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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Leah Marks and Jane Ogden

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate an online “teachable moment” intervention to promote healthy eating for overweight and food intolerance symptoms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate an online “teachable moment” intervention to promote healthy eating for overweight and food intolerance symptoms.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involves a 2×2 factorial design with two conditions: group (weight loss vs food intolerance) and condition (intervention vs control). The intervention aimed to generate a “teachable moment” by providing knowledge regarding the relationship between food and the problem (overweight or food intolerance), focussing on the negative aspects of the problem, creating a behavioural model, and encouraging hope and reinvention. Participants receiving the intervention (n=22) completed measures of dietary behaviour and either weight or food intolerance symptoms before receiving the intervention and again one month later. Control participants (n=20) provided measures but did not receive the intervention.

Findings

There were no significant reductions in weight or food intolerance symptoms. However, compared to control participants, participants in the intervention conditions reported greater intentions to eat healthily (p=0.01) and improved healthy eating behaviour over time, following both an intention-to-treat (p=0.046) and explanatory analysis (p=0.042).

Practical implications

Encouraging individuals to perceive their everyday situation as a time for change and adopt healthier behaviour early on, may prevent future diet-related medical events. This has benefits for both the individual and for health care costs.

Originality/value

A quick and easy-to-administer online “teachable moment” intervention improves dietary behaviour and can be minimally adapted to suit individuals with differing health needs.

Details

Health Education, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Sarah-Jane F. Stewart and Jane Ogden

The purpose of this study is to explore how individuals with overweight and obesity living in the UK respond to the public health and media messaging surrounding COVID-19 and…

1993

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how individuals with overweight and obesity living in the UK respond to the public health and media messaging surrounding COVID-19 and obesity.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interview study with a think aloud protocol. A total of 10 participants self-reported to have overweight, obesity or as actively trying to lose weight were recruited through social media and were asked to think aloud whilst exposed to four sets of public health and media materials describing the link between COVID-19 and obesity. Interviews were conducted over zoom, recorded and transcribed verbatim.

Findings

Three primary themes were identified through thematic analysis: “flawed messaging”, “COVID-19 as a teachable moment” and “barriers to change”. Transcending these themes was the notion of balance. Whilst the messaging around COVID-19 and obesity was deemed problematic; for some, it was a teachable moment to facilitate change when their future self and physical health was prioritised. Yet, when focussing on their mental health in the present participants felt more overwhelmed by the barriers and were less likely to take the opportunity to change.

Practical implications

Findings hold implications for public health messaging, highlighting the need for balance between being educational and informative but also supportive, so as to achieve maximum efficacy.

Originality/value

This study offers a novel and useful insight into how the public health and media messaging concerning COVID-19 risk and obesity is perceived by those with overweight and obesity.

Details

Health Education, vol. 122 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2024

Jane Ogden and Alissa Chohan

Previous research demonstrates a consistent association between the media and body and eating related issues in children. Recent research has highlighted a role for “fat talk” to…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research demonstrates a consistent association between the media and body and eating related issues in children. Recent research has highlighted a role for “fat talk” to describe discourses around body size and food. One key source of media information is Disney animation films, yet to date no research study has explored the verbal content of this genre.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study used a content analysis to examine fat talk in Disney animation films (1937–2021; n = 53) with a focus on the frequency of fat talk, changes over time and differences between the genders and heroic statuses of the givers and receivers of fat talk. Fat talk was defined as relating to both body size and food and could be either positive or negative.

Findings

Results revealed that there was more negative than positive fat talk per film; no significant changes over time; males were the givers of significantly more positive and negative fat talk than females and were also the receivers of more negative fat talk; good characters were the givers and receivers of more positive and negative fat talk and more self-directed negative fat talk than bad characters.

Practical implications

The results are discussed in terms of possible legislation and parenting interventions to minimise the harm of this genre on young children.

Originality/value

Disney animation films may not be as benign as often thought.

