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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Jane Yarnall

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential implications of selecting and developing discrete pools of talent within organizations and to answer the question “If talent…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential implications of selecting and developing discrete pools of talent within organizations and to answer the question “If talent is singled out as a separate group of high‐potential individuals in organizations, what measures could be put in place to help ensure their effectiveness?”

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature on talent pools and examines existing case study research, drawing on an analysis of over 50 companies. This analysis was used to draw out aspects which impact the effectiveness of talent pools at particular points in time; from the initial establishment of pool members through to the ongoing maintenance of an established talent pool.

Findings

Findings indicate that during the establishment phase, ensuring appropriate segmentation of the pool and limiting bias in the nomination process were particularly significant. The ongoing maintenance of a successful talent pool was also found to be a challenge from both an organizational and an individual perspective. Specific factors that were identified were dealing with changing business needs; changing individual circumstances; providing development opportunities; maintaining senior commitment; and defining success measures.

Practical implications

The research identifies a number of critical factors that practitioners may need to address in the process of establishing and maintaining talent pools, such as pool segmentation, work‐life balance and the impact on the psychological contract.

Originality/value

The ongoing maintenance of talent pools is rarely discussed in the literature and the recommendations for practice will be relevant for all human resource and organizational development practitioners.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Jane Yarnall

Career anchor theory developed by Ed Schein in 1978 has been subject to limited further research, despite being widely used as a career tool within organisations. This article…

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Abstract

Career anchor theory developed by Ed Schein in 1978 has been subject to limited further research, despite being widely used as a career tool within organisations. This article describes the importance of career anchor data for organisational as opposed to individual use and reports on a study of the career anchors of 374 employees in the UK. The results show that age, gender and length of service have no significant effect on the distribution of anchors, although there are grade‐related differences. Suggestions are made on how career anchor distribution data could be used by organisations to determine appropriate career development strategies.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Jane Yarnall

Following a critical review of current literature on the role of line managers in career development, the article reports on research which examined the extent to which employee…

3526

Abstract

Following a critical review of current literature on the role of line managers in career development, the article reports on research which examined the extent to which employee participation in voluntary career activities is affected by differing levels of management support. Using data from 281 service company employees, this longitudinal study investigated the relationship between three variables ‐ management attitudes towards career development, management support for voluntary career development interventions and employee career satisfaction ‐ in relation to participation in a career programme. The results revealed that, counter to that predicted by the literature, high levels of management support did not encourage greater participation by employees, while negative management attitudes did. Career satisfaction was also shown to be significantly correlated to both management support and management attitudes. The consequences for practitioners designing and implementing career development programmes are highlighted.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Michael Saker and Leighton Evans

This chapter is concerned with exploring the various ways in which Pokémon Go complements or challenges family life. The chapter begins by explicating the multisided concept of…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with exploring the various ways in which Pokémon Go complements or challenges family life. The chapter begins by explicating the multisided concept of play and the myriad definitions that surround this term. Having established the various way in which this phenomenon can improve the lives of those who engage in it – physically, emotionally and cognitively – we go on to consider how play has gradually shifted from public spaces and into designated playgrounds, and how this trend corresponds with children concurrently moving away from the streets and into their bedrooms. Following this, we explore the impact digital technologies are having on the practice of parenting, paying particular attention to video games as a significant facet of youth culture that is often associated with a range of negative connotations. Yet, video games are not intrinsically bad. As we outline, research on intergenerational play and joint-media engagement (JME) readily demonstrate the many benefits families can experience when these games are played together. What is missing from this developing body of work is the familial playing of locative games and the extent to which this practice adds contours to our understanding of this field. The chapter is, therefore, driven by the following research questions. First, why and how do families play Pokémon Go? This includes the different roles that family members adopt, alongside motivations for families playing this game, how the playing of this game complements the rhythms of family life and the extent to which this hybrid reality game (HRG) is suited to intergenerational play. Second, what impact does locative familial play have on families, collectively speaking, and regarding individual family members? Here, we are not just interested in whether this game allows families to bond and how this bonding process is experienced, but also whether the familial play of Pokémon Go provides families with any learning opportunities that might facilitate personal growth beyond the game. Third, what worries might parents have about the familial playing of Pokémon Go and to what extent does the locative aspect of this game reshape their apprehensions?

