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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Janet Godsell, Donato Masi, Antonios Karatzas and Timothy Mark Brady

The purpose of this paper is to explore the applicability and utility of supply chain (SC) segmentation through demand profiling to improve the effectiveness and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the applicability and utility of supply chain (SC) segmentation through demand profiling to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of infrastructure projects by identifying different types of project demand profiles.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-stage abductive research design was adopted. Stage 1 explored the applicability of SC segmentation, through demand profiling, to the portfolio of infrastructure projects in a utility company. Stage 2 was an iterative process of “theory matching”, to the portfolio, programme and project management literature. In stage 3, theoretical saturation was reached and “theory suggestions” were made through four propositions.

Findings

Four propositions outline how SC segmentation through project demand profiling could improve the effectiveness and efficiency of infrastructure projects. P1: the ability to recognise the different demand profiles of individual projects, and groups thereof, is a portfolio management necessity. P2: projects that contribute to the strategic upgrade of a capital asset should be considered a potential programme of inter-related repeatable projects whose delivery would benefit from economies of repetition. P3: the greater the ability to identify different demand profiles of individual/groups of projects, the greater the delivery efficiency. P4: economies of repetition developed through efficient delivery of programmes of repeatable projects can foster greater efficiency in the delivery of innovative projects through economies of recombination.

Originality/value

This work fills a gap in the portfolio management literature, suggesting that the initial screening, selection and prioritisation of project proposals should be expanded to recognise not only the project type, but also each project’s demand profile.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Paul Coughlan, Domien Draaijer, Janet Godsell and Harry Boer

Based on the combined experiences of operations and supply chain management (O&SCM) scholars and a reflective practitioner, the paper compares, contrasts and reconciles…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the combined experiences of operations and supply chain management (O&SCM) scholars and a reflective practitioner, the paper compares, contrasts and reconciles the competences needed to research O&SCM practice and to practice O&SCM research. The purpose of this paper is to locate these competences for young faculty in relation to their ambitions and career choices.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based upon the contributions made at European Operations Management Association 2014 Young Scholars Workshop (YSW). The theme and programme of the workshop was “Operations management – research and practice”.

Findings

The paper outlines first the concept of the YSW, the evolution of themes and the specific focus of the 2014 workshop. It concludes with a reflection on the career development of O&SCM scholars, their potential role, as academics or practitioners, in the development of O&SCM theory and practice, and the role of collaborative research in that development.

Practical implications

This paper shows what it takes for O&SCM researchers to engage with “the world around us” involves and, vice versa, how “doctorate” OM and SCM practitioners may successfully solve practical problems and engage with the O&SCM world surrounding them in doing so.

Originality/value

The paper presents a collection of viewpoints of O&SCM scholars and a reflective practitioner on the competences needed to research OM practice and to practice OM research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Sumeer Chakuu, Donato Masi and Janet Godsell

This paper explores the conditions in which logistics service providers (LSPs) can compete or collaborate with banks in offering inventory financing as a supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the conditions in which logistics service providers (LSPs) can compete or collaborate with banks in offering inventory financing as a supply chain finance (SCF) service.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study research methodology was adopted. The case study involved six LSPs across Europe. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The results highlighted that an attractive credit demand for LSPs consists in suppliers with high amounts of inventory or borrowing needs that go beyond their borrowing capacity from the perspective of a bank. LSPs can respond to this demand when they have three specific capabilities as follows: risk assessment, risk monitoring and organizational capabilities. The offer of inventory financing can be controlled by the LSPs or by the banks. When the LSPs control the offer, they offer different conditions compared to the banks in terms of credit rationing, transaction costs, payment flexibility, tax rate advantage and financial risk management. When the banks control the offer, the LSPs influence the nature of the SCF services only in terms of credit rationing and transaction costs. The LSPs seem to easily develop risk assessment and risk mitigation capabilities, while the organisational capabilities appear to be the most challenging to build, and when absent they create a barrier to the provision of inventory financing.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is twofold. First, the paper provides a comprehensive taxonomy of the factors conditioning the role of the LSPs in the provision of inventory financing as a SCF service. Second, the paper clarifies the link between the factors and the different roles played by the LSPs.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Mehmet Chakkol, Antonios Karatzas, Mark Johnson and Janet Godsell

Solutions provision depends on effective and efficient supply chains. Existing discourse within servitization has remained at the organisational or inter-organisational…

Abstract

Purpose

Solutions provision depends on effective and efficient supply chains. Existing discourse within servitization has remained at the organisational or inter-organisational level with a limited emphasis on the role of individuals. However, supply chains are not just relationships between organisations, they are complex, inter-personal relationships that span organisational boundaries. The limited focus on boundary spanners and their interactions means that managerial roles critical for the provision of solutions remain unidentified. The purpose of this paper is to identify the functions, roles and practices of boundary spanners that connect organisations and enable the effective provision of solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study comprising 61 interviews in 11 firms was conducted in the UK network of a commercial vehicles manufacturer, to investigate boundary spanning for product and solutions provision.

