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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2010

Jane Salvage and Rob Keukens

This article explores the social context, prevalence and treatment of problems related to dual diagnosis in the countries of Eastern Europe, drawing on an extensive…

Abstract

This article explores the social context, prevalence and treatment of problems related to dual diagnosis in the countries of Eastern Europe, drawing on an extensive literature search as well as the authors' wide personal experience of working with mental health reformers in policy, education and service delivery in most countries in the region. It describes the region's historical and societal background, and sets out basic epidemiological information, including the rate and impact of mental illness and alcohol and substance abuse. It reviews what services are available for people with dual and triple diagnosis; outlines the barriers to progress; and makes recommendations for improvements.

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Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Jane Salvage

The issue of workforce planning in nursing is explored. The problemof nurse shortages and how this might be met are addressed. The conceptof skill mix in nursing is…

Abstract

The issue of workforce planning in nursing is explored. The problem of nurse shortages and how this might be met are addressed. The concept of skill mix in nursing is discussed and the ramifications clarified. It is noted that the most effective means of dealing with workforce planning is not by applying complex systems designed by others but by involving the staff themselves in solving the problem. The importance of making nursing staff feel valued is stressed. A case study outlining the development of quality cycles in an elderly persons′ unit is described.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Abstract

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2010

Liz Hughes

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Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Staffan Appelgren

The purpose of this paper is to adopt posthumanist perspectives on waste as traces of life to investigate how the alternative heritage work of redesigners transforms…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to adopt posthumanist perspectives on waste as traces of life to investigate how the alternative heritage work of redesigners transforms discarded building materials into reuse interior designs. It combines recent research on waste, shifting focus from representational and symbolic aspects to its material and indexical relations to human life, with critical perspectives emphasising heritage as encompassing different and ambiguous ways of engaging with material transformation over time.

Design/methodology/approach

Anthropological fieldwork involving participant observation was conducted over six months to closely examine the entanglement between redesigners and reuse materials in interior design work.

Findings

The sensory ethnographic approach reveals how materials are approached as unfolding processes rather than closed objects. Tracing how redesigners capitalise on the ambiguity of traces of life in building materials, the paper shows how uncertainty and risk are inevitable companions when working with reuse. To rehabilitate used things, and reassociate with materials classified as waste or heritage, means following their trajectories of becoming and responding to their signs of life. While involving important benefits, this often leads to the inconvenient and risky mess characteristic of an interconnected and entangled multispecies world.

Originality/value

Ethnographic analyses of reuse design are few. In particular, there is a lack of studies informed by posthumanist theories recognising the social and ecological embeddedness and mutual entanglement of humans and materials. By studying practices for extending the lifespan of salvaged materials external to formal heritage management this paper contributes with perspectives to revitalise heritage practices, while highlighting the neglect of socio-historic values of materials within circular economy.

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Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

Grady McRae

It's been nearly 20 years since the introduction of commercial jet powered aircraft. The powerplants which made these aircraft possible have proven to be extremely…

Abstract

It's been nearly 20 years since the introduction of commercial jet powered aircraft. The powerplants which made these aircraft possible have proven to be extremely reliable. “Prolonging Engine Service Life” became a natural economic objective of the airlines, and the initial practice of overhauling engines at specified intervals gradually evolved into the current on‐condition maintenance concept designed to minimise operating costs. While these practices and extensive parts repair activities resulted in major economies, the resultant extended operation of hardware has in many cases caused more frequent engine removals and often ultimately more extensive parts replacement. In addition, engine fuel consumption has been compromised to varying degrees.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Dorothy W. Grigg

The purpose of this paper is to explore the acts that constitute cyber‐bullying and to see how from a lay concept these acts are classified.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the acts that constitute cyber‐bullying and to see how from a lay concept these acts are classified.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered using two groups of participants (two Australian participants and three British participants may posit different cultural views). The first set of data was generated through cyber‐bullying element extraction from cyber‐bullying literature and interviews were conducted with five college students (three from the United Kingdom and two from Australia). The second set was generated through open ended demonstration of internet negative acts such as sending unwanted messages, rude images, threats and malicious messages in a scenario classification questionnaire. This involved the recruitment of 114 first year undergraduate psychology students in the United Kingdom. The scenario questionnaire measured participants' categorisation of internet negative acts from a lay perspective. Participants' perceptions of cyber‐bullying were examined through grounded theory and thematic narratives to see how these findings differ from literature in the cyber‐bullying arena.

Findings

Emerging theory indicates the need to treat cyber‐bullying as a standalone entity without the confounding role that the more traditional concept of bullying plays in cyber bullying definitions. Additionally, internet negative acts, irrespective of their terminological classifications, were perceived as immoral and anti‐social. Suggestions were made to aid practitioners' to implement interventions against cyber‐bullying.

Research limitations/implications

Participant numbers at stage one were limited. Thus, it is suggested future replication(s) of this study employ(s) a larger number of participants so as to ascertain the generalisability of findings. It is also suggested that potential future studies should employ quantitative analyses to further triangulate the findings of the current study.

Originality/value

The strength of the present study lies in its rich qualitative triangulation, as well as its focus on exploring elements that constitute cyber‐bullying from a lay perspective.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Documents can now be produced, reproduced and refined so effortlessly that the electronic office has actually resulted in an increase in the use of paper — paper that…

Abstract

Documents can now be produced, reproduced and refined so effortlessly that the electronic office has actually resulted in an increase in the use of paper — paper that costs offices money to buy and money to dispose of. Of the thousands of tonnes of paper thrown away each year, it has been estimated that 130 000 tonnes could be economically recovered and recycled. Besides recycling there are other measures to be considered — avoiding waste by using each piece of paper fully before discarding it; restricting the number of copies made of a document, — which may be applicable to particular offices. Here we are looking at the two faces of recycling: the salvage of paper to be sold to be reprocessed into ‘recycled’ paper, and the purchase of the recycled paper to use in place of ‘virgin’ paper. Virgin paper is made from trees either chemically pulped, when it is known as ‘wood free’ or mechanically pulped.

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Facilities, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

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Abstract

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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59

Abstract

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Reference Reviews, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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