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Article

Jane Schofield

Discusses the identification, treatment and application of theright finishes to early buildings, with particular emphasis onlime‐based materials. Examines the role of lime…

Abstract

Discusses the identification, treatment and application of the right finishes to early buildings, with particular emphasis on lime‐based materials. Examines the role of lime in historical building construction and the lime cycle. Outlines limewash varieties and looks at its traditional use, mentioning its advantageous ability to breathe and cut down on condensation problems. Describes removing old paint and the appropriate use of distemper. Suggests that despite drawbacks, lime‐based materials are cheaper and more enjoyable to use than modern equivalents.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article

Jane Schofield

Examines early time‐based ornamental plasterwork in the UnitedKingdom. Discusses the origins, methods, supporting structures, originalfinish and repairs and problems of…

Abstract

Examines early time‐based ornamental plasterwork in the United Kingdom. Discusses the origins, methods, supporting structures, original finish and repairs and problems of this plasterwork. Concludes that plasterwork can be maintained no matter what condition it is in, so \ill\ action should be centred on helping later conservation by, for example, propping and padding vulnerable plasterwork.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article

Jane Schofield

Discusses the techniques of repair and conservation of earlylime‐based plasterwork. Considers the problems of cracks in plaster,detachment of plates of plaster, the…

Abstract

Discusses the techniques of repair and conservation of early lime‐based plasterwork. Considers the problems of cracks in plaster, detachment of plates of plaster, the breaking up of plaster, and the stages in the repair of wall panels and overmantles and the re‐hanging of ceilings. Concludes that since old plaster cannot be reproduced, careful consideration procedures are necessary, although complete plasterwork is best left alone.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article

Jane Schofield

Advocates the use of lime in the repair of old buildings ratherthan the hard, but brittle, impervious materials used in cement mixestoday. Points out the advantages of…

Abstract

Advocates the use of lime in the repair of old buildings rather than the hard, but brittle, impervious materials used in cement mixes today. Points out the advantages of lime in indoor and outdoor repairs. Describes the natural cycle of lime production and gives general advice not only on how to use, store and identify the different types of lime on sale today, but also on the precautions to be taken when using lime.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Abstract

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Popular Music, Popular Myth and Cultural Heritage in Cleveland: The Moondog, The Buzzard, and the Battle for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-156-8

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Article

LOUGHBOROUGH was the first of the post‐war schools to be established in 1946. This resulted from negotiations of representatives of the Library Association Council with…

Abstract

LOUGHBOROUGH was the first of the post‐war schools to be established in 1946. This resulted from negotiations of representatives of the Library Association Council with technical and other colleges which followed their failure to secure facilities within the universities on the terms of the L.A. remaining the sole certificating body. The late Dr. Herbert Schofield accepted their terms and added a library school to already varied fields of training within his college.

Details

New Library World, vol. 67 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Sally Shaw and Sarah Leberman

The purpose of this research is to examine the experiences of female CEOs in New Zealand sport using a career account approach overlaid with the Kaleidoscope Career Model…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the experiences of female CEOs in New Zealand sport using a career account approach overlaid with the Kaleidoscope Career Model (KCM). This research focuses on their successful careers, rather than constraints and barriers, which is a feature of much previous research in the area.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews and analysis were informed by the principles of the KCM of career authenticity, balance and challenge. Seven chief executive officers in New Zealand sport organizations were interviewed. Data analysis was undertaken through a three-step coding process.

Findings

Respondents highlighted the importance of authenticity, balance and challenge in different ways. The KCM model is extended by identifying sub-themes within each principle. These were, under authenticity, passion and relationship-building; under balance, self-awareness and influencing the organization; and under challenge, taking opportunities and working in sport’s gendered environment. Findings indicate that a more nuanced development of KCM is required and that decision-makers in sport organizations need to be aware of the varied drivers of women’s positive experiences.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to an understanding of successful women’s careers, rather than focusing on barriers to success. It also extends the KCM. Future research is necessary to examine the viability of our suggested extensions to the KCM.