Findings

The functions of boundary spanners move from communicating product and price features in product provision towards strategic communication, dissonance reduction, professional education, consultation and leveraging offerings in solutions provision. The study also identifies the boundary spanning roles and practices that form these functions for solutions provision.

Originality/value

This is the first study in servitization that identifies and describes the boundary spanning functions, roles and practices. By adopting the lens of boundary spanning, the research addresses the lack of empirical managerial-level enquiry within servitization research. It extends the theoretical discussion on the differences between supply chain management in servitized vs product contexts.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Heather Skipworth, Janet Godsell, Chee Yew Wong, Soroosh Saghiri and Denyse Julien

This study aims to explain how supply chain alignment, which remains a major challenge for supply chains, can be achieved and its implications for business performance…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explain how supply chain alignment, which remains a major challenge for supply chains, can be achieved and its implications for business performance (BP) by testing the strengths of the relationships between previously identified enablers, supply chain alignment and BP.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review develops hypotheses on the relationships between enablers, alignment and BP. A survey of medium-to-large UK manufacturing companies was conducted where the sample comprised 151 randomly selected companies, and the response rate was 56 per cent. Partial least square regression was used to test the hypothesis.

Findings

Two types of supply chain alignment are defined – shareholder and customer – but only customer alignment (CA) has a direct positive impact on BP, while shareholder alignment (SA) is its antecedent. Top management support was shown to be an enabler of both shareholder and CA, while organisation structure, information sharing and performance measurement system enabled SA, while internal relational behaviour enabled CA.

Research limitations/implications

Supply chain management research lacks knowledge on exactly how supply chain alignment can be achieved and what BP implications it has. This research provides a tested conceptual model to address this gap.

Practical implications

The refined conceptual model provides precise guidance to practitioners on how to improve BP through supply chain alignment.

Originality/value

Whilst the strategic management literature emphasizes the importance of SA, this study reveals another crucial alignment – CA – and shows its direct positive impact on BP.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Janet Godsell, Andy Birtwistle and Remko van Hoek

The purpose of this paper is to report on experiences from BAT's major supply chain reconfiguration program; it details practices, lessons learnt and do's and do nots…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on experiences from BAT's major supply chain reconfiguration program; it details practices, lessons learnt and do's and do nots. There is little research that reports on how to manage major supply chain reconfiguration programs, despite the fact that it is widely acknowledged that this can be challenging.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports insights from industry, directly captured from the responsible managers in workshops and through co‐author involvement.

Findings

Seven key lessons are shared, including how to use S&OP, measurement and other specific change management tactics and practices.

Practical implications

The findings reported in this paper are “straight from the horses mouth” and are very much informed by all the experience developed inside BAT. Coupled with the focus on overall lessons, the findings will be useful for many other supply chain executives engaged in major reconfigurations.

Originality/value

This paper provieds an insight into a major supply chain design project in BAT over a six year period. This included access to senior decision makers and those actually running the change program. Case studies of this scale, scope and longitude are a rarity in supply chain strategy.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Janet Godsell, Thomas Diefenbach, Chris Clemmow, Denis Towill and Martin Christopher

Whilst there are a plethora of theoretical ideas regarding a segmented approach to supply chain strategy, there is paucity of empirical data. This paper aims to present…

Abstract

Purpose

Whilst there are a plethora of theoretical ideas regarding a segmented approach to supply chain strategy, there is paucity of empirical data. This paper aims to present the results of a field‐based case study in a fast moving consumer goods company (FMCGCo) that sought to identify the most relevant basis for supply chain segmentation.

Design/methodology/approach

Research carried out on a single instrumental case, FMCGCo. A four‐stage research design was employed to develop and test an approach to developing a segmented supply chain strategy for FMCGCo supply chain Western Europe.

Findings

The study identified demand profiling at an item level (using volume and variability classifiers) as the primary driver of supply chain strategy. It also developed a novel profiling tool. This not only segmented demand but identified through the introduction of the concept of filters a method for turning the results of the demand profiling analysis into a segmented supply chain strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The results presented are based on a single instrumental case. It is the approach that is transferable to other supply chain contexts not the specific solution per se.

