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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2004

Ian Kerr and Jane Bailey

This paper aims to examine some of the broader social consequences of enabling digital rights management. The authors suggest that the current, mainstream orientation of…

Abstract

This paper aims to examine some of the broader social consequences of enabling digital rights management. The authors suggest that the current, mainstream orientation of digital rights management systems could have the effect of shifting certain public powers into the invisible hands of private control. Focusing on two central features of digital rights management ‐ their surveillance function and their ability to unbundle copyrights into discrete and custom‐made products ‐ the authors conclude that a promulgation of the current use of digital rights management has the potential to seriously undermine our fundamental public commitments to personal privacy and freedom of expression.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Elspeth McCartney, Jane Kerr, Linda Cannon and Peter J. Martin

Reports a survey of 1990 and 1991 graduates entering the speech andlanguage therapy profession in the UK. Questions focused on theinduction and support measures received…

Abstract

Reports a survey of 1990 and 1991 graduates entering the speech and language therapy profession in the UK. Questions focused on the induction and support measures received from managers. Also investigates the experiences of six new therapists in one “good practice” area, Ayrshire and Arran Health Board, with a package of support measures implemented. Results showed that new therapists were given a great deal of help and support, and valued it highly. They welcomed information on policies and practices, and there is a need for even more written information. They made successful personal adaptations to the work environment, and managers felt that they were effective overall. The study serves as a benchmark for small professions entering the NHS before reforms alter employment context. Suggests that good professional managerial practices will have to be carefully maintained.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Elspeth McCartney, Jane Kerr, Linda Cannon and Peter Martin

Reports on a survey of 1990 and 1991 graduates entering the speechand language therapy profession in the UK and on the experiences of sixnew therapists in one “good…

Abstract

Reports on a survey of 1990 and 1991 graduates entering the speech and language therapy profession in the UK and on the experiences of six new therapists in one “good practice” area, Ayrshire and Arran Health Board. Results show that new therapists were given a great deal of help and support from professional managers, and valued it highly. They chose posts which offered a mixed client load and good induction packages. Pre‐service training reflected work carried out in service, but all client groups had not been accessed during training. Issues relating to throughput and case‐load management required most support. They made successful personal adaptations to the work environment, and managers found them effective overall. Calculates the costs of supporting new therapists. Highlights the need to maintain professional support and discusses the potential difficulties involved in doing so in relation to NHS reforms.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

David Cochran

One of the most colorful and free‐spirited publishers in U.S. history, the Charles H. Kerr Publishing Company of Chicago has also made an impressive mark on that history…

Abstract

One of the most colorful and free‐spirited publishers in U.S. history, the Charles H. Kerr Publishing Company of Chicago has also made an impressive mark on that history. As this country's oldest alternative publishing house—founded in 1886—it has been closely associated with such movements as populism, freethought, socialism, and the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), as well as various currents of labor and social radicalism of more recent years. The Kerr Company has also established itself as a leading publisher of original works and reprints in the field of labor and radical history. Several generations of America's progressives and dissidents have relied heavily on Kerr publications for their education and inspiration. For libraries with a focus on labor, politics, women, reform movements, anarchism, socialism, pacifism, radical fiction, popular culture, and the broad counter‐culture, Kerr books are indispensable.

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Collection Building, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2020

Elizabeth Mansfield, Jane Sandercock, Penny Dowedoff, Sara Martel, Michelle Marcinow, Richard Shulman, Sheryl Parks, Mary-Lynn Peters, Judith Versloot, Jason Kerr and Ian Zenlea

In Canada, integrated care pilot projects are often implemented as a local reform strategy to improve the quality of patient care and system efficiencies. In the…

Abstract

Purpose

In Canada, integrated care pilot projects are often implemented as a local reform strategy to improve the quality of patient care and system efficiencies. In the qualitative study reported here, the authors explored the experiences of healthcare professionals when first implementing integrated care pilot projects, bringing together physical and mental health services, in a community hospital setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Engaging a qualitative descriptive study design, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 healthcare professionals who discussed their experiences with implementing three integrated care pilot projects one year following project launch. The thematic analysis captured early implementation issues and was informed by an institutional logics framework.

Findings

Three themes highlight disruptions to established logics reported by healthcare professionals during the early implementation phase: (1) integrated care practices increased workload and impacted clinical workflows; (2) integrating mental and physical health services altered patient and healthcare provider relationships; and (3) the introduction of integrated care practices disrupted healthcare team relations.

