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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Phil Hubbard, Teela Sanders and Jane Scoular

The purpose of this paper is to explore the contemporary regulation of sex work in England and Wales, placing this in the context of debates concerning morality, evidence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the contemporary regulation of sex work in England and Wales, placing this in the context of debates concerning morality, evidence and the efficacy of policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This brief paper is based on reflections on the authors’ research and their contribution to policy debates over the last two decades.

Findings

This paper presents prostitution policy as morality policy and suggests that it remains overwhelmingly based on the idea that prostitution is immoral and hence must be inherently harmful.

Practical implications

The paper makes a strong case for evidence-based policy in an area where morality tends to promote a partial and selective reading of evidence. Here, parallels are drawn with policies regulating other pleasurable but “sinful” activities, including the consumption of drugs and alcohol.

Social implications

It is argued that the dominance of a particular policy approach to sex work perpetuates stigma for those in the sex industries and exacerbates risks of harm.

Originality/value

By highlighting the moral dimensions of prostitution policy, the paper shows that the drift towards the criminalisation of sex work in England and Wales is not informed by academic evidence.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Jane Scoular, Jane Pitcher, Rosie Campbell, Phil Hubbard and Maggie O'Neill

This article considers the likely success of recent reforms of prostitution policy by reflecting on a recent Joseph Rowntree Foundation‐funded study that examined the…

Abstract

This article considers the likely success of recent reforms of prostitution policy by reflecting on a recent Joseph Rowntree Foundation‐funded study that examined the experiences of those living and working in areas of street sex work. This empirical work points to some of the dangers of policy frameworks and techniques of control that continue to situate sex work as antithetical to the cultivation of community safety.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2008

Jane Pitcher, Rosie Campbell, Phil Hubbard, Maggie O’Neill and Jane Scoular

Measures to tackle anti-social behaviour and nuisance to residents, particularly in urban areas, have been a major focus of UK Government policies over recent years. The…

Abstract

Measures to tackle anti-social behaviour and nuisance to residents, particularly in urban areas, have been a major focus of UK Government policies over recent years. The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 and subsequent legislation such as the Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003 introduced stricter powers, particularly through the use of anti-social behaviour orders (ASBOs), as a means of addressing problems in residential neighbourhoods. While there is clearly a need to tackle problem behaviour that impacts seriously on the quality of life of community members, evidence also suggests that behaviour previously tolerated by many is now targeted through enforcement measures, leading to increased polarisation and stigmatisation of some groups (Rowlands, 2005). At the same time, national agendas around Neighbourhood and Civic Renewal1 aim to minimise conflicts in neighbourhood renewal areas through fostering understanding and building bridges between different groups within diverse communities. There is thus some tension between the different agendas which impacts on how such issues are addressed within localities.

Details

Qualitative Urban Analysis: An International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1368-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Roger Matthews

Abstract

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2008

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Urban Analysis: An International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1368-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Maggie O'Neill

This article argues that there are two main barriers preventing imagining and actioning an inclusive, holistic strategy for prostitution reform in the UK. It identifies…

Abstract

This article argues that there are two main barriers preventing imagining and actioning an inclusive, holistic strategy for prostitution reform in the UK. It identifies five key tenets needed to improve the situations for men and women involved in selling sex. Findings from innovative research methods are used to explore how community safety may be improved.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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