Practical implications

While not generalizable, this study’s findings suggest that sport organization decision-makers would be well advised to understand the unique ways in which authenticity, balance and challenge are understood by their female employees. This may encourage organizations to look more closely at their cultures to ensure that they are more welcoming and supportive to women in a male-dominated industry.

Originality/value

This research contributes to an understanding of successful women’s careers, rather than focusing on barriers to success. It also extends the KCM. Future research is necessary to examine the viability of our suggested extensions to the KCM.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article

June Thoburn and Mark E. Courtney

Out‐of‐home care has been a subject for policy debate since child welfare policies were first developed. Too often the debate is marked by ill‐informed sound‐bites linking…

Abstract

Purpose

Out‐of‐home care has been a subject for policy debate since child welfare policies were first developed. Too often the debate is marked by ill‐informed sound‐bites linking “care” with negative descriptors such as “drift” or “languish”. The purpose of this paper is to urge a more nuanced understanding informed by the large volume of research from across jurisdictional boundaries.

Design/methodology/approach

The historical, cultural and political contexts in which studies on children's out‐of‐home care have been conducted are reviewed, since these impact on the characteristics of the children, the aims of the care service in any particular jurisdiction, and the outcomes for those entering care. The paper also scopes the large volume of English language descriptive and process research (and the smaller number of outcome studies) on the different placement options.

Findings

The outcomes of out‐of‐home care are different for different groups of children, and care needs to be taken not to over‐simplify the evidence about processes and outcomes. The generally negative view of the potential of out‐of‐home care is not based on evidence.

Originality/value

The authors, from their North American and UK/European perspectives, provide an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses, both of the available research and of the care services themselves.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part

Gregori Galofré-Vilà, Andrew Hinde and Aravinda Meera Guntupalli

This chapter uses a dataset of heights calculated from the femurs of skeletal remains to explore the development of stature in England across the last two millennia. We…

Abstract

This chapter uses a dataset of heights calculated from the femurs of skeletal remains to explore the development of stature in England across the last two millennia. We find that heights increased during the Roman period and then steadily fell during the “Dark Ages” in the early medieval period. At the turn of the first millennium, heights grew rapidly, but after 1200 they started to decline coinciding with the agricultural depression, the Great Famine, and the Black Death. Then they recovered to reach a plateau which they maintained for almost 300 years, before falling on the eve of industrialization. The data show that average heights in England in the early nineteenth century were comparable to those in Roman times, and that average heights reported between 1400 and 1700 were similar to those of the twentieth century. This chapter also discusses the association of heights across time with some potential determinants and correlates (real wages, inequality, food supply, climate change, and expectation of life), showing that in the long run heights change with these variables, and that in certain periods, notably the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, the associations are observable over the shorter run as well. We also examine potential biases surrounding the use of skeletal remains.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-582-1

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Book part

Michael K. Heine

Purpose – Using the example of the Dene Games competition, this chapter examines the connections between contemporary sports and the games of the Dene…

Abstract

Purpose – Using the example of the Dene Games competition, this chapter examines the connections between contemporary sports and the games of the Dene (Athapaskan), a group of indigenous cultures inhabiting the subarctic regions of the Canadian Northwest Territories.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter is based on participant-observation and individual interviews conducted during attendance at the Dene Games gatherings over the course of several years.

Findings – I argue that the indigenous Dene Games gathering, where traditional games are organised as a contemporary sports competition, opens a space for the reconstitution of indigenous physical activity practices. The tensions that occur when participation in indigenous games articulates to the practical logic of competitive sports, identify the Dene Games as a space of active cultural contestation.

Originality/value – The chapter examines the articulation of historically disparate social practises. It views the hysteretic effects of a pre-existing indigenous physical activity practice as a point of reference for resistance to the normative constraints emanating from the organisational modality of contemporary sports, without offering up an explanation that relies on voluntaristic assumptions of agency. It adopts this perspective in order to avoid grasping the indigenous practice as the operationalised object of its own intervention, a ‘museum piece’.

Details

Native Games: Indigenous Peoples and Sports in the Post-Colonial World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-592-0

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