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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2012

Mary Isabelle Young, Lucy Joe, Jennifer Lamoureux, Laura Marshall, Sister Dorothy Moore, Jerri-Lynn Orr, Brenda Mary Parisian, Khea Paul, Florence Paynter and Janice Huber

As shown in their earlier stories, while at differing times and places Janice and Mary searched for a research methodology that felt congruent with who they were each…

Abstract

As shown in their earlier stories, while at differing times and places Janice and Mary searched for a research methodology that felt congruent with who they were each becoming and the inquiries they imagined, they both became drawn toward the relational aspects of narrative inquiry. As Clandinin and Connelly wrote: “Relationship is key to what it is that narrative inquirers do” (2000, p. 189). Key in negotiating relationships as narrative inquirers is our collective sharing of stories of experience. This relational storytelling shapes both shared vulnerability among storytellers as each person awakens to the complexity of lives being composed and recomposed and, too, a growing sense of working from, and with, stories as a way to shape personal, social, and institutional change (Clandinin & Connelly, 1998, 2000; Connelly & Clandinin, 2006). Clandinin and Connelly (1998) describe this kind of narrative change as taking shape in the following ways:For us, the promise of storytelling emerges when we move beyond regarding a story as a fixed entity and engage in conversations with our stories. The mere telling of a story leaves it as a fixed entity. It is in the inquiry, in our conversations with each other, with texts, with situations, and with other stories that we can come to retelling our stories and to reliving them. (p. 251)Furthermore, Maenette Benham (2007) writes thatthe power of narrative is that, because it deeply explores the tensions of power by illuminating its collisions (e.g., differences of knowledge and practices), it reveals interesting questions that mobilize processes and resources that benefit native people and their communities. Indeed, the political impact of narrative cannot be dismissed. (pp. 513–514)

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Warrior Women: Remaking Postsecondary Places through Relational Narrative Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-235-6

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2012

Janice Huber grew up in Crooked Creek, Alberta in the midst of a family and place that greatly shapes her life. Janice is the mother of one beautiful daughter. As a…

Abstract

Janice Huber grew up in Crooked Creek, Alberta in the midst of a family and place that greatly shapes her life. Janice is the mother of one beautiful daughter. As a classroom teacher Janice taught in rural, international, and urban school contexts. Growing from her doctoral and post doctoral study in the late 1990s Janice's collaborative narrative inquiries continue to attend to the lives of children, families, teachers, Elders, and teacher education students in relation with their experiences in home, community, school, and post-secondary places. Janice currently teaches in the Faculty of Education at the University of Regina. She is a coauthor of numerous articles and book chapters, including the two books, Composing Diverse Identities: Narrative Inquiries into the Interwoven Lives of Children and Teachers (2006) and Places of Curriculum Making: Narrative Inquiries into Children's Lives in Motion (2011).

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Warrior Women: Remaking Postsecondary Places through Relational Narrative Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-235-6

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2012

Mary Isabelle Young, Lucy Joe, Jennifer Lamoureux, Laura Marshall, Sister Dorothy Moore, Jerri-Lynn Orr, Brenda Mary Parisian, Khea Paul, Florence Paynter and Janice Huber

In a paper shared at the 2004 Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE), Marie Battiste urged Canadian academics and policy makers to become part of a…

Abstract

In a paper shared at the 2004 Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE), Marie Battiste urged Canadian academics and policy makers to become part of a transformative process of reconstructing Canada's colonial education system which she describes as shaping “Indigenous peoples’ trauma and disconnection with many aspects of education and themselves” (p. 2). Battiste calls for the repositioning of Indigenous knowledges in post-secondary institutions, a process through which institutional structures and practices, curriculum foundations, and traditions are substantially changed and, in particular, that these are changed in ways that value and engage the capacities of Aboriginal students. Battiste's argument is significant for both Aboriginal post-secondary students and for their communities.

