Search results

1 – 10 of 28
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Jane Landon

A new report from the National Heart Forum argues that coronary heart disease could lose its position as the leading single cause of death in the UK if only knowledge we have now…

907

Abstract

A new report from the National Heart Forum argues that coronary heart disease could lose its position as the leading single cause of death in the UK if only knowledge we have now can be turned into effective policy action. Tackling health inequalities, largely due to relative poverty, must begin in childhood. National nutrition policies are needed to lower average blood cholesterol levels and unhealthy weight gain. Healthy choices in food and lifestyle must be available to all, not just the better off. Government strategies to tackle smoking must be matched by similar strategies for nutrition and physical activity. A failure to act, particularly to raise nutritional standards across the board, could result in an alternative scenario of huge and costly increases in the number of coronary care patients.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Georgina Cairns, Marisa De Andrade and Jane Landon

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility and utility of developing an independently defined and accredited benchmark standard for responsible food marketing. To…

1102

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility and utility of developing an independently defined and accredited benchmark standard for responsible food marketing. To identify provisional evidence and insights on factors likely to be critical to its successful development and its capacity to strengthen the effectiveness of responsible food marketing policy.

Design/methodology/approach

Desk-based cross-policy domain case study.

Findings

There is promising evidence that the development and deployment of an evidence-based, independently defined and verified responsible food marketing standard is feasible. Provisional findings on factors critical to the development of an effective standard and strategically significant evidence gaps are presented as insights in support of future food marketing policy and research planning.

Research limitations/implications

Further investigation of these preliminary findings is required.

Practical implications

The study has provisionally identified an innovative intervention with the potential to strengthen statutory, voluntary and internationally coordinated food marketing control policy approaches.

Originality/value

This is the first report of research into the potential for an independent benchmark standard to advance and strengthen responsible food marketing policy goals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Jane Lu Hsu and Vikki Wei‐Ting Chiu

Complaint handling has the great influence on customer retention and provides a chance for businesses to improve service quality. This study intended to reveal the complaint…

1480

Abstract

Purpose

Complaint handling has the great influence on customer retention and provides a chance for businesses to improve service quality. This study intended to reveal the complaint actions of adolescent customers and perceptions of failure recovery in buffet restaurants with a linkage of family communication patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

A consumer survey was administered in the metropolitan area of Taipei. Quota sampling procedure was applied following the age and gender distribution of the population between the ages of 13 and 19. Consent from parents was obtained prior to the survey.

Findings

Based on the results of the study, adolescent customers with high concept‐ and high socio‐orientation were prone to complain for dissatisfaction. Private actions were preferred by adolescent customers to express dissatisfaction, followed by using the internet or through actions of parents. For service recovery, adolescents preferred to have discounts, followed by free desserts. The results indicated that adolescents were more straightforward and they wanted to have compensations immediately. Furthermore, service recovery satisfaction showed a positive relationship with repeat purchases. Adolescent customers who were satisfied with service or food compensations would be likely to have repeat purchases. Nevertheless, adolescents who were unsatisfied with the service or food recovery did not totally cease purchasing.

Practical implications

Buffet managers should give inducements to encourage adolescents to complain spontaneously. Buffet managers may offer discounts for the current consumption rather than coupons for next patronage. Adolescent customers with concept‐ and socio‐orientation will provide useful information for buffet managers to improve their service quality.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into the area that has not been studied exclusively, complaint behavior of adolescent customers in buffet restaurants.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

Book part
Publication date: 2 November 2009

Ole Rummel

This chapter presents a model of distribution dynamics in the presence of measurement error in the underlying data. Studies of international growth convergence generally ignore…

Abstract

This chapter presents a model of distribution dynamics in the presence of measurement error in the underlying data. Studies of international growth convergence generally ignore the fact that per capita income data from the Penn World Table (PWT) are not only continuous variables but also measured with error. Together with short-time scale fluctuations, measurement error makes inferences potentially unreliable. When first-order, time-homogeneous Markov models are fitted to continuous data with measurement error, a bias towards excess mobility is introduced into the estimated transition probability matrix. This chapter evaluates different methods of accounting for this error. An EM algorithm is used for parameter estimation, and the methods are illustrated using data from the PWT Mark 6.1. Measurement error in income data is found to have quantitatively important effects on distribution dynamics. For instance, purging the data of measurement error reduces estimated transition intensities by between one- and four-fifths and more than halves the observed mobility of countries.

