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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Eric Pettersson Ruiz and Jannis Angelis

This study aims to explore how to deanonymize cryptocurrency money launderers with the help of machine learning (ML). Money is laundered through cryptocurrencies by…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how to deanonymize cryptocurrency money launderers with the help of machine learning (ML). Money is laundered through cryptocurrencies by distributing funds to multiple accounts and then reexchanging the crypto back. This process of exchanging currencies is done through cryptocurrency exchanges. Current preventive efforts are outdated, and ML may provide novel ways to identify illicit currency movements. Hence, this study investigates ML applicability for combatting money laundering activities using cryptocurrency.

Design/methodology/approach

Four supervised-learning algorithms were compared using the Bitcoin Elliptic Dataset. The method covered a quantitative analysis of the algorithmic performance, capturing differences in three key evaluation metrics of F1-scores, precision and recall. Two complementary qualitative interviews were performed at cryptocurrency exchanges to identify fit and applicability of the algorithms.

Findings

The study results show that the current implemented ML tools for preventing money laundering at cryptocurrency exchanges are all too slow and need to be optimized for the task. The results also show that while not one single algorithm is most suitable for detecting transactions related to money-laundering, the specific applicability of the decision tree algorithm is most suitable for adoption by cryptocurrency exchanges.

Originality/value

Given the growth of cryptocurrency use, this study explores the newly developed field of algorithmic tools to combat illicit currency movement, in particular in the growing arena of cryptocurrencies. The study results provide new insights into the applicability of ML as a tool to combat money laundering using cryptocurrency exchanges.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Jannis Angelis and Henrik Jordahl

The study aims to compare management practices in private and publicly owned elderly care homes. The demands for cost-effective care combined with emphasis on client…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to compare management practices in private and publicly owned elderly care homes. The demands for cost-effective care combined with emphasis on client experience highlights the importance of appropriate management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilises a survey of 500 homes covering management practices on monitoring, performance management and staff development. These are highly correlated, allowing for treating the practices both in aggregate and individually in the analysis. Additional questions capture information on site and management conditions.

Findings

Management practices employed at the elderly care homes vary greatly, with high and low individual scores found in most homes. But private homes consistently score higher than public homes, especially when it comes to incentive practices. Also, elderly care homes of both ownership forms score at the top and bottom of each management practice. But looking at the average management score, there are fewer private homes that score really low and more private homes that score really high.

Practical implications

The results identify given characteristics and maturity of the various management practices employed to plan and control operations in the elderly care homes and provides managerial and staff insights into their use.

Originality/value

The application and impact of standard management practices has previously been limited in publicly funded services. Little is known about management practices in elderly care and whether the practices are associated with better performance.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Jannis Angelis and Bruno Fernandes

Innovation is a key source of competitiveness in the knowledge economy, and continuous improvement (CI) is a key element of such corporate pursuit. The purpose of this…

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1817

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation is a key source of competitiveness in the knowledge economy, and continuous improvement (CI) is a key element of such corporate pursuit. The purpose of this paper is to explore links to prevalent shop floor conditions which support or prohibit the effective realisation of CI. Lean is a globally competitive standard for product assembly of discreet parts. Successful Lean application is conditioned by an evolutionary problem‐solving ability of the rank and file. This is in itself contingent on employee involvement in improvement programs and the implementation of appropriate practices. But the challenge of operating innovative Lean systems lacks statistically valid guidance.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study is based on 294 worker responses from 12 manufacturing sites in four industry sectors.

Findings

The study identifies particular practices that impact employee participation in improvement activities and their performance outcomes. Process suggestions are driven by a combination of difficult working conditions that the workers seek to improve and team‐based work. However, for suggestions on product improvements, significant practices are worker favorable industrial relations and human resource practices.

Research limitations/implications

To test work practices, work practice variables were measured with single items, trading lower measurement reliability for increased scope. Also, there is a moderate sample size, if addressed by selecting sites with a variety of practices.

Practical implications

The results indicate that the main business benefit is in enhanced product quality through process, rather than product, improvements, suggesting that management should pursue worker involvement on continuous process improvements, and employ designated design teams for product improvements.

Originality/value

The paper empirically identifies the relationship between particular work practices and product and process improvement in a Lean setting.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Jannis Angelis, Robert Conti, Cary Cooper and Colin Gill

The characteristics of successful lean operations make a committed workforce a necessity. However, there is an ongoing debate over whether lean characteristics inherently…

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6814

Abstract

Purpose

The characteristics of successful lean operations make a committed workforce a necessity. However, there is an ongoing debate over whether lean characteristics inherently enhance or impede commitment. The purpose of this paper is to help settle the debate, as well as provide insights into the role specific work practices play.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on responses from 1,391 workers at 21 lean sites, the authors examined the relationship between the degree of lean implementation and worker commitment; as well as the commitment effects of 21 lean work practices.

Findings

The paper examines relationships between worker commitment and lean production, sheds light on the lean commitment debate and provides guidance for designing lean systems that complement high‐commitment work practices.

Practical implications

The results will be of value to readers with interests in operations, human resources and high‐performance work practices, as well as the management and implementation of lean and its associated practices.

