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Book part

Ronald H. Humphrey, Janet B. Kellett, Randall G. Sleeth, Chao Miao and Shanshan Qian

To examine empathy as a trait that influences leadership behaviors, which, in turn, influence group decision-making.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine empathy as a trait that influences leadership behaviors, which, in turn, influence group decision-making.

Design/Methodology/Approach

This study uses an assessment center design to maximize internal validity.

Findings

The structural equation model shows that empathy strongly relates to both relationship leadership and task leadership, while cognitive ability only relates to task leadership. Both relationship leadership and task leadership exert influence over group task choice and group decisions. Thus, empathy has its major effects through influencing leader behaviors, which, in turn, have distal impacts on outcomes such as influence over decisions.

Research Limitations/Implications

The study results should be further tested in field settings.

Practical Implications

The findings suggest that organizations should recruit and promote leaders high in empathy.

Originality/Value

This is the first study to test whether leader behaviors mediate the effects of leader empathy on group decision-making.

Details

Emotions and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-202-7

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Article

Janet B. Kellett, Ronald H. Humphrey and Randall G. Sleeth

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that perceived collective efficacy would mediate the effects of self‐efficacy on individual task performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that perceived collective efficacy would mediate the effects of self‐efficacy on individual task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An assessment center design with 147 participants in 49 three‐person groups was used.

Findings

It is found that for individuals working on an assigned group goal, perception of the group's collective efficacy, rather than self‐efficacy, has a direct influence on task performance.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers should examine the extent to which cognitive intelligence influences collective efficacy effects.

Practical implications

The research suggests that perceptions of collective efficacy and team support may influence early career developmental task performance.

Originality/value

This paper found that collective efficacy might be more important than individual efficacy in predicting individual task performance in some circumstances.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Abstract

Details

Emotions and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-202-7

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Book part

Christophe Haag and Isaac Getz

The quality of strategic decisions made at the helm of corporations matters a great deal. Predominantly, research on strategic decision-making has focused on CEOs as if…

Abstract

Purpose

The quality of strategic decisions made at the helm of corporations matters a great deal. Predominantly, research on strategic decision-making has focused on CEOs as if they decide alone. Yet in reality, even the most powerful CEO makes strategic decisions together with an executive board. This chapter offers a theoretical explanation of strategic board decision-making through the emotional contagion between the CEO and board members.

Methodology/approach

We used both previous research and qualitative material – two case studies and interviews with several dozen CEOs of large corporations as well as the board members of one of them – to build our theoretical model.

Findings

Our inBoard Emotional Contagion Model (inBECM) specifies the following individual–collective emotional dynamics: After a strategic affective event has triggered an affective discussion within the boardroom, the emotionally intelligent CEO communicates verbally in order to – through an emotional contagion – homogenize board members’ emotional states leading to shared sense-making of the event and – potentially – to improved decision-making.

Research/ Social/Practical implications

Suggestions are made for the inBECM contribution to emotion theory. Implications are stated for the key role of emotion in improving board decision-making and strategizing.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

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Book part

Sara E. Green, Rosalyn Benjamin Darling and Loren Wilbers

This chapter reviews qualitative research on parenting children with disabilities published over the last 50 years to explore whether shifts in academic discourse and…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter reviews qualitative research on parenting children with disabilities published over the last 50 years to explore whether shifts in academic discourse and changes in professional training have affected research on parenting and/or the experiences of parents who are the subject of such research.

Methodology/approach

An extensive literature search was conducted, and 78 peer-reviewed, qualitative studies on the experience of parenting a child with a disability were included in the sample. Themes were extracted from the reviewed literature and compared across decades.

Findings

The findings of the present review suggest that some aspects of the parenting experience have changed very little. In particular, parents continue to experience negative reactions such as stress and anomie, especially early in their children’s lives, and socially imposed barriers such as unhelpful professionals, and a lack of needed services continue to create problems and inspire an entrepreneurial response. In addition, stigmatizing encounters with others continue to be a common occurrence. In contrast to earlier decades, studies conducted in more recent years have begun to use the social model of disability as an analytic frame and also increasingly report that parents are questioning and challenging the concept of “normal” itself.

Social/practical implications

Additional improvements are needed in professional education and services to reduce the negative reactions experienced by parents of children with disabilities.

Originality/value of chapter

The findings of this meta-analysis can serve as a guide to future research on parenting children with disabilities.

Details

Disability and Intersecting Statuses
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-157-1

Keywords

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Book part

Roy K. Smollan, Jonathan A. Matheny and Janet G. Sayers

Published studies of the relationships between personality, affect, and organizational change have been overwhelmingly quantitative, while clinical and psychodynamic…

Abstract

Published studies of the relationships between personality, affect, and organizational change have been overwhelmingly quantitative, while clinical and psychodynamic approaches have seldom dealt with the context of organizational change. We used semistructured interviews to explore the “middle ground”, by researching how participants in change believed aspects of their personalities contributed to their responses, particularly on an affective level. We found that traits such as openness to experience, resilience, pragmatism, change self-efficacy, and locus of control influenced participants' perceptions of how they reacted to organizational change. The findings point to the important role that qualitative research into personality can play in improving understanding of emotional responses to organizational change.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Dynamism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-177-1

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Article

Rebecca Checkley, Nick Hodge, Sue Chantler, Lisa Reidy and Katie Holmes

This paper focuses on accessing the experiences of three boys who are on the autism spectrum to identify what using a voice output communication aid (VOCA), within a…

Abstract

This paper focuses on accessing the experiences of three boys who are on the autism spectrum to identify what using a voice output communication aid (VOCA), within a classroom setting, means to them. The methods used to identify the boys' perspectives are described and evaluated. Establishing these through direct methods of engagement proved problematic but working with parents and school staff as ‘expert guides’ provided a rich insight into what using a VOCA appeared to mean to the boys. The findings suggest that using a computer‐based VOCA can be viewed by children with autism as a pleasurable and motivating activity. This technology also seems to offer the potential for a much broader developmental impact for these children than that currently recognised within the research literature.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article

This new measure of consumer law of some forty‐odd sections, a short Act by present standards but as far‐reaching as any legislation since the war, establishes a code of…

Abstract

This new measure of consumer law of some forty‐odd sections, a short Act by present standards but as far‐reaching as any legislation since the war, establishes a code of conduct in commerce and trade which few will be able to ignore, from the manufacturer down to the counter‐hand. Operative from November 30th of this year, traders will require to urgently consider their sales practices, advertising, labelling and their trade descriptions; sales staff will need to be instructed in their new responsibilities. The new law is not just for consumer‐retailer transactions, but extends to trade between different branches of all trades, so that a retailer will be protected against misleading descriptions and misrepresentations by a manufacturer and the latter against misdescriptions of ingredients or components.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 70 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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