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Article

Janne Harkonen, Arto Tolonen and Harri Haapasalo

The previous literature has indicated that the productisation of services may play a role in service management, although a certain level of obscurity still surrounds the…

Abstract

Purpose

The previous literature has indicated that the productisation of services may play a role in service management, although a certain level of obscurity still surrounds the concept. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to clarify the meaning of service productisation (SP) as well as to contribute to a greater understanding of the concept.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive analysis was applied to 13 instances of activities related to the productisation of services, with secondary data being analysed to identify practices relevant to SP and to examine their significance. The analysis is guided by an extensive literature review.

Findings

SP has been found to play a role in systematising and tangibilising a service offering and its related processes as well as in formalising the processes and service offerings. The potential elements of SP have been identified and supporting evidence has been provided. The findings indicate that SP has a specific focus on the offering and its related processes, with the aim being to create a service product that can be sold, delivered and invoiced. SP may utilise various practices and techniques, and customer orientation also plays a significant role. A typology of SP has been created by reflecting on its commercial and technical aspects.

Practical implications

This study has important implications for the service industry as it provides a structure and key considerations for productising services.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to seek evidence for the concept of SP from multiple instances of SP as well as an extensive literature base. The typology created provides a context for discussing SP as well as reflecting on its commercial and technical aspects.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article

Hannu Hannila, Joni Koskinen, Janne Harkonen and Harri Haapasalo

The purpose of this paper is to analyse current challenges and to articulate the preconditions for data-driven, fact-based product portfolio management (PPM) based on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse current challenges and to articulate the preconditions for data-driven, fact-based product portfolio management (PPM) based on commercial and technical product structures, critical business processes, corporate business IT and company data assets. Here, data assets were classified from a PPM perspective in terms of (product/customer/supplier) master data, transaction data and Internet of Things data. The study also addresses the supporting role of corporate-level data governance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study combines a literature review and qualitative analysis of empirical data collected from eight international companies of varying size.

Findings

Companies’ current inability to analyse products effectively based on existing data is surprising. The present findings identify a number of preconditions for data-driven, fact-based PPM, including mutual understanding of company products (to establish a consistent commercial and technical product structure), product classification as strategic, supportive or non-strategic (to link commercial and technical product structures with product strategy) and a holistic, corporate-level data model for adjusting the company’s business IT (to support product portfolio visualisation).

Practical implications

The findings provide a logical and empirical basis for fact-based, product-level analysis of product profitability and analysis of the product portfolio over the product life cycle, supporting a data-driven approach to the optimisation of commercial and technical product structure, business IT systems and company product strategy. As a virtual representation of reality, the company data model facilitates product visualisation. The findings are of great practical value, as they demonstrate the significance of corporate-level data assets, data governance and business-critical data for managing a company’s products and portfolio.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing literature by specifying the preconditions for data-driven, fact-based PPM as a basis for product-level analysis and decision making, emphasising the role of company data assets and clarifying the links between business processes, information systems and data assets for PPM.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article

Erno Mustonen, Janne Harkonen and Harri Haapasalo

This study aims to improve understanding of companies’ motives and concerns in relation to cooperation through a joint commercial product portfolio.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to improve understanding of companies’ motives and concerns in relation to cooperation through a joint commercial product portfolio.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research method was used to study 17 companies based on two case projects.

Findings

The joint commercial product portfolio is introduced as a new type of co-marketing. The possible business drivers, targeted benefits and perceived challenges of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in relation to cooperation through a joint commercial product portfolio are identified. The companies seem to be motivated by and concerned about similar issues that also apply to other forms of co-marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The study consisted of two case projects in the same country and, thus, share fairly similar business environments and cultures. Therefore, the same results may not be obtained for a study that is conducted in a different location.

Practical implications

Managers of SMEs can benefit from the results of this study by improving their understanding of co-marketing opportunities through the creation of a joint commercial product portfolio with suitable companies. In addition, the results provide managers with insights into the challenges that should be considered when planning marketing cooperation.

Originality/value

The study provides new perspectives on the existing co-marketing literature by discussing the creation of a joint commercial product portfolio as a vehicle to support companies’ business objectives. The study contributes to the increasing business-to-business co-marketing literature by presenting the business drivers, targeted benefits and perceived challenges related to SMEs cooperation through a joint commercial product portfolio.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Arian Razmi-Farooji, Hanna Kropsu-Vehkaperä, Janne Härkönen and Harri Haapasalo

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to understand data management challenges in e-maintenance systems from a holistically viewpoint through summarizing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to understand data management challenges in e-maintenance systems from a holistically viewpoint through summarizing the earlier scattered research in the field, and second, to present a conceptual approach for addressing these challenges in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is realized as a combination of a literature review and by the means of analyzing the practices on an industry leader in manufacturing and maintenance services.

Findings

This research provides a general understanding over data management challenges in e-maintenance and summarizes their associated proposed solutions. In addition, this paper lists and exemplifies different types and sources of data which can be collected in e-maintenance, across different organizational levels. Analyzing the data management practices of an e-maintenance industry leader provides a conceptual approach to address identified challenges in practice.

Research limitations/implications

Since this paper is based on studying the practices of a single company, it might be limited to generalize the results. Future research topics can focus on each of mentioned data management challenges and also validate the applicability of presented model in other companies and industries.

Practical implications

Understanding the e-maintenance-related challenges helps maintenance managers and other involved stakeholders in e-maintenance systems to better solve the challenges.

