Search results

1 – 10 of 176
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Janice Thomas, Stella George and Pamela Buckle Henning

The purpose of this paper is to consider how multiple logic systems employed by project managers lead to manifold understandings of two foundational project management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how multiple logic systems employed by project managers lead to manifold understandings of two foundational project management constructs (“project” and “planning”) that in turn influence both the practice of project management and project outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Largely conceptual in nature, this paper focuses on the language project managers use to make sense of projects and plans, seeking to get beyond the surface recitation of discourse to the underlying logic systems that influence practice. The discussion is illustrated with stories of practice, collected through interpretive phenomenological interviews with project managers perceived by their peers to demonstrate special skill or knowledge in successfully delivering projects, and reference to project management doctrine embedded in professional standards.

Findings

Expert project managers use multiple thinking styles to adapt their practice to emergent project issues. While instrumental rationality helps project managers focus on how to do things, other rationalities, particularly those labeled non‐rational, help them to decide what to do and why to do it. Expert judgment and practice supported by intuitive, holistic, and relational thinking allows project managers to navigate a sophisticated journey from ambiguity to accomplishment.

Research limitations/implications

This paper illustrates how practice research can deconstruct interpretive phenomenological interviews to get beyond identifying the “what”, or empirical evidence, of practice to explore unique individual habitus that inform each individual's practice. Understanding the actions of expert project managers navigating between prescribed project management doctrine and their own praxis opens a space for us to rethink how we research, teach, and talk about project management.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into the value and implications of practice‐based research by illustrating: how research grounded in practice identifies and raises more complex questions than professional doctrine currently reflects; and how simplifications utilizing duality as a means of theorizing (i.e. “hard” versus “soft”, rational versus non‐rational, etc.) is neither useful nor reflected in expert practice.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Damian Hodgson and Svetlana Cicmil

The purpose of this paper is to review the formation and evolution of the “Making Projects Critical” movement in project management research.

Downloads
996

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the formation and evolution of the “Making Projects Critical” movement in project management research.

Design/methodology/approach

Retrospective and discursive paper.

Findings

Reflections on tensions and challenges faced by the MPC movement.

Originality/value

The paper establishes the historical trajectory of this movement and clarifies the tensions and challenges faced by MPC.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Derek H.T. Walker, Svetlana Cicmil, Janice Thomas, Frank Anbari and Christophe Bredillet

The purpose of this paper is to provide of a review of the theory and models underlying project management (PM) research degrees that encourage reflective learning.

Downloads
1586

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide of a review of the theory and models underlying project management (PM) research degrees that encourage reflective learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of the literature and reflection on the practice of being actively involved in conducting and supervising academic research and disseminating academic output. The paper argues the case for the potential usefulness of reflective academic research to PM practitioners. It also highlights theoretical drivers of and barriers to reflective academic research by PM practitioners.

Findings

A reflective learning approach to research can drive practical results though it requires a great deal of commitment and support by both academic and industry partners.

Practical implications

This paper suggests how PM practitioners can engage in academic research that has practical outcomes and how to be more effective at disseminating these research outcomes.

Originality/value

Advanced academic degrees, in particular those completed by PM practitioners, can validate a valuable source of innovative ideas and approaches that should be more quickly absorbed into the PM profession's sources of knowledge. The value of this paper is to critically review and facilitate a reduced adaptation time for implementation of useful reflective academic research to industry.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Derek H.T. Walker, Frank T. Anbari, Christophe Bredillet, Jonas Söderlund, Svetlana Cicmil and Janice Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to present a cost‐benefit interpretation of academic‐practitioner research by describing and analysing several recent relevant examples of…

Downloads
1537

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a cost‐benefit interpretation of academic‐practitioner research by describing and analysing several recent relevant examples of academic‐practitioner research with a focus on doctoral theses carried out at universities and business schools in clusters of research centred in North America, Australia and Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

Using case study examples, a value proposition framework for undertaking collaborative research for higher degree level study is developed and presented.

Findings

Value proposition benefits from this level of collaborative research can be summarised as enhancing competencies at the individual and organisational level as well as providing participating universities with high‐quality candidates/students and opportunities for industry engagement. The project management (PM) professional bodies can also extend PM knowledge but they need to be prepared to provide active support.

Practical implications

A model for better defining the value proposition of collaborative research from a range of stakeholder perspectives is offered that can be adapted for researchers and industry research sponsors.

Originality/value

Few papers offer a value proposition framework for explaining collaborative research benefits. This paper addresses that need.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 January 2019

Abstract

Details

Stem-Professional Women’s Exclusion in the Canadian Space Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-570-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-868-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Markus Hällgren and Marcus Lindahl

The purpose of this editorial is to reflect on the growing interest of situated project research.

Downloads
319

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to reflect on the growing interest of situated project research.

Design/methodology/approach

The editorial is conceptual and relies on published work and the articles included in the special issue.

Findings

With this special issue it is found that practice‐based studies, also called Projects‐as‐Practice studies, interested in the everyday activities of project practitioners, are multi‐faceted and rich. What may also be seen is that practice‐based studies are not yet a coherent area. However, it is more important that practice‐based studies allow researchers to understand the organization less as an entity and more as a socially‐accomplished task.

Research limitations/implications

Several implications for research are offered, including the need for studies that emphasize the small details of organizing, and that practice‐based studies are not restricted to a certain methodology but depend on what a particular paper tries to accomplish.

Practical implications

With an ever‐growing stream of research focusing on projects the guest editors argue that it is about time to look into the details of organizing. This could be accomplished through a number of ways but in this special issue it is proposed that approaching traditional areas with a conscious naivety when asking the questions may do it. For the practitioner, the special issue offers important insights into how things are done in practice, which may be used as a mirror or reflection upon their own practice.

Originality/value

This editorial and special issue offer insights for any academic interested in understanding projects differently.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Yvonne Schoper and Helgi Thor Ingason

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Peter Kennison and Malcolm Read

In the second of two articles, the potential of the internet for child victimisation by paedophiles and the challenges for controls that the technology poses are…

Downloads
204

Abstract

In the second of two articles, the potential of the internet for child victimisation by paedophiles and the challenges for controls that the technology poses are discussed. The links between the availability of imagery and the actual practice of paedophilia are considered and the problems of legal definition and control policies are outlined. The article concludes by outlining some controls presently available and makes suggestions for improved policing.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Abstract

Details

Values, Rationality, and Power: Developing Organizational Wisdom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-942-2

1 – 10 of 176