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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Charles D. Bodkin, Cara Peters and Jane Thomas

Company stores market to their internal employees via the distribution of branded promotional products. The purpose of this study is to investigate factors that may influence when…

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Abstract

Purpose

Company stores market to their internal employees via the distribution of branded promotional products. The purpose of this study is to investigate factors that may influence when an employee is more likely to purchase from a company store.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to the members of a chamber of commerce located in the southeastern USA. Data were analyzed using regression, and post hoc analyses were conducted using an analysis of covariance.

Findings

Organizational identification and job satisfaction significantly impacted employees’ intentions to purchase from a company store. Gender, education, marital status and years of work experience were personal factors that moderated that relationship. Firm size and employee rank were company factors that moderated the relationship between employee work perceptions and employee purchase intentions at a company store.

Originality/value

No research to date exists on company stores. This study is unique in that it proposes internal branding as a theoretical foundation for understanding company stores and examines factors that impact employees’ intentions to purchase from a company store.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-035-7

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02641619610155120. When citing the…

120

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02641619610155120. When citing the article, please cite: Jane Smith, Thomas Delaney, (1996), “Marcel: a MIME prototype study in electronic information delivery”, Interlending & Document Supply, Vol. 24 Iss: 1, pp. 24 - 27.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Article
Publication date: 24 June 2009

Vivien Caughley

Hannah King occupies a unique place in missionary and colonial history, the history of education, cross‐cultural relations and material culture in New Zealand. She was the only…

Abstract

Hannah King occupies a unique place in missionary and colonial history, the history of education, cross‐cultural relations and material culture in New Zealand. She was the only woman from the first 1814 Missionary settlement of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) in New Zealand to remain in New Zealand for the rest of her life, yet she does not have an entry in the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, and is rarely indexed in either New Zealand’s general historical works or even works more specifically related to the Missionary era. John and Hannah King were one of three artisan missionary couples who sailed with the Revd Samuel Marsden on his ship, the missionary brig ‘Active’, from Port Jackson, Australia to Rangihoua, in the Bay of Islands, in late 1814. Marsden’s 1814 Christmas Day service on the beach at Rangihoua is recognised as the beginning of missionary activity and planned European settlement on New Zealand soil.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Nancy L. Cassill, Jane B. Thomas and Erica M. Bailey

Value is a word that is frequently used by consumers, retailers and manufacturers. Understanding how consumers define value is imperative to the success of the industry. Value has…

Abstract

Value is a word that is frequently used by consumers, retailers and manufacturers. Understanding how consumers define value is imperative to the success of the industry. Value has often been defined as price or quality; other factors such as time, energy, product category and type of retail outlet may determine the definition of value by consumers. The purpose of this research was to define value, specifically how department store consumers define apparel value. Value ivas examined with two apparel products, a man's dress shirt and a woman's jacket. Research was conducted using focus groups (qualitative) and in‐store data collection (quantitative). The two hypotheses were tested by using t‐tests and forward step‐wise regression. Results from the 533 department store consumers indicated that: (a) value can be defined using qualitative and quantitative methods, (b) the definition of value was different for the two product categories, men's dress shirt and women's jacket, (c) the value definition for the majority of this study's consumers was ‘I look for the highest quality with an acceptable price’, and (d) product features and marketing attributes are weighted differently, yielding three consumer value equations for the sample's department store consumers. Implications exist for fibre producers, textile mills, apparel manufacturers and retailers in the product development and marketing of ‘value’ apparel products to meet diverse core consumer groups.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-758-6

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Jane Boyd Thomas, Ginger A. Woodward and David Herr

The next generation of shoppers is hitting the stores, and forward‐thinking retailers are following their every move. For retailers who target the teen market, developing…

Abstract

The next generation of shoppers is hitting the stores, and forward‐thinking retailers are following their every move. For retailers who target the teen market, developing strategies aimed at reaching this market are complex. This study was conducted for a large south‐eastern US department store chain which was interested in learning more about the purchasing behaviours of teenagers. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between jean purchase criteria, the type of store selected when purchasing a pair of jeans and teenagers’ purchasing behaviours. The sample consisted of teenagers aged 14 to 18 years old who were enrolled in a required economics class in four representative high schools. Results indicated that jean purchase criteria and type of store impact on both information‐seeking behaviours and price‐conscious purchasing behaviours among teenagers. For the information seeker, price, wash and brand were statistically significant and influenced the degree of information‐seeking behaviour. The cost‐conscious teenager was influenced by price, brand and quality. In addition, males and African Americans placed a greater importance on the store where purchases were made than did females and whites, respectively. Opportunities exist for all types of stores which are interested in attracting the teen market. Retailers need to understand where teenagers shop and the criteria that they use for selecting a store. Additional research needs to be conducted to investigate the cross‐shopping behaviours of teenagers and the store selection criteria they use.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Cara Peters, Jeremy A. Shelton and Jane B. Thomas

The purpose of the present study is to examine the connection between the self‐concept and fashion consumer behaviors of senior females.

4909

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to examine the connection between the self‐concept and fashion consumer behaviors of senior females.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants for the study (n=200) were recruited from 12 chapters of the Red Hat Society located in the Southeastern USA; they completed a self‐administered survey. Relational, individual and collective identities were measured via well‐established, pre‐existing scales. Statistical findings were used to examine how senior females with unique identities (i.e. relational, individual, and collective self‐concepts) differ in terms of their shopping behaviors and fashion orientation.

Findings

Statistical results from this study indicate that apparel purchase decisions for senior females are complex and involve issues beyond style, fit, and price. Information on how the identity groups differed from one another in the various shopping behaviors and their interest in fashion is identified.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an examination into the complex self‐concept of older females and its link to fashion‐related consumer behaviors. Recommendations on how specific apparel retailers can better target senior females are presented.

Originality/value

Research regarding the complex fashion needs, and purchase decisions of senior females, is sparse. This research contributes to the literature on fashion and apparel by examining how different identities relate to various fashion consumer behaviors for women over 50.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Emma Jane Riddle, David A. Bradbard, Jane Boyd Thomas and Doris H. Kincade

In response to international competition and pressure from retailers, US apparel manufacturers and their suppliers initiated the Quick Response (QR) program. QR seeks to provide…

Abstract

In response to international competition and pressure from retailers, US apparel manufacturers and their suppliers initiated the Quick Response (QR) program. QR seeks to provide retailers with the exact stock‐keeping units (SKUs) which consumers demand and to deliver these SKUs quickly. An effective QR program requires rapid transmission of data throughout the value chain, from the retailer back to apparel manufacturers, fabric producers and fibre manufacturers. Therefore, electronic data interchange (EDI) is a key component of QR and should be tightly linked with other information systems at each level of the value chain. This research is an empirical study of the degree to which EDI has been implemented by US apparel manufacturers and the extent to which EDI is integrated with other information systems. It was found that apparel manufacturers use EDI to establish tight linkages with their customers, the retailers. Manufacturers are less likely to increase their own efficiencies by linking EDI with internal information systems or by establishing EDI linkages with suppliers. The lack of supplier linkages may reduce manufacturers' ability to replenish retail inventories quickly, which is the primary objective of QR.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Jane E. Thomas

Smoking is the most common form of addiction in the UK. Figures from the General Household Survey for 1980 show that more than seventeen million people, 42% of males and 37% of…

Abstract

Smoking is the most common form of addiction in the UK. Figures from the General Household Survey for 1980 show that more than seventeen million people, 42% of males and 37% of females over the age of 16, are regular smokers. The health hazards associated with smoking are well established, but they go far beyond the lung cancer and cardiovascular disease story.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 82 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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