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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Mary Duffy, Erica Wimbush, Jane Reece and Douglas Eadie

The Internet has revolutionised information exchange. Its rapid connection of users and materials locally and globally make it an ideal health promotion medium, for both…

Abstract

The Internet has revolutionised information exchange. Its rapid connection of users and materials locally and globally make it an ideal health promotion medium, for both the public and professionals. However, the mechanisms through which it might contribute to health improvement are unclear. This paper provides an overview of Internet developments and presents findings from research carried out on behalf of the Health Education Board for Scotland, illustrating some of the assumptions implicit in using the Internet for health promotion. In the absence good evidence on the effects of delivering health promotion online, this paper argues that good practice requires greater responsiveness to user needs and circumstances at the planning stage, better quality assurance, more clearly defined indicators of “success” and the pathways to it, and more comprehensive evaluation of short‐ and long‐term impacts and outcomes.

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Health Education, vol. 103 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1900

A pæan of joy and triumph which speaks for itself, and which is a very true indication of how the question of poisonous adulteration is viewed by certain sections of “the…

Abstract

A pæan of joy and triumph which speaks for itself, and which is a very true indication of how the question of poisonous adulteration is viewed by certain sections of “the trade,” and by certain of the smaller and irresponsible trade organs, has appeared in print. It would seem that the thanks of “the trade” are due to the defendants in the case heard at the Liverpool Police Court for having obtained an official acknowledgment that the use of salicylic acid and of other preservatives, even in large amounts, in wines and suchlike articles, is not only allowable, but is really necessary for the proper keeping of the product. It must have been a charming change in the general proceedings at the Liverpool Court to listen to a “preservatives” case conducted before a magistrate who evidently realises that manufacturers, in these days, in order to make a “decent” profit, have to use the cheapest materials they can buy, and cannot afford to pick and choose; and that they have therefore “been compelled” to put preservatives into their articles so as to prevent their going bad. He was evidently not to be misled by the usual statement that such substances should not be used because they are injurious to health— as though that could be thought to have anything to do with the much more important fact that the public “really want” to have an article supplied to them which is cheap, and yet keeps well. Besides, many doctors and professors were brought forward to prove that they had never known a case of fatal poisoning due to the use of salicylic acid as a preservative. Unfortunately, it is only the big firms that can manage to bring forward such admirable and learned witnesses, and the smaller firms have to suffer persecution by faddists and others who attempt to obtain the public notice by pretending to be solicitous about the public health. Altogether the prosecution did not have a pleasant time, for the magistrate showed his appreciation of the evidence of one of the witnesses by humorously rallying him about his experiments with kittens, as though any‐one could presume to judge from experiments on brute beasts what would be the effect on human beings—the “lords of creation.” Everyone reading the evidence will be struck by the fact that the defendant stated that he had once tried to brew without preservatives, but with the only result that the entire lot “went bad.” All manufacturers of his own type will sympathise with him, since, of course, there is no practicable way of getting over this trouble except by the use of preservatives; although the above‐mentioned faddists are so unkind as to state that if everything is clean the article will keep. But this must surely be sheer theory, for it cannot be supposed that there can be any manufacturer of this class of article who would be foolish enough to think he could run his business at a profit, and yet go to all the expense of having the returned empties washed out before refilling, and of paying the heavy price asked for the best crude materials, when he has to compete with rival firms, who can use practically anything, and yet turn out an article equal in every way from a selling point of view, and one that will keep sufficiently, by the simple (and cheap) expedient of throwing theory on one side, and by pinning their faith to a preservative which has now received the approval of a magistrate. Manufacturers who use preservatives, whether they are makers of wines or are dairymen, and all similar tradesmen, should join together to protect their interests, for, as they must all admit, “the welfare of the trade” is the chief thing they have to consider, and any other interest must come second, if it is to come in at all. Now is the time for action, for the Commission appointed to inquire into the use of preservatives in foods has not yet given its decision, and there is still time for a properly‐conducted campaign, backed up by those “influential members of the trade” of whom we hear so much, and aided by such far‐reaching and brilliant magisterial decisions, to force these opinions prominently forward, in spite of the prejudice of the public; and to insure to the trades interested the unfettered use of preservatives,—which save “the trade” hundreds of thousands of pounds every year, by enabling the manufacturers to dispense with heavily‐priced apparatus, with extra workmen and with the use of expensive materials,—and which are urgently asked for by the public,—since we all prefer to have our foods drugged than to have them pure.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Jane Z. Sojka, Ashok K. Gupta and Dawn R. Deeter‐Schmelz

To enhance our understanding of the optimal buyer‐seller dyad composition in different cultures, this study investigates differences in male and female buyers’ perceptions…