Details

Intergenerational Locative Play
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-139-1

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Seymour Roworth‐Stokes and Lew Perren

This paper explores the careers of four Research Centre Directors located in university art and design departments in the UK. It examines on a case by case basis the relationship…

Abstract

This paper explores the careers of four Research Centre Directors located in university art and design departments in the UK. It examines on a case by case basis the relationship of cause and effect during critical moments of career progression. The research reinforces previous findings that suggest that promotion within Higher Education is greatly enhanced by research performance over teaching. The study goes much further in exploring the underlying relationships between the “entrepreneurial” and “autonomy” career anchors of Research Centre Directors and the corresponding impact on power relationships as their personal capital grows. In conclusion, the paper reports that a Research Centre Director’s career trajectory may be determined not only through responsibilities and research reputation in the field, but also through skilful application of political nous, strategic awareness, and tact in marrying internal research agendas with that of the Research Centre.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Tingzhen (Jane) Chen and Philip L. Pearce

Consistent exposure to sunshine with high ultraviolet values has significant negative effects on human skin. Key risks include melanoma and the rapid onset of signs of ageing. For…

Abstract

Consistent exposure to sunshine with high ultraviolet values has significant negative effects on human skin. Key risks include melanoma and the rapid onset of signs of ageing. For Chinese, these are viewed as undesirable, because their genetic legacy predisposes them to greater numbers of skin blemishes and because darker shades are culturally and socially viewed as less attractive. Properties in sunshine locations may need to modify aspects of their infrastructure and service delivery to meet the needs of the globally influential Chinese market. Shaded spaces, new activities, scheduling of experiences in the early morning, evening and at night, are all a part of the required innovations in experience design.

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Cara Peters, Jeremy A. Shelton and Jane B. Thomas

The purpose of the present study is to examine the connection between the self‐concept and fashion consumer behaviors of senior females.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to examine the connection between the self‐concept and fashion consumer behaviors of senior females.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants for the study (n=200) were recruited from 12 chapters of the Red Hat Society located in the Southeastern USA; they completed a self‐administered survey. Relational, individual and collective identities were measured via well‐established, pre‐existing scales. Statistical findings were used to examine how senior females with unique identities (i.e. relational, individual, and collective self‐concepts) differ in terms of their shopping behaviors and fashion orientation.

Findings

Statistical results from this study indicate that apparel purchase decisions for senior females are complex and involve issues beyond style, fit, and price. Information on how the identity groups differed from one another in the various shopping behaviors and their interest in fashion is identified.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an examination into the complex self‐concept of older females and its link to fashion‐related consumer behaviors. Recommendations on how specific apparel retailers can better target senior females are presented.

Originality/value

Research regarding the complex fashion needs, and purchase decisions of senior females, is sparse. This research contributes to the literature on fashion and apparel by examining how different identities relate to various fashion consumer behaviors for women over 50.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Jane Lu Hsu and Ting-Yu Lin

The purpose of this paper is to examine people’s knowledge about carbon reduction, environmental consciousness, carbon reduction intentions, and behaviours in Taiwan. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine people’s knowledge about carbon reduction, environmental consciousness, carbon reduction intentions, and behaviours in Taiwan. The importance of this study is to reveal whether individuals with higher carbon reduction knowledge level have higher carbon reduction intentions and further take actions.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, eight questions about the causes and facts of carbon emissions were designed to examine respondents’ levels of knowledge. The New Ecological Paradigm Scale was utilised to measure respondents’ attitudes towards the environment and further to examine how those attitudes were linked to knowledge. Ten questions related to carbon reduction intentions in food consumption, transportation, energy saving, recycling and shopping were designed, another set of ten questions related to carbon reduction behaviours were included in the questionnaire. A formal survey using personal interviews was administered in Taipei, Taiwan following the age and gender distributions of the population.

Findings

Findings in this study indicate that people with higher knowledge levels about carbon reduction have a stronger environmental consciousness; however, they tend to have higher intentions in carbon reduction but not in actions. Findings in this study reveal that knowledge levels about carbon reduction cannot be used as indicators of carbon reduction behaviours.

Practical implications

The findings in this study provide information for the veracity of the general public with relatively high education levels and are aware of the severity of the carbon emission issue in Taiwan but not motivated to take actions in carbon reduction. Implications of this study are that although enhancing the general public’s environmental consciousness by building up their relevant knowledge of carbon reduction through education can be essential, encourage individuals to make environmentally friendly purchasing decisions, reduce energy consumption and waste, recycle, and be conservative with materials not easily decomposed naturally is fundamental.

Originality/value

Due to the fact that people living on islands and in densely populated coastal areas are those affected by climate changes severely, findings in this study provide valuable information for the education of the general public in Taiwan and other countries in the region.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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