Details

Measurement Error: Consequences, Applications and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-902-8

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Jeanne M. Hogarth, Marianne A. Hilgert and Jane M. Kolodinsky

Using data from the Survey of Consumers, this study focuses on consumer’s resolution efforts with credit card problems and the likelihood of “exiting” – that is, discontinuing the…

7699

Abstract

Using data from the Survey of Consumers, this study focuses on consumer’s resolution efforts with credit card problems and the likelihood of “exiting” – that is, discontinuing the use of a given credit card or of the financial institution associated with the card. Among all households with a problem, nearly two‐thirds (63 percent) were able to resolve their problem, while over half (55 percent) exited. Exit was associated with marital status, race, how dissatisfied the consumer was, number of problems related to credit cards, and attribution. Holding all else constant, consumers who were likely to resolve their problem were only half as likely to exit. Thus, credit card companies need to carefully and quickly address their customers’ problems and resolve their complaints.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Krysti N. Ryan

The emergence of gender-nonconforming behavior in a child presents an opportunity and, often, significant pressure for parents to question the gender beliefs they have taken for…

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of gender-nonconforming behavior in a child presents an opportunity and, often, significant pressure for parents to question the gender beliefs they have taken for granted. The purpose of this research is to examine how parents of gender-diverse youth respond to such pressures and ultimately come to understand and support their children’s gender identity.

Methodology/approach

This research is guided by Ridgeway’s theoretical concept of gender as a primary frame for coordinating social life. Using in-depth interviews with 36 supportive parents of gender-diverse children, the author details the process by which parents developed a critical consciousness of gender and subsequently adopted trans-affirming beliefs in response to their children’s gender-nonconformity.

Findings

Findings illustrate the power of gender as a primary frame for organizing life within the family as well as the circumstances under which hegemonic gender beliefs can be disrupted and alternative beliefs can be formed. The analysis shows that the process of making space for gender diversity within the home, which is taken on almost exclusively by mothers, invokes competing maternal mandates of raising “proper” children versus modeling selfless devotion to children’s happiness and well-being. As mothers navigate these conflicting requirements to create greater gender freedom for their children, they reinforce and perpetuate gender stereotypes that cast women as natural caregivers. Ironically, the work of intensive mothering is also the mechanism through which women come to develop alternative gender beliefs that they then use to expand gender possibilities for their children.

Details

Gender, Sex, and Sexuality Among Contemporary Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-613-6

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Abstract

Details

Innovation and the Arts: The Value of Humanities Studies for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-886-5

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Jane Solomon, Crispin Day, Adrian Worrall and Peter Thompson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of prolonged investment in one quality improvement method, which are uncertain. The authors aim to examine the extent to which…

413

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of prolonged investment in one quality improvement method, which are uncertain. The authors aim to examine the extent to which sustained involvement in a quality network over five years led to improved performance against standards, and whether improvement was achieved in areas where service staff could exercise direct control.

Design/methodology/approach

A prospective cohort design was used to examine data from 48 UK inpatient child and adolescent mental health units between 2005/2006 and 2009/2010, which had been Quality Network for In-patient CAMHS members for two years. These were selected to remove the initial marked increase in compliance identified in an earlier study. The main outcome measure was compliance with organisation process standards.

Findings

Units meeting “excellent” quality status across all standards rose from seven (14.6 per cent) to 18 (37.5 per cent). Standards for Environment and Facilities and Access, Admission and Discharge improved the most. Units meeting the “excellent” quality status for criteria over which staff had direct control criteria rose from 17 (35.4 per cent) to 29 (60.4 per cent) over the five-year period. The unit modal quality status categorisation for criteria where staff had no direct control in 2005/2006 was “poor” (n=25; 52.1 per cent) but had progressed to “good” in 2009/2010 (n=24; 50.0 per cent).

Originality/value

The authors provide evidence that sustained investment in one QI method raises service compliance against standards. Trends showed improvement for direct control standards from “good” to “excellent” levels and improvement for no direct control from “poor” to “good”.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

1 – 10 of 28