Abstract

To enhance our understanding of the optimal buyer‐seller dyad composition in different cultures, this study investigates differences in male and female buyers’ perceptions of male and female sales representatives in Pakistan. Data collected from 88 Pakistani buyers reveal that although male and female salespeople were perceived somewhat differently depending on the buyer’s gender, many similarities were also found. In addition, buyers did not perceive salespeople of the same gender more positively than salespeople of the opposite gender. Most of the male buyers did not perceive sales to be an appropriate career for Pakistani women. Overall, the results suggest female Pakistani sales representatives are more relationship‐oriented, and some male Pakistani buyers may prefer working with female salespeople.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2000

Jane Z. Sojka, Ashok K. Gupta and Timothy P. Hartman

While sales careers offer tremendous job potential, they are frequently overlooked by graduating college students. Previous research suggests that negative sales…

Abstract

While sales careers offer tremendous job potential, they are frequently overlooked by graduating college students. Previous research suggests that negative sales stereotypes have influenced students’ desire for sales careers. In this paper we revisit student attitudes toward sales careers to identify student segments most likely to have positive and realistic views of sales careers. We found that marketing majors or students who have taken two or more sales classes view sales careers more positively than other business students. Non‐marketing majors or students exposed to sales careers either through internships/work experience or having family members in sales did not exhibit positive attitudes toward sales. We also observed some interesting gender differences on attitudes toward sales. We suggest that corporate recruiters may want to focus their recruiting efforts on marketing majors or students who have taken sales classes to identify students with positive and realistic views of sales careers: resulting in better employee task fit, lower job turnover, and reduced costs of recruitment.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2010

Pamela Qualter, Jane Ireland and Kathryn Gardner

Some studies assess impairments in emotional functioning of offenders using measures of emotional intelligence (EI). Such measures were developed for use in general…

Abstract

Some studies assess impairments in emotional functioning of offenders using measures of emotional intelligence (EI). Such measures were developed for use in general populations, and may not be suitable for offender samples. This study explores the factor structure of a commonly used trait EI measure for a sample of adult male offenders, and comments on its usefulness as a measure of emotional functioning for this group. We find that, although the SSREI can be indicated to be multi‐dimensional, the exact nature of its factors remains unclear for forensic samples. We conclude by suggesting that the social contexts and encounters that provoke emotion may be different for offenders and non‐offenders, and that there is a need to develop a trait EI measure specific to forensic populations.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Anne Gimson

Abstract

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Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Angela M. Cirucci

In defining microcelebrity, media technologies are often described as integral to the self-branding process. This chapter argues that social network platforms are not…

Abstract

In defining microcelebrity, media technologies are often described as integral to the self-branding process. This chapter argues that social network platforms are not social utilities, but, in fact, celebrification utilities. That is, they are programmed to necessarily brand users by extracting and filtering identifications to be easily consumed by advertisers, just as microcelebrities promote specific, “authentic” aspects of self that can be easily consumed by fans. Through a discourse analysis of Facebook’s functionalities and in-depth interviews with 45 emerging adults, I present an analysis of microcelebrity culture through the narratives of everyday users who are not actively involved in self-branding but are instead compelled by the site’s inherent design to unintentionally brand – they unknowingly align with corporation-like mission statements; ignore multiple, dynamic selves; and discard their right to anonymity.

Details

Microcelebrity Around the Globe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-749-8

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Peter Totterdill and Rosemary Exton

This paper aims to discuss how Interactive Theatre can be implemented and it also gives examples of it in action with feedback from clients. Unlocking employee creativity…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss how Interactive Theatre can be implemented and it also gives examples of it in action with feedback from clients. Unlocking employee creativity is one of the key challenges of implementing organisational change to improve performance and enhance working life.

Design/methodology/approach

Interactive Theatre is a dynamic event that helps to release employee inhibitions that prevent them from expressing their views while engaging them in critical reflection and creative thinking through facilitated dialogue and collaboration.

Findings

Using theatre to dramatise the issues and situations created by poor work organisation, inadequate skills and ineffective management practice encourages employers and employees alike to take action. Drama reveals all the tensions and problems that can exist in the business, while at the same time being fun and captivating. As a result, people are more likely to have an open mind about the need for change and to become actively involved in its design and implementation.

Originality/value

This paper discusses how Interactive Theatre can be implemented and gives examples of it in action with feedback from clients.

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Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2005

Joshua C. Wilson

This article focuses on one court case concerning the regulation of Anti-Abortion protesting and asks: (1) Do the various actors involved in this case recognize a tension…

Abstract

This article focuses on one court case concerning the regulation of Anti-Abortion protesting and asks: (1) Do the various actors involved in this case recognize a tension between their actions and their broader beliefs concerning the regulation of political protests? (2) If this tension is recognized, how do the actors resolve it, and if it is not recognized, why is it not? While concerned with legal consciousness and cognitive dissonance, the article is framed by broader questions concerning tolerance and the interaction of law and political passions.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-327-3

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Marie-Cécile Cervellon and Stephen Brown

Abstract

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Revolutionary Nostalgia: Retromania, Neo-Burlesque and Consumer Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-343-2

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