serve current and potential entrepreneurs, as well as students, who are looking for similar data in the same kinds of resources.

Originality/value

Although specific examples can be found in the literature, little has been published that provides an overview of the entrepreneurial services and resources provided at numerous libraries of different types as well as resulting impact. This paper fills this gap and should provide new ideas to librarians of all kinds wishing to reach entrepreneurs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Jared Hoppenfeld

This research was performed with the aim of determining the potential benefit(s) of including web‐based polling in the library instruction classroom.

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1310

Abstract

Purpose

This research was performed with the aim of determining the potential benefit(s) of including web‐based polling in the library instruction classroom.

Design/methodology/approach

Over the course of a year, web‐based polling was used in library instruction sessions and the survey results were recorded. Feedback forms were also used to gauge a sense of the students' experiences with this form of active learning.

Findings

This study found that web‐based polling in a library instruction classroom benefits both students and instructors. The students enjoy these sessions and are more attentive than in a typical lecture, which leads to better learning. Instructors are able to learn about the students' uses of technology, research methods, and more with the polling capability.

Research limitations/implications

The research in this study was only done using the free version of Poll Everywhere in management classes. It would be interesting to see if the results would be the same in other business classes as well as non‐business classes. It could also be beneficial to test the functionality of paid accounts as well as seeing how other web sites compare.

Practical implications

This article may assist those deciding between different audience response systems and provide tips to those wishing to implement web‐based polling, and more specifically Poll Everywhere, in their sessions.

Originality/value

Few articles on audience response systems exist solely on web‐based polling and the benefits instructors can reap in addition to their students. This research will be of benefit to any librarian who teaches in the classroom, especially those in academic libraries.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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