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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Cameron Morrill and Janet Morrill

Questions exist regarding the extent to which internal auditors should participate in the external audit, and wide variations are observed in practice. Many professional…

Abstract

Questions exist regarding the extent to which internal auditors should participate in the external audit, and wide variations are observed in practice. Many professional bodies increasingly advocate the view that increased coordination between the internal and external auditors, including increased use of the internal auditor for the external audit, provides more efficient and effective audit coverage. However, others maintain that internal auditors should not focus on areas that are the subject of external audit interest. This article attempts to shed light on this debate by using insights from transaction cost economics (TCE) to identify conditions under which organizations encourage internal audit participation in the external audit. An analysis of survey data collected from directors of Canadian internal audit departments indicate that some (TCE) variables, particularly transaction‐specific investment, are significantly associated with internal audit participation in the external audit.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 18 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2016

Sylvie Berthelot and Janet Morrill

We document the relationship between size, the presence of a full-time accountant, strategy, and the adoption of management control systems (MCSs) in small- and…

Abstract

Purpose

We document the relationship between size, the presence of a full-time accountant, strategy, and the adoption of management control systems (MCSs) in small- and medium-sized Canadian manufacturing enterprises (SMEs).

Methodology/approach

Using survey results from 247 Canadian SMEs, we use partial least squares to holistically test our model and also present data for each MCS.

Findings

We find that the presence of a professional accountant is strongly associated with the adoption of MCSs and is a significant explanatory variable more often than either size or strategy.

Research limitations/implications

While the impact of organization and strategy has been extensively studied within large organizations, we investigate these relationships within SMEs. Additionally, we investigate the impact of having a full-time accountant, a constraint unique to SMEs due to their limited resources.

Limitations include the fact that we likely have a significant survivor bias as the average age of our sample firms was 30 years. Our analysis of nonresponse bias does not allow us to conclude that such a bias did not exist. Also, it is possible that some respondents believed they had a certain MCS when others might think they did not.

Practical implications

This study will be of interest to owners/managers of manufacturing SMEs, their advisors, and economic development agencies. Our study also has implications for accounting education as most students will work for SMEs.

Originality/value

Few studies have documented the MCSs adopted by North American SMEs, and none have considered the impact of the presence of a full-time accountant.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Philip Thiagan Sinnadurai

– This paper aims to use Malaysian data to investigate determinants of the implied growth rate of abnormal earnings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use Malaysian data to investigate determinants of the implied growth rate of abnormal earnings.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprises 340 listed companies. Logistic regressions were conducted. The dependent variables, observed in 2009, distinguish companies with high versus low implied growth rates. The independent variables were observed in 2008. The independent variables of interest capture companies’ status as being Nanyang and politically connected corporations.

Findings

The results suggest that in Malaysia, implied growth rates are higher for Nanyang corporations and companies with a political connection related to economic policy.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by its one-year investigation period and blurred boundaries between types of political connections. Because these considerations bias the study against supporting the hypotheses, the significant results have enhanced credibility. The empirical proxies for implied growth rates are affected by measurement error. Hence, multiple proxies were used.

Practical implications

The results suggest that Malaysian Nanyang corporations are a sound investment. The evidence also indicates that in Malaysia, government investment in listed companies enhances, rather than erodes, shareholder wealth.

Originality/value

Owing to the prevalence of Nanyang companies and government investment in the private sector, the Malaysian setting is unique. The use of a broad definition of “political connections” is a unique aspect of this paper. Examination of implied equity growth rates and the proxies for the same are also original features.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2016

Abstract

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-972-5

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Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2017

Ashley Colby and Emily Huddart Kennedy

Research has established a connection between industrially-produced food and negative health outcomes. Scholars have also shown a significant link between poor food…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has established a connection between industrially-produced food and negative health outcomes. Scholars have also shown a significant link between poor food environments and health. This paper explores the experiences of university extension program agents in order to initiate greater dialogue about the role of extension in lessening the deleterious health impacts of unequal access to high quality and sufficient quantity foods. Specifically, we consider the role of food self-provisioning instruction (e.g., food gardening, preservation).

Methodology/approach

The paper draws on semi-structured interviews with 20 university extension program officers in the state of Washington.

Findings

Although our participants report that demand for education in food production skills is on the rise across Washington, there are barriers to the equitable distribution of self-provisioning skills.

Practical implications

There is considerable promise for extension programs to have positive implications for health and nutrition for communities struggling to access quality foods. To meet this progress, extension must be more aware of serving the entire public either through hiring agents mirror their constituencies or funding a more diverse array of programming.

Originality/value

Little existing research examines or evaluates using university extension programs as a vehicle for teaching food self-production, though these topics have been taught since the founding of extension.

Details

Food Systems and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-092-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Matthew M. Mars, Janet Bercovitz and Barclay E. James

Colleges and universities play a vital role in the creation and dissemination of the innovations that feed the knowledge economy. First, universities carryout a…

Abstract

Colleges and universities play a vital role in the creation and dissemination of the innovations that feed the knowledge economy. First, universities carryout a significant portion of the basic research that is conducted in the United States. In 2006, the National Science Foundation reported having awarded $30 B in research-based funding to colleges and universities (National Science Foundation, 2007). While this figure is not an indicator of innovation output, the number helps to demonstrate the scope of research activity that is occurring within the academy. Mansfield (1995) noted that government funding for university research is bent toward science that holds commercial potential and highlighted that such research is likely to produce a high amount of social benefits. Mansfield also concluded that measuring the social returns of university-born (and federally funded) innovations though difficult, is important. Second, universities are instrumental in the production of economically relevant human capital, including students trained in key science and technology disciplines (Leslie & Brinkman, 1988). Audretsch (2007) indicates a highly educated workforce that is capable of creating and moving innovative technologies into the marketplace is a critical component of the current entrepreneurial economy. Also, faculty who intersect industry through consulting and other commercial-related activities make valuable contributions to the economic growth and prosperity of communities, regions, and beyond. In short, colleges and universities are key contributors to the production and function of the innovations that largely drive the knowledge economy.

Details

Measuring the Social Value of Innovation: A Link in the University Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship Equation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-467-2

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