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The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article

Stuart James

Notes that for whatever market – educational or general– low price paperback classic series have continued to expandrapidly and in the UK the market is dominated by…

Abstract

Notes that for whatever market – educational or general – low price paperback classic series have continued to expand rapidly and in the UK the market is dominated by Penguin and the Oxford University Press. States that the classic anthology remains one of the most influential forms of publishing poetry and that Oxford has been dominant in issuing throughout the twentieth century a series of magisterial anthologies which have gone a long way to establishing the canon of English poetry. Concludes that neither student nor general reader has ever been so well provided with such a wide range of truly classic literature at moderate prices from a range of publishers.

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New Library World, vol. 92 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Remy Low, Eve Mayes and Helen Proctor

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a broad theoretical orientation for the themed section of History of Education Review, “Unstable concepts in the history of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a broad theoretical orientation for the themed section of History of Education Review, “Unstable concepts in the history of Australian schooling: radicalism, religion, migration”. Through the conceptual frame of “contrapuntal historiography”, it commends the practice of re-looking at taken-for-granted concepts and re-readings of the cultural archive of Australian schooling, with especial attention to silences, discontinuities and the movements of concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on Edward Said’s approach of “contrapuntal reading”, this paper refers to the recent work of Bruce Pascoe as an exemplar of this practice in the field of Australian history. It then relates this approach to the study of the history of Australian schooling as demonstrated in the three papers that make up the themed section “Unstable concepts in the history of Australian schooling: radicalism, religion, migration”.

Findings

Following in the style of Said’s contrapuntal reading and the example of Pascoe’s work, this paper argues that there are inerasable traces of historical politics – that is, the records of constitutive exclusions and silences – which “haunt” taken-for-granted concepts like the migrant, the secular and the radical in the history of Australian schooling.

Originality/value

Taken alongside the three papers in the themed section, this paper urges the proliferation of different theoretical and disciplinary approaches in order to think anew about silences, discontinuities and movements of concepts as a counterpoint to dominant narrative lines in the history of Australian education.

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History of Education Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Reference Reviews, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Inside Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-565-8

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ARNOLD BENNETT was a man of two worlds. In the terms of Max Beerbohm's cartoon “Old Self” was plump, wealthy, self‐assured, a landmark of the London scene, a familiar of…

Abstract

ARNOLD BENNETT was a man of two worlds. In the terms of Max Beerbohm's cartoon “Old Self” was plump, wealthy, self‐assured, a landmark of the London scene, a familiar of press magnates, the owner of a yacht; “Young Self” was thin, ambitious, far‐sighted, industrious, secretly terribly anxious to justify himself to himself and decidedly provincial.

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New Library World, vol. 68 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Elizabeth Mansfield, Jane Sandercock, Penny Dowedoff, Sara Martel, Michelle Marcinow, Richard Shulman, Sheryl Parks, Mary-Lynn Peters, Judith Versloot, Jason Kerr and Ian Zenlea

In Canada, integrated care pilot projects are often implemented as a local reform strategy to improve the quality of patient care and system efficiencies. In the…

Abstract

Purpose

In Canada, integrated care pilot projects are often implemented as a local reform strategy to improve the quality of patient care and system efficiencies. In the qualitative study reported here, the authors explored the experiences of healthcare professionals when first implementing integrated care pilot projects, bringing together physical and mental health services, in a community hospital setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Engaging a qualitative descriptive study design, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 healthcare professionals who discussed their experiences with implementing three integrated care pilot projects one year following project launch. The thematic analysis captured early implementation issues and was informed by an institutional logics framework.

Findings

Three themes highlight disruptions to established logics reported by healthcare professionals during the early implementation phase: (1) integrated care practices increased workload and impacted clinical workflows; (2) integrating mental and physical health services altered patient and healthcare provider relationships; and (3) the introduction of integrated care practices disrupted healthcare team relations.

Originality/value

Study findings highlight the importance of considering existing logics in healthcare settings when planning integrated care initiatives. While integrated care pilot projects can contribute to organizational, team and individual practice changes, the priorities of healthcare stakeholders, relational work required and limited project resources can create significant implementation barriers.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Elizabeth Barkham, Santhana Gunasekaran and Caroline Lovelock

The purpose of this paper is to offer a general review of care for individuals on the autism spectrum, including Asperger's syndrome within a medium secure setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a general review of care for individuals on the autism spectrum, including Asperger's syndrome within a medium secure setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors undertook a review of the current literature relating to pathways to care, offending characteristics and treatment interventions. They examined the available evidence and current practice.

Findings

Available evidence suggests offending characteristics of individuals with autism are different to those of mental disorders such as schizophrenia. Limited evidence in treatment interventions and in risk management for those with autism presents a challenge to clinicians. The heterogeneity makes a strong case for an individualised case formulation approach to treatment and risk management.

Originality/value

This paper offers an overview of the current evidence base relating to the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders within medium secure settings.

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Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Eddie Chaplin, Jane McCarthy and Lisa Underwood

The purpose of this paper is to offer an overview of the issues from studies that have tried to estimate rates of offending.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer an overview of the issues from studies that have tried to estimate rates of offending.

Design/methodology/approach

Brief review.

Findings

There is currently no consensus on the prevalence of people with autism spectrum conditions who offend, due to the limited evidence base. It is also difficult to generalise findings across the criminal justice system and secure services.

Originality/value

This paper brings together a summary of key studies that have estimated the numbers of offenders with autism spectrum conditions over the last 30 years.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Reference Reviews, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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