Details

Health Education, vol. 124 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Anita Mehay, Rosie Meek and Jane Ogden

Prisons offer a public health opportunity to access a group with multiple and complex needs and return them to the community with improved health. However, prisons are not…

Abstract

Purpose

Prisons offer a public health opportunity to access a group with multiple and complex needs and return them to the community with improved health. However, prisons are not conducive to optimal health and there are few frameworks to guide efforts. This study aims to generate insights into health literacy across a young adult prison population, specifically examining the level of limitations, barriers and characteristics associated with these limitations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place in a single prison in England for young adult men aged 18–21 years old. A mixed-methods design was adopted with 104 young men completing a quantitative survey and qualitative semi-structured interviews with 37 young men.

Findings

72% (n = 75) of young men scored as limited in their health literacy. Barriers included structural restrictions, limited access to formal support and social and natural disruptions. No demographic characteristics or smoking intentions/behaviours predicted limited health literacy, but characteristics of the prison were predictive. Physical problems (sleep, nausea, tiredness and headaches), mental health and well-being (anxiety, depression and affect) and somatisation problems were also predictive of limitations.

Practical implications

Prison healthcare services and commissioners should undertake regular health literacy needs assessments to support developments in reducing barriers to healthcare and increasing health improvement efforts. Action also requires greater political will and investment to consider broader action on the wider determinants of (prison) health.

Originality/value

The study provides a framework to understand and guide prison health efforts and highlights attention needed at the level of governments, prison leaders and their health systems.

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

R. Michelle Rich, Jane Ogden and Linda Morison

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact on stress and work-related outcomes of an app-delivered mindfulness-based program (MBP; Headspace®) offered to employees in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact on stress and work-related outcomes of an app-delivered mindfulness-based program (MBP; Headspace®) offered to employees in a UK higher education (HE) institution.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a randomized waitlist control trial design, participants were randomly allocated to be offered a mindfulness-based program (MBP) immediately for 2 months or after a waiting list period of 2 months (WLC). Data were analyzed using Intention to Treat (ITT; MBP n = 62; WLC n = 63); with supplementary analysis restricting to those who completed all measures; (MBP n = 45; WLC n = 56) and then further restricting the MBP group to those who completed at least foundation level 1 of the app; (MBP n = 31; WLC n = 56).

Findings

The ITT analysis showed significant increases in several aspects of mindfulness and a significant reduction in perceived stress but no significant effects for work-related outcomes. Analysis restricted to MBP participants who completed the app foundation course showed a similar pattern but in addition showed significant increases in work-life balance and the emotional aspect of job engagement.

Practical implications

The offer of the Headspace® app in the HE sector may result in reduced perceived stress. If improvements in work-related outcomes are also to be seen, then users need to be encouraged to complete a minimum level of practice.

Originality/value

Effect size estimates for stress and work-related outcomes of an app-delivered MBP contribute to the evolving picture of MBPs in the workplace.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Jane Ogden, Lauren Smith, Helen Nolan, Rachel Moroney and Hannah Lynch

Media images of unrealistic beauty have been identified as a determinant of women's body dissatisfaction. This experimental study aims to explore whether the negative impact of…

3103

Abstract

Purpose

Media images of unrealistic beauty have been identified as a determinant of women's body dissatisfaction. This experimental study aims to explore whether the negative impact of such images could be reduced by a one‐time educational intervention consisting of a presentation and discussion, teaching women to be critical of media images.

Design/methodology/approach

Female psychology students (n=176) from a university in the UK were randomly assigned to the control or intervention group and completed measures of body dissatisfaction after being challenged by images of the perfect female body. Follow up data were collected four weeks later.

Findings

The results suggested that the intervention had no immediate buffering effect on body dissatisfaction but participants in the intervention group showed a long‐term improvement for confidence, attractiveness and body‐parts dissatisfaction.

Practical implications

This one‐time intervention could be used to protect young women against the detrimental impact of media images in the longer term.

