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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Janet Martin

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Janet Martin

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Janet Durgin and Joseph S. Sherif

This paper aims to advance research that accurately portrays the alarming rate at which spam is infiltrating and eroding the security of the internet.

981

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance research that accurately portrays the alarming rate at which spam is infiltrating and eroding the security of the internet.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the political, legal and ethical controversy surrounding the spam dilemma as well as the high costs of spam to telecommunications bandwidth, QoS and e‐commerce effectiveness.

Findings

Spam problem is a technological epidemic that multiplies exponentially each day. A dynamic digital jam is in prospect.

Practical implications

Presents viable options for a quick resolve, and unveils the changing strategies that integrity‐driven marketers are facing in lieu of the raging battle.

Originality/value

Tackles one of the most pressing issues in the business world today.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Ethan P Pullman

There’s little information available on Qatari students’ experience with information literacy. What little information does exists draws from outdated surveys and assumptions…

Abstract

Purpose

There’s little information available on Qatari students’ experience with information literacy. What little information does exists draws from outdated surveys and assumptions about the current population. The purpose of this paper is to describe how data collected from first-semester Qatari students who enrolled in a semester-long information literacy course at Carnegie Mellon University helped update perceptions of this population, drove changes made to content and instructional delivery, and enabled a reflective process for teaching and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre- and post-surveys completed by students explore Qatari students’ pre-college experience with information literacy concepts, using libraries, and writing. They also compare the students’ attitude toward information literacy before and after taking the course. Qatari students’ data were extracted from the overall student population to focus on this population and analyzed descriptively based on cumulative responses. The pre-survey data were used to inform changes made to instructional content and delivery throughout the term.

Findings

Contrary to assumptions, first-year Qatari students expressed familiarity with information literacy concepts before attending college. The data indicated strong learning preferences and a positive attitude toward information literacy.

Research limitations/implications

Since information collected in this study relied on student perceptions of their experience, results must be paired with performance measurement before drawing additional conclusions about information literacy competencies of first-year Qatari students. Further, the study did not explore gender and sociocultural differences; therefore no general conclusions should be drawn.

Practical implications

Instructional design should be based on a current understanding of local information needs and searching habits. In addition, this approach encourages reflective learning and teaching and help instructors avoid prior assumptions about their students.

Originality/value

This paper provides information on how Qatari students perceive their experience with information literacy before college, the importance of understanding information literacy concepts and its role in their personal, academic, and professional lives. It centers on a population for whom information literacy concepts remain both relatively challenging and critical for their future learning development and offers suggestions for future research.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2019

David M. Palfreyman

164

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

David Palfreyman

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

David Palfreyman

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2012

David M. Palfreyman

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

James Castiglione

Within the context of general systems theory (GST), this paper aims to review the literature on the potential for internet abuse and addiction among undergraduate university…

3418

Abstract

Purpose

Within the context of general systems theory (GST), this paper aims to review the literature on the potential for internet abuse and addiction among undergraduate university students in the university and library environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a review and synthesis of the relevant literature derived from the computer, education, medical and psychological sciences.

Findings

Anecdotal evidence has been accumulating for over a decade, suggesting that inappropriate use of the internet by college students may lead to adverse educational outcomes; however, very little empirical evidence is available to substantiate the phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

A lack of empirical evidence limits the conclusions one may draw on the nature and extent of the internet‐related difficulties that students may be experiencing. However, the accumulating anecdotal evidence and commentary suggests that near‐term and long‐term problems for both the individual and society are indeed possible. Therefore, a robust, international research program, designed to generate the empirical evidence required to clarify this issue, is absolutely essential.

Originality/value

A timely review of the internet abuse/addiction phenomenon is presented with the objective of increasing awareness, debate and additional empirical research.

Details

Library Review, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Alexandra L. Ferrentino, Meghan L. Maliga, Richard A. Bernardi and Susan M. Bosco

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications in…

Abstract

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications in business-ethics and accounting’s top-40 journals this study considers research in eight accounting-ethics and public-interest journals, as well as, 34 business-ethics journals. We analyzed the contents of our 42 journals for the 25-year period between 1991 through 2015. This research documents the continued growth (Bernardi & Bean, 2007) of accounting-ethics research in both accounting-ethics and business-ethics journals. We provide data on the top-10 ethics authors in each doctoral year group, the top-50 ethics authors over the most recent 10, 20, and 25 years, and a distribution among ethics scholars for these periods. For the 25-year timeframe, our data indicate that only 665 (274) of the 5,125 accounting PhDs/DBAs (13.0% and 5.4% respectively) in Canada and the United States had authored or co-authored one (more than one) ethics article.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-973-2

Keywords

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