Practical implications

The paper presents a practical and pragmatic approach for companies to develop a segmented supply chain strategy based on demand profiling.

Originality/value

The introduction of a new tool as a practical and relatively quick means of developing a segmented supply chain strategy, that considers both market and product characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Chee Wong, Heather Skipworth, Janet Godsell and Nemile Achimugu

The importance of supply chain alignment has been discussed since the birth of supply chain management (SCM). Yet it remains a major challenge for supply chains. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of supply chain alignment has been discussed since the birth of supply chain management (SCM). Yet it remains a major challenge for supply chains. This paper aims to systematically review the cross disciplinary literature on supply chain alignment in order to identify, and develop constructs for enablers to alignment, and an associated set of hypotheses.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic approach has been taken to the literature review, which ensures it is auditable and repeatable. The selection criteria are clearly aligned with the review question ensuring all literature pertinent to the question is identified and reviewed. Relevant information is extracted from the selected papers and synthesised into a set of hypotheses.

Findings

Six main constructs for the enablers of alignment are identified and defined: organisational structure, internal relational behaviour, customer relational behaviour, top management support, information sharing and business performance measurement system. While the literature is disparate, across different disciplines there is good support for these enablers. The relationships between supply chain alignment and shareholder and customer value are also argued with the support of the literature. Although each of the enablers is argued to positively affect shareholder and customer value, their interactions with one another are not well supported in the literature, either theoretically or empirically, and therefore this could be an area for further research.

Research limitations/implications

While the hypotheses remain theoretical, it is now possible to test them and understand the relative significance of the various enablers to alignment.

Practical implications

The significance of shareholder and customer alignment on the delivery of shareholder and customer value can be examined, thus moving towards a theory of supply chain alignment. This is needed since in practice companies are struggling with supply chain alignment.

Originality/value

The existing literature on supply chain alignment is disparate and multi‐disciplinary as this descriptive analysis shows, with 72 papers published in 43 different journals. Moreover, most of the papers focus on particular enablers, while this paper brings together six key enablers from the literature to produce a set of hypotheses.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Janet Godsell and Remko van Hoek

The purpose of this paper is to describe and detail practices that are commonly used to pursue short‐term functional targets (e.g. end of month sales targets) at the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and detail practices that are commonly used to pursue short‐term functional targets (e.g. end of month sales targets) at the expense of supply chain integration. It also aims to identify the key questions that financial analysts should be asking companies to ensure that they are not using those practices and thereby destroying shareholder value.

Design/methodology/approach

The insights were gained from the authors' hands‐on supply chain management experience and validated in discussions with supply chain executives across a range of industrial sectors (including electronics, consumer packaged goods and logistics service providers).

Findings

The paper identifies three sales and customer service practices, and two financial practices that undermine the performance of the integrated supply chain. In response it suggests alternative practices and four key questions that financial analysts should ask companies to ensure that the performance of the integrated supply chain is not sabotaged – thereby helping supply chain managers.

Practical implications

The paper can help supply chain managers dispose of value‐destructive behaviour in their organizations by offering them screens/descriptions of poor practice which they can hold up to their peers as a mirror. It provides the business imperative for change, by identifying the key questions analysts should ask to uncover value‐destroying activities.

Originality/value

Supply chain managers often share their frustration with peers in anecdotal ways. The paper describes common practices and sources of frustration, using actual data and examples.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Remko van Hoek, Janet Godsell and Alan Harrison

Guest lecturers (GLs) are a popular mechanism for transferring insights from industry into supply chain programmes. With a scarcity of capable supply chain (SC) talent in…

Abstract

Purpose

Guest lecturers (GLs) are a popular mechanism for transferring insights from industry into supply chain programmes. With a scarcity of capable supply chain (SC) talent in today's labour market, there is real value in executives contributing to SC programmes at schools and universities. By guest lecturing they can “light the fire” in students about how exciting the field and practice are and how much potential there is in considering a career in SC management. Students on SC programmes can be shown part of the way towards modern SC practice for which there is a real need for more talent. However, it may be difficult to ensure GL effectiveness; it is neither the executive's job nor his/her profession and academics often find it hard to recruit GLs.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the hands‐on experience of GLs and academics from multiple backgrounds, this paper develops both a framework that can help ensure effective use of the GL, and 11 specific tips and suggestions for recruiting and using GLs in SC programmes.

Findings

It was found that there are more creative ways to use GLs in programmes than typically considered, as well as a wider recruitment of different types of GL than those most commonly sought after and most hard to recruit.

Originality/value

This paper aims to assist educators in curriculum development and to help to ensure that, when executives offer up scarce time and experience, they maximise the impact of their service.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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