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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Janneka L. Guise

To develop a method of systematically analyzing reference and instruction programmes at academic libraries so managers of such services can identify potential areas of…

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a method of systematically analyzing reference and instruction programmes at academic libraries so managers of such services can identify potential areas of change and make more confident recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the library literature and then introduces a template for programme analysis. A case study is used to help illustrate the need for programme analysis, and also to clarify the template.

Findings

The reference and instruction literature on assessment and new service models indicates that academic librarians are struggling to update programming in order to meet the needs of current library patrons. There is no how‐to manual for managers of reference and instruction departments to analyze their services comprehensively and to decide what changes to make. This paper introduces a template that academic librarians could use to systematically analyze their reference and instruction programming with regard to the history of the programmes, internal and external environmental factors that affect the provision of service, and how the current service model compares with others.

Practical implications

The use of this template will allow academic librarians at any size library to investigate the historical and environmental factors that affect their services, so they can more confidently identify potential areas of change and make documented and supported recommendations to library administration.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a gap in the literature and offers a guide to programme analysis for managers of reference and instruction departments.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Janneka L. Guise, Janet Goosney, Shannon Gordon and Heather Pretty

The paper aims to describe a framework for a summer research/writing workshop for new university students, and its evolution over time and across institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe a framework for a summer research/writing workshop for new university students, and its evolution over time and across institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The University of Toronto at Scarborough (UTSC) has successfully offered its award‐winning two‐day Summer Learning Institute on Research, Writing and Presentation Skills for four years (2004‐2007), to increasing enrolments. Memorial University of Newfoundland (Memorial) adapted the UTSC model and successfully piloted its four‐day workshop, Summer Program in Academic Research and Communication (SPARC), in August 2006. Both programs were low‐cost, non‐credit summer workshops for new students to help them prepare for university‐level research and writing. Memorial offered its program a second time in August 2007. This paper focuses on the Memorial experience.

Findings

The success of these programs is attributed to a common framework used in each case: program planning, marketing, and delivery and assessment.

Practical implications

The framework described in this paper could be adapted by other institutions wishing to implement such a program. In addition, the SPARC team will continually improve the program by reflecting on each part of the framework.

Originality/value

Much research has been done to identify and address the specific needs of first‐year university students. For example, some institutions offer “first year experience” courses for credit, while others place first‐year students into Interest Groups. Most academic libraries offer information literacy sessions to groups of undergraduate students during the regular semester. This paper presents a model for reaching first year students before they take their first class at university.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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