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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Cecilia Hegarty and Janet Johnston

This paper aims to explore graduate training through SME‐based project work. The views and behaviours of graduates are examined along with the perceptions of the SMEs and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore graduate training through SME‐based project work. The views and behaviours of graduates are examined along with the perceptions of the SMEs and academic partner institutions charged with training graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are largely qualitative and derived from the experiences of graduates, company supervisors and University of Ulster staff involved in projects during 2001‐2007 when 140 FUSION projects were undertaken across the island of Ireland.

Findings

More job opportunities, changing job values and work ethic impact upon the uptake and success of FUSION projects. Employers, especially within growing SMEs, have adopted a learner‐centred approach in order to maximise the benefits of the project for both the graduate and the company. Graduate development programmes continue to strengthen university‐to‐business links, which in turn ensures graduate output meets the needs of industry.

Research limitations/implications

Data collected throughout the term of FUSION projects are reported; further analyses of stakeholder views post‐project completion would provide further insight into the longer‐term effects of graduate training upon career progression.

Practical implications

This analysis proffers graduate reflections on “work‐based learning”. It serves key reminders for evaluating satisfaction with graduate development programmes presenting two key implications, pathways for better preparing graduates/SMEs and routes for enhancing the benefits of such projects.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on research that seeks to enhance graduate training and placement experiences within SMEs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Hugh T. Miller and Arthur Sementelli

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Hugh T. Miller and Alka Sapat

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2017

Ashley Colby and Emily Huddart Kennedy

Research has established a connection between industrially-produced food and negative health outcomes. Scholars have also shown a significant link between poor food…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has established a connection between industrially-produced food and negative health outcomes. Scholars have also shown a significant link between poor food environments and health. This paper explores the experiences of university extension program agents in order to initiate greater dialogue about the role of extension in lessening the deleterious health impacts of unequal access to high quality and sufficient quantity foods. Specifically, we consider the role of food self-provisioning instruction (e.g., food gardening, preservation).

Methodology/approach

The paper draws on semi-structured interviews with 20 university extension program officers in the state of Washington.

Findings

Although our participants report that demand for education in food production skills is on the rise across Washington, there are barriers to the equitable distribution of self-provisioning skills.

Practical implications

There is considerable promise for extension programs to have positive implications for health and nutrition for communities struggling to access quality foods. To meet this progress, extension must be more aware of serving the entire public either through hiring agents mirror their constituencies or funding a more diverse array of programming.

Originality/value

Little existing research examines or evaluates using university extension programs as a vehicle for teaching food self-production, though these topics have been taught since the founding of extension.

Details

Food Systems and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-092-3

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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2018

Xin Janet Ge

This paper aims to investigate the factors that contribute to the changes of house prices including ethnic factors. Australia is a multicultural country with diversified…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the factors that contribute to the changes of house prices including ethnic factors. Australia is a multicultural country with diversified ethnicities. The median price of established houses (unstratified) in Sydney has reached a new record high of $910,000 in December 2015, increasing around 58.2 per cent from March 2011 [Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 2015a]. However, the prices of some suburbs have increased more than prices of others.

Design/methodology/approach

Six suburbs that represent ethnic majority originally including White, India and China will be selected as pilot studies. Hedonic regression analysis will be applied for the analysis based on 2001, 2006 and 2011 census data.

Findings

It is found that the main drivers of house prices are the dwelling physical characteristics and accessibility to convenient transportation. The level of household income also plays an important role. However, the impact of changes of ethnic on changes of prices is not significant.

Research limitations/implications

The study adds to the growing literature on the ethnicity changes on dwelling prices and is important for understanding whether some of the clusters of ethnic concentration or segregation effects property markets. This study is significant in its understanding of the main characteristics of ethnic changes of suburbs in Sydney.

Practical implications

An implication is that policy makers can attract different ethnic groups and encourage multicultural communities when they formulate housing and planning policies.

Originality/value

The relationship between ethnicity and house price appreciation is not extensively studied in Australia. This research contributes to the literature on the effects of ethnic changes on house prices and implications of policy formulation to encourage multicultural communities.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Janet S. Gaffney and Rebecca Jesson

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to understand how children expand independence within instructional interactions with their teachers. To do so, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to understand how children expand independence within instructional interactions with their teachers. To do so, the authors re-examine how scaffolding is understood and applied.