Originality/value

This study provides an evidence base for the use of an educational intervention for young people in schools and colleges.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Jane Ogden and Faye Sherwood

This experimental study seeks to explore the impact of media images on women's body dissatisfaction and to assess whether this impact could be reduced by an educational…

3776

Abstract

Purpose

This experimental study seeks to explore the impact of media images on women's body dissatisfaction and to assess whether this impact could be reduced by an educational intervention describing the power of air‐brushing.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved a 2×2 factorial design with two conditions: picture (thin vs fatter) and air‐brushing intervention (present vs absent). A total of 200 women completed measures of body dissatisfaction before and after viewing the experimental information.

Findings

The results showed that women felt consistently more dissatisfied with their bodies after viewing thin pictures and more satisfied after viewing fatter pictures. In addition, the air‐brushing intervention reduced the detrimental effect of viewing the thinner pictures but had no effect on the benefits of viewing the fatter pictures.

Originality/value

Media images may have a role to play in body dissatisfaction in women. But a simple intervention focusing on air‐brushing can facilitate a more critical perspective and thus provide a buffer against the influence of media images.

Details

Health Education, vol. 108 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Emma Wolfe, Jane Ogden and Leigh Clare

A repeated measures cohort study was conducted to investigate the impact of attending a day treatment programme on physical and psychological state, and to assess which baseline…

Abstract

A repeated measures cohort study was conducted to investigate the impact of attending a day treatment programme on physical and psychological state, and to assess which baseline factors predicted level of recovery. Physical and psychological outcomes of treatment were analysed for 116 patients admitted to the treatment programme between 1996 and 2006 and were found to be in line with previous day care evaluations, with the majority of patients showing improvements on all measures. A multiple regression analysis revealed several factors to be predictive of treatment outcomes including patient demographics, comorbidities and traumatic life events. In particular, those patients who benefited most from the treatment had a lower body mass index at admission, stayed longer at the unit, were older, less likely to have other physical and psychiatric comorbidities, particularly obsessive compulsive disorder or a history of sexual abuse, and whose most predominant eating disorder problem was characterised by low weight.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Helen Brunger, Jonathan Serrato and Jane Ogden

Ex‐service personnel face numerous and significant problems upon discharge from the forces. The purpose of this paper is to explore experiences of the transition from military to…

Abstract

Purpose

Ex‐service personnel face numerous and significant problems upon discharge from the forces. The purpose of this paper is to explore experiences of the transition from military to civilian life and to identify some of the barriers and facilitators to re‐employment.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews were carried out with 11 ex‐servicemen who had previously served in the UK armed forces and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

Findings

Participants described their experiences in terms of three broad themes: characteristics of a military life; loss as experienced upon return to civilian life; and the attempt to bridge the gap between these two lives. Transcending these themes was the notion of identity, illustrating that the transition from military to civilian life can be viewed as a shift in sense of self from soldier to civilian.

Research limitations/implications

The current study only recruited male ex‐service personnel and therefore the findings may not accurately represent the experiences of female service leavers.

Practical implications

The military needs to ensure that not only is support provided for all service personnel, but that it goes beyond basic vocational advice. Although the needs of ex‐service personnel are defined by factors other than unemployment, such as trauma or the sudden loss of security, they do relate back to unemployment in some capacity. Methodological changes to the discharge process could help this population to achieve a more continuous trajectory rather than a fragmented one.

Originality/value

The present study has provided further insight into the identity experiences of ex‐service personnel along their journey from soldier to civilian. Breakwell's Identity Process Theory provided a valuable framework for understanding the experiences of ex‐service personnel.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Mabel Blades

Outlines the programme of presentations made at the Symposium on Dietitians and Dietary Treatments for Obesity: A Move towards Evidence‐based Practice, held on 25 November 1997 at…

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Abstract

Outlines the programme of presentations made at the Symposium on Dietitians and Dietary Treatments for Obesity: A Move towards Evidence‐based Practice, held on 25 November 1997 at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London. Provides brief details as to the extent of obesity in the UK and to current practices to deal with the problem.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of 78