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Warrior Women: Remaking Postsecondary Places through Relational Narrative Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-235-6

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Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Janice Huber, M. Shaun Murphy and D. Jean Clandinin

Our awakening to the curriculum being made by children and families in home and community places grows out of a theoretical background that informs our current inquiry…

Abstract

Our awakening to the curriculum being made by children and families in home and community places grows out of a theoretical background that informs our current inquiry into the tensions experienced by children, families, and teachers as they compose diverse lives on school landscapes, contexts increasingly structured by achievement testing. Our understanding of curriculum is grounded in Clandinin and Connelly's (Clandinin, 1986; Connelly & Clandinin, 1988) earlier attention to curriculum making as the expression of a teacher's personal practical knowledge. They described this knowledge as “that body of convictions and meanings, conscious or unconscious, that have arisen from experience (intimate, social, and traditional) and that are expressed in a person's practices” (Clandinin & Connelly, 1995, p. 7). Dewey's (1938) notions of continuity, situation, and experience, shaped Clandinin and Connelly's (1992) understanding of the “teacher not so much as a maker of curriculum but as a part of it and to imagine a place for contexts, culture (Dewey's notion of interaction), and temporality (both past and future contained in Dewey's notion of continuity)” (p. 365). By bringing together their understandings of teachers’ knowledge as personal practical knowledge with Dewey's notion of experience and Schwab's (1969) four curriculum commonplaces – teacher, learner, subject matter, and milieu – Clandinin and Connelly (1992) suggested that curriculumbe viewed as an account of teachers’ and children's lives together in schools and classrooms … .[In this view of curriculum making] the teacher is seen as an integral part of the curricular process … in which teacher, learners, subject matter, and milieu are in dynamic interaction. (p. 392)

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Places of Curriculum Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-828-2

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Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Janice Huber is an associate professor in pre-service and graduate teacher education at the University of Regina. She is a former elementary teacher and teacher researcher…

Abstract

Janice Huber is an associate professor in pre-service and graduate teacher education at the University of Regina. She is a former elementary teacher and teacher researcher who, with Karen Keats Whelan, coauthored a relational, paper-formatted doctoral dissertation. Growing from doctoral and post-doctoral study, Janice's collaborative narrative inquiries and publications, including the award-winning book, Composing Diverse Identities: Narrative Inquiries into the Interwoven Lives of Children and Teachers, continue to explore narrative understandings of identity in relation with Aboriginal teachers and Elders in Canada and in relation with the curriculum-, identity-, and assessment-making experiences of children, families, and teachers. She is the 2006 recipient of the Narrative Research SIG (AERA) Early Career Award.

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Places of Curriculum Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-828-2

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Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Janice Huber, M. Shaun Murphy and D. Jean Clandinin

As we opened this chapter in relation with Loyla's life, we did so with a transcript excerpt from a research conversation in which Loyla spoke about a series of…

Abstract

As we opened this chapter in relation with Loyla's life, we did so with a transcript excerpt from a research conversation in which Loyla spoke about a series of experiences shaping much unhappiness in her life; they were experiences also creating significant concern for Orie. On the day in May when Loyla, Orie, and Janice engaged in the conversation from which the transcript excerpt is taken, Orie and Loyla had, just hours prior, participated in an after-school meeting with Mrs. Gallagher. Orie explained to Janice that she had requested the meeting as a result of a series of situations unfolding over a number of months between Loyla, Cicily, and Ahlam. Recounting the events to Janice, Orie began with Loyla's shift in inviting Ahlam to her birthday party. Initially, Loyla suggested Ahlam as a friend she wanted to invite but then, the next morning, she told Orie she no longer wanted to invite Ahlam because Cicily had said that if Ahlam was invited, she would not attend (Journal entry, Orie, December 8, 2008).

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Places of Curriculum Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-828-2

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2012

Mary Isabelle Young, Lucy Joe, Jennifer Lamoureux, Laura Marshall, Sister Dorothy Moore, Jerri-Lynn Orr, Brenda Mary Parisian, Khea Paul, Florence Paynter and Janice Huber

Jennifer: There have been many meaningful experiences that have occurred throughout our time together. Being a part of this work has not only allowed me to develop a…

Abstract

Jennifer: There have been many meaningful experiences that have occurred throughout our time together. Being a part of this work has not only allowed me to develop a better understanding about myself and the path that I choose to take from this day on, but it has resulted in new friendships with women whose stories have become part of my own.

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Warrior Women: Remaking Postsecondary Places through Relational Narrative Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-235-6

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2012

M. Shaun Murphy, Vicki Ross and Janice Huber

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore and make visible narrative thinking as an interpretive act in moving from field texts to research texts.Approach – The…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore and make visible narrative thinking as an interpretive act in moving from field texts to research texts.

Approach – The chapter shows a collaborative meaning-making process of three teacher educators/researchers as they inquire into their identities as teacher educators. The chapter is framed around a focus on temporality, one commonplace within the three-dimensional narrative inquiry space and also shows connections with the two other commonplaces of sociality and place.