Approach – First, the authors consult websites and literature used by teachers and academics to examine how the notion of scaffolding is employed and explained. The authors analyze the roles, the intentions, the means, and the timing of scaffolding as used in popular literature to explain and support instruction. The authors then entertain a conceptual shift: What would the scaffolding process look like if learning were conceived as agentive? With this in mind, the authors interrogate descriptions of the tenets and functions of scaffolding to consider the process in relief.

Findings – The authors track the consequences of the inversion of scaffolding onto the understandings of the gradual release of responsibility (GRR) model. Scaffolding is understood as sitting within a GRR model, wherein the learner gradually releases responsibility to a teacher at the point of need. Intersubjectivity remains a basis for the model. A Window for Examining Teaching–Learning Interactions is offered as a frame with which to analyze the theories of both the child and the teacher apparent within scaffolding interactions. An accurate teacher’s theory of the child’s current and changing theories is required for teaching to be honed to invite children to efficiently access personal and contextual resources and to seek assistance when needed within engaging tasks with scope.

Practical Implications – When children are positioned as initiators of their learning, they are able to use their vast repertoire of knowledge of the world, language/s and literacies, and familial, cultural, and community ways of knowing to create, interpret, and engage in tasks. In this agentive view, children are positioned as holding full responsibility at the onset of any task and gradually releasing their responsibility to access support, when needed. Within tasks that are sufficiently wide for engagement at varied entry points, learners are the catalyst of the functions that were formerly initiated by teachers. Teachers invite children to access personal and contextual resources and to seek assistance, as needed, through additional external, contextual resources. This inverted model of scaffolding, that is child-directed rather than teacher-initiated, requires teachers to go beyond theories of teaching and learning and develop a theory of an individual child.

Details

The Gradual Release of Responsibility in Literacy Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-447-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Janet Chang, Alastair M. Morrison, Sean Hsin-Hung Lin and Ching-Yen Ho

Travellers who love to try different foods and who frequently follow up on food-related news and topics consider themselves to be “foodies”. The main aim of this research…

Abstract

Purpose

Travellers who love to try different foods and who frequently follow up on food-related news and topics consider themselves to be “foodies”. The main aim of this research was to identify the relationships among food consumption motivations, experiential values and well-being of foodies.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was distributed to foodies from the Chinese mainland, Hong Kong and Macao in March–May 2019 who were aged 18 and above and who had visited Taiwan within the prior two years. Some 480 valid responses were received based on intercepts at airports and the data, based on a conceptual model, were analysed through structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

Three paths among the key variables showed significant and positive relationships. Additionally, the mediating effect of food experiential values on emotions and well-being was identified.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide insights for food and hospitality scholars and the related literature since “foodie” is a rather new concept that is lacking in sufficient empirical and conceptual research. The research examines the relationships among experiential values, motivations and emotions and their influences on the well-being of foodies. In past studies on food consumption motivations and emotions, food experiential values were not included as a variable of potential influence. The research subjects were confined to foodies from the Chinese mainland (including Hong Kong and Macao) who were in Taiwan. Hence, the generalisation based on the sample may be limited.

Practical implications

This research produces useful information on the behaviour of Chinese foodies when they are travelling. Preparers of food and beverages and tourism retailers should supply food that represents local cultural characteristics and design relevant local food souvenirs with the appropriate packaging.

Social implications

Communities need to realise that not all visitors are alike and that some have a deeper interest in local foods and their historical and cultural roots.

Originality/value

Although numerous studies on the behaviours of Chinese tourists have been conducted, the research on their food consumption characteristics is limited. To date, no empirical studies have examined the relationships among foodies, food consumption motivations, food experiential values, emotions and well-being of mainland Chinese tourists, which is a knowledge gap in understanding this important market segment.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Janet Foley Orosz

Citizen participation in budgeting is often achieved by compliance with legal statutes on public hearing requirements. These pragmatic and legalistically-based approaches…

Abstract

Citizen participation in budgeting is often achieved by compliance with legal statutes on public hearing requirements. These pragmatic and legalistically-based approaches to citizen participation are examined, and the potential for creating participation that realizes more than meeting legal requirements is discussed. The author suggests that recommendations from recent work on citizen participation and governance can be used as standards for evaluating and improving citizen participation in budgeting, and applies these suggestions to a case example in city government finance.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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