Originality/value

The so-far literature on e-maintenance has been studied with narrow focus to data and data management in e-maintenance appears as one of the less studied topics in the literature. This research paper contributes to e-maintenance by highlighting the deficiencies of the discussion surrounding the perspectives of data management in e-maintenance by studying all common data management challenges and listing different types of data which need to be acquired in e-maintenance systems.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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Article

Matti Mottonen, Janne Harkonen, Pekka Belt, Harri Haapasalo and Jouni Simila

The purpose of this paper is to provide a tangible example of organisational solutions in effective design for manufacturing (DfM) in a large information and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a tangible example of organisational solutions in effective design for manufacturing (DfM) in a large information and communications technology (ICT) company.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview study was carried out in a leading ICT company to clarify the practical realisation of DfM, and the current challenges encountered. The interviews covered all the key persons involved in DfM and related processes, in a case company that has successfully applied DfM for over a decade.

Findings

The paper shows the importance of a separate management organisation for coordinating the requirements of internal functions. With relation to the case company, this organisation, in contrast to the literature, is located in production, not in product development. Despite the successful application of DfM, the case company still has challenges in exploitation of related data systems.

Research limitations/implications

This paper describes one of the top companies in its field. However, the obtained results could vary to some degree, should a wider set of companies be included in the study.

Practical implications

Managers of other companies could learn from this example at three levels: organisational solutions for DfM, its practical realisation, and the challenges encountered.

Originality/value

The existing literature is relatively scarce on organisational implications of DfM implementation. This paper identifies a functional organisational location, structure and practical realisation for effective DfM.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Hanna Kropsu‐Vehkapera, Harri Haapasalo, Janne Harkonen and Risto Silvola

The purpose of this paper is to provide tangible examples of product data management (PDM) practices in large high‐tech companies, and to highlight current challenges.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide tangible examples of product data management (PDM) practices in large high‐tech companies, and to highlight current challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a qualitative interview study. First, a PDM system frame was defined to aid analyses. Second, an interview study was carried out in four companies to clarify the practical realisation of PDM, and the current challenges. The interviewees are experts in the field of PDM, currently holding significant related posts in their companies.

Findings

Overall, PDM activities are similar in all companies, however, there is some diversity in the realisation of these practices. PDM related challenges identified in this study are various, strongly influenced by company background and current organisational state.

Research limitations/implications

This paper includes interviews in four companies with different backgrounds, and a workshop, providing a good view on topical issues in the field of PDM. The obtained results could vary to some degree, should the sample size be larger, or especially should the products of the studied companies be less complex.

Practical implications

This paper provides managers and PDM system developers' with a better understanding over the issues that are affecting PDM solution development and on major system requirements, together with relevant insight on current challenges.

Originality/value

The existing literature is relatively scarce in describing the practicalities of PDM. The obtained results highlight the significance of company background influencing the selection of PDM solutions.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Matti Mottonen, Pekka Belt, Janne Harkonen and Binshan Lin

Requirements management has become a challenge for new product development (NPD) as products are getting increasingly complicated and customer segments more fragmented…

Abstract

Purpose

Requirements management has become a challenge for new product development (NPD) as products are getting increasingly complicated and customer segments more fragmented. The purpose of this paper is to provide new ideas for improving requirements management in the information and communications technology (ICT) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative interview study is carried out in the ICT sector to clarify the current challenges in requirements management. The results of the interview study are analysed using a benchmark from the automotive industry. This benchmark is chosen, as the automotive industry is a developed business sector that has streamlined its business processes, including its requirements management.

Findings

The paper shows how ICT can benefit from the experience of the car industry on issues such as managing customer needs throughout the NPD process, overflow of data and communicating requirements with suppliers.

Research limitations/implications

Using another sector as a benchmark is not a straightforward process and results cannot be directly copied. Fresh ideas are, however, obtainable when a well‐developed benchmark is used and results are applied flexibly. Deeper analysis on individual areas indentified here might be interesting topics for further study.

Practical implications

The paper shows that managers in the ICT sector should pay more attention to their requirements management and serving the needs of internal customers. The requirements management of the Japanese automotive industry is a potential source for improvement initiatives.

Originality/value

The paper provides new perspectives for the requirements management of the ICT sector by benchmarking the Japanese automotive industry.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Jenni Savonen, Pekka Hakkarainen, Kati Kataja, Inari Sakki and Christoffer Tigerstedt

The purpose of this paper is to study the social representations of polydrug use in the Finnish mainstream media. Social representations are shared ways of talking about…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the social representations of polydrug use in the Finnish mainstream media. Social representations are shared ways of talking about socially relevant issues and have ramifications on both individual and socio-political levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The social representations theory and the “What’s the problem represented to be?” analysis provided the theoretical framework. In total, 405 newspaper articles were used as data and analysed by content analysis and thematic analysis. The key tenets of the social representations theory, anchoring, objectifying and naturalisation, were used in data analysis.

Findings

The study found that polydrug use was written about differently in articles over the study period from 1990 to 2016. Three social representations were introduced: first, polydrug use as a concept was used to refer to the co-use of alcohol and medical drugs. This was seen as a problem for young people, which could easily lead to illicit drug use. Second, illicit drugs were included in the definitions of polydrug use, which made the social representation more serious than before. The typical polydrug user was portrayed as a person who was addicted to substances, could not quite control his/her use and was a threat to others in society. Third, the concepts were naturalised as parts of common language and even used as prototypes and metaphors.

Originality/value

The study provides a look at how the phenomenon of polydrug use is conceptualised in everyday language as previous research has concentrated on its scientific definitions. It also adds to the research of media representations of different substances.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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