Findings – The researchers deepen the understanding of identity as situated in a continuity of experience in relation with others. They highlight how stories beget a storied response. They demonstrate that the experiential dimensions of sociality, temporality, and spatiality are interconnected. They find, through thinking narratively, that the relational is critical – both historically and in the present. Relationships shape a sense of self. This relational aspect of their research introduces ethical considerations. It is in honoring the stories they carry and the stories that are given to or shared with them that the possibility exists for shaping a responsive and attentive life.

Research implications – Numerous authors have written about the relational aspects of narrative inquiry as a research methodology. This chapter shows ways in which the relational aspects of narrative inquiry shaped both our inquiry into and our understandings of our identities as teacher educators. These foundational aspects of the relational both in terms of narrative inquiry as a research methodology and in identity inquiry open up many future research possibilities which extend far beyond narrative inquiry into teacher educator identity.

Value – Researchers utilizing a narrative inquiry approach will find a helpful explanation and demonstration of the process of making meaning of field texts by situating them within the three-dimensional narrative inquiry space.

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Narrative Inquirers in the Midst of Meaning-making: Interpretive Acts of Teacher Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-925-7

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2015

Sean Lessard, Lee Schaefer, Janice Huber, M. Shaun Murphy and D. Jean Clandinin

Through autobiographical narrative inquiry into the experiences of five teacher educators, we illustrate an alternative way of educating teacher educators. We show how…

Abstract

Through autobiographical narrative inquiry into the experiences of five teacher educators, we illustrate an alternative way of educating teacher educators. We show how learning to be, and become, a teacher educator occurs within a particular knowledge landscape at the Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) at the University of Alberta. Drawing on a conceptualization of both personal and professional knowledge landscapes (Clandinin, Schaefer, & Downey, 2014), we highlight 13 features of the CRTED knowledge landscape that were particularly salient in the shaping of two of the authors’ practices as beginning teacher educators. The CRTED knowledge landscape differs from dominant university professional knowledge landscapes and is a kind of counterstory (Lindemann Nelson, 1995) that shapes the knowledge of teacher educators in distinct ways, that is, ways that call them to attend to lives, to stay open to diverse ways of knowing and being, and to the importance of response. Through learning to be and become a teacher educator within the CRTED knowledge landscape, we show how, within this landscape, teacher educators learn to shape different knowledge landscapes with teacher education students, through enabling them to learn to attend to personal knowledge landscapes, within teacher education and future classroom spaces, knowledge landscapes in which living, telling, retelling, and reliving stories of experience with one another is education.

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International Teacher Education: Promising Pedagogies (Part C)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-674-4

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Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Janice Huber, M. Shaun Murphy and D. Jean Clandinin

The children returned and Ms. Lee had them go to their desks. There was so much excitement in the air … . Ms. Lee has rearranged the desks again and I like how there are…

Abstract

The children returned and Ms. Lee had them go to their desks. There was so much excitement in the air … . Ms. Lee has rearranged the desks again and I like how there are such frequent shifts in seating. Ms. Lee spoke of their photographs and their collages. She then said I would give the guiding question for their work on the citizenship education project today in their small sustained response groups. I fumbled badly and said something about who they are and how they belong. Ms. Lee wrote it on the board. As Ms. Lee continued to speak, I went and changed the words to “Who I am and how I belong.” Ms. Lee spoke to the children of how they were going to start putting their photos on their poster boards and to think about how their photographs were representations of who they were and where they belonged. No glue or scissors at this point. She also showed them the paper where she wanted them to write about their photographs.The children got their individual pieces of bristol board for their collages and Ms. Lee said they might want to choose a spot on the floor as they did this work. They were intent and focused on their own photographs but were also sharing with their neighbours. At one point, I commented to Ms. Lee, Simmee, and Jennifer about how impressed I was with their intentness. I spent some time with Logan who had some magnificent photographs … he has an eye for the aesthetic. I pointed out to him how much I liked the photographs. I also spent some time with Taylor who had three photographs of clothes: one Chinese outfit, one Korean outfit, and a long white dress that she said she did not know what it was. I asked if it was a christening dress and she said she thought so, that her mom had taken the photograph. She also had a close up of a Canadian flag. I spent some time with Sophie who had rejected some of her photographs as not interesting. When I pointed out what I saw as interesting things in her photographs, she started to see them more positively. I asked a few children what they planned to put in the centre of their collages. I realized, even as I asked that question, that I was privileging the centre photograph. Liam had his dad's photo clearly in the centre. He was busily writing words. He said he wasn't sure what to write about his dad but then wrote something about family being important. (Field notes, April 2, 2007)

Details

Places of Curriculum Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-828-2

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