Originality/value

The study described in the paper is unique in that it establishes a statistically valid relationship between lean production and worker commitment and associated work practices.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Jelena Širaliova and Jannis J. Angelis

The question of whether a business should pursue a marketing strategy that is standardised across national markets or adapted to individual markets has long troubled…

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5268

Abstract

Purpose

The question of whether a business should pursue a marketing strategy that is standardised across national markets or adapted to individual markets has long troubled practicing managers and academics. The purpose of this study is to examine such marketing mix standardisation in the Baltic states.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross‐sectional study employs a survey of management responses from multinational companies active in the Baltic states to capture their marketing strategies. Another survey is used to capture customer perceptions of the degree of marketing mix standardisation.

Findings

This research supports the idea of marketing standardisation across the Baltic countries, but it also points at particular areas for adaptation.

Research limitations/implications

The three Baltic countries present an interesting case due to close geographical location, shared history and economic development, alongside differences in consumer behaviour caused by independent national development. This makes for unique market conditions when it comes to marketing standardization in the region.

Practical implications

The research results support multinational firms in their pursuit of the right balance between adaptation and standardisation in their marketing mix.

Originality/value

This study contributes to research in the areas of international marketing strategy and marketing standardisation.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Edson Pinheiro de Lima, Sergio E. Gouvea da Costa and Jannis J. Angelis

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical discussion about the roles that a performance measurement system should perform. The enterprises' operations systems

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3945

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical discussion about the roles that a performance measurement system should perform. The enterprises' operations systems and environments, characterized by their complexity and dynamics, are challenging the strategic operations management models.

Design/methodology/approach

The developed theoretical construction is based on a literature review. The measurement system is studied in the context of a strategic operations management system.

Findings

The structures, processes and spaces were the lens used to study the performance measurement system and contributed to organize the concepts in tables, that is, roles statements were created based on these guidelines. These tables synthesized and identified the main roles that the system should perform, stating their definitions and related perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

The generated framework is theoretical in essence and needs to be tested, although the theoretical exercise showed a common sense around the articulated main concepts.

Practical implications

The understanding of the performance measurement system roles contributes to improve design, implementation and use of the performance system.

Originality/value

The paper's main contribution is the theoretical underpinning used to develop the performance framework. The system design approach used will enable further research into strategic performance measurement application for the design and use of such a system. Continuous improvement, organizational learning and the management of change process will be required properties for the strategic management of the operations function.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Robert Conti, Jannis Angelis, Cary Cooper, Brian Faragher and Colin Gill

This empirical paper seeks to address the neglected work condition aspect of lean production (LP) implementation, specifically the relationship between LP and worker job stress.

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18139

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical paper seeks to address the neglected work condition aspect of lean production (LP) implementation, specifically the relationship between LP and worker job stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The Karasek job stress model was used to link shopfloor practices to expected worker stress. The model incorporates the effects of job demands (physical and psychological), job control and social support. The study employs management and worker questionnaires, management interviews and structured plant tours. The response variable is total worker job stress – the sum of the physical and mental stress levels. The independent variable for the first question is the degree of lean implementation at the sites.

Findings

The results are based on 1,391 worker responses at 21 sites in the four UK industry sectors. About 11 tested practices are significantly related to stress and an unexpected non‐linear response of stress to lean implementation is identified. Results indicate that LP is not inherently stressful, with stress levels significantly related to management decisions in designing and operating LP systems.

Practical implications

The hypotheses tests shed light on the relationships between LP practices and job stress, and reveal a significant managerial influence on stress levels. The regression model shows the scale and significant lean practices of this influence, with the work practices explaining 30 percent of job stress variations. The stress reduction and stress control opportunities identified in the study show the potential for designing and operating effective lean systems while also controlling stress levels.

Originality/value

This is the first known multi‐industry empirical study of the relationship of job stress to a range of lean practices and to the degree of lean implementation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

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298

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 27 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

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372

Abstract

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Alistair Brandon‐Jones, Niall Piercy and Nigel Slack

The aim of this review and of the papers in this special issue is to critically examine different approaches to teaching operations management (OM) in order to provoke and…

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2686

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this review and of the papers in this special issue is to critically examine different approaches to teaching operations management (OM) in order to provoke and stimulate educators within the discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

The papers within this special issue include empirical assessments of a problem‐based learning enterprise resource planning (ERP) simulation; a computer‐based learning tool for material requirements planning (MRP); a simulation of assembly operations; an operations strategy innovation game; an extension of the production dice game; an experiential teaching method in different class settings; and problem‐based assessment methods in OM. A variety of data are used to support these empirical studies, including survey, interview, and observational data.

Findings

The papers within the special issue support the argument that OM is well‐suited to more applied methods of teaching focusing on the application of subject knowledge to real‐life situations through a variety of techniques.

Practical implications

It is hoped that this review and the papers within this special issue act to stimulate educators to re‐evaluate their approaches to teaching OM and encourage them to consider adopting experiential teaching methods, business simulations, role‐plays, group exercises, live cases, and virtual learning environments, instead of, or in addition to, the more conventional lectures that typically dominate many OM modules around the world.

Originality/value

A special issue on teaching OM appears timely given the significant changes to both the university landscape and to the nature of the discipline that we have witnessed over the last quarter of a century.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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