Originality/value

Study findings highlight the importance of considering existing logics in healthcare settings when planning integrated care initiatives. While integrated care pilot projects can contribute to organizational, team and individual practice changes, the priorities of healthcare stakeholders, relational work required and limited project resources can create significant implementation barriers.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Jaquelyn Osborne, Emma Kavanagh and Chelsea Litchfield

Social media provides a space for female athletes to create their own media (and advertising) in order to share their lives through stories presented online – a…

Abstract

Social media provides a space for female athletes to create their own media (and advertising) in order to share their lives through stories presented online – a phenomenon, that to date has been ignored in traditional media spaces. Research suggests that athletes more broadly can take a more active role in their public presentation across a wide variety of platforms (Lebel & Danylchuk, 2012) and share more aspects of their identity than typically portrayed in mainstream media coverage (Sanderson, 2013, 2014). More specifically, virtual worlds have created platforms through which female athletes can share content and present themselves to fans or followers of sport in their own way and with relative freedom (Litchfield & Kavanagh, 2018). While it is acknowledged that social media can empower the female user, simultaneously, these spaces have proven to be hostile and can serve to oppress or marginalise individuals and groups (Kavanagh et al., 2016; Litchfield et al., 2018). An intersectional, third-wave feminist lens will be adopted in this chapter in order to examine such a dichotomy (Bruce, 2016). This approach will analyse the disjunction between the rise of the female ‘@thlete’ and their adoption of contemporary digital sporting spaces and the presence of a darker narrative permeating digital environments through highlighting the presence of online vitriol and intersectional abuse (racist, sexist, homophobic, etc.) that athletes may face while navigating lives online.

Details

The Professionalisation of Women’s Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-196-6

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Kristen Thomasen and Suzie Dunn

Perpetrators of Technology-Facilitated gender-based violence are taking advantage of increasingly automated and sophisticated privacy-invasive tools to carry out their…

Abstract

Perpetrators of Technology-Facilitated gender-based violence are taking advantage of increasingly automated and sophisticated privacy-invasive tools to carry out their abuse. Whether this be monitoring movements through stalkerware, using drones to nonconsensually film or harass, or manipulating and distributing intimate images online such as deepfakes and creepshots, invasions of privacy have become a significant form of gender-based violence. Accordingly, our normative and legal concepts of privacy must evolve to counter the harms arising from this misuse of new technology. Canada's Supreme Court recently addressed Technology-Facilitated violations of privacy in the context of voyeurism in R v Jarvis (2019) . The discussion of privacy in this decision appears to be a good first step toward a more equitable conceptualization of privacy protection. Building on existing privacy theories, this chapter examines what the reasoning in Jarvis might mean for “reasonable expectations of privacy” in other areas of law, and how this concept might be interpreted in response to gender-based Technology-Facilitated violence. The authors argue the courts in Canada and elsewhere must take the analysis in Jarvis further to fully realize a notion of privacy that protects the autonomy, dignity, and liberty of all.

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Technology Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

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Content available

Abstract

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Catherine Walton and Mike Kerr

– The purpose of this paper is to assess the prevalence and nature of presentation of unipolar depression in individuals with Down syndrome (DS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the prevalence and nature of presentation of unipolar depression in individuals with Down syndrome (DS).

Design/methodology/approach

The PRISMA (2009) checklist for systematic review was followed where possible.

Findings

Eight studies were included in the qualitative synthesis from a total of 634 records identified. The quality of the studies was then assessed: the studies all scored either 5 or 6 out of 6. The incidence of depression ranged between studies from 5 to 13 per cent. It was found that depression is more common in DS than the general intellectual disability population; this on a background of mental ill health of all causes being less common in DS. It was suggested that, excluding organic disorders, depression is the most common psychiatric problem in DS. In terms of the nature of depression, the evidence was less clear. Various “vegetative” and biological symptoms were observed, with no fixed pattern. There was evidence for withdrawal symptoms and psychosis.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of studies included in this review, and their heterogeneity, highlights the need for further original research in this field.

Practical implications

An increased awareness of the frequency of depression in individuals with DS will aid in a timely diagnosis, therefore reduce psychiatric morbidity. Clinicians should be aware of the varied presentation, with no clear clinical picture, in order to maintain a high index of suspicion in an individual presenting with “atypical” symptoms.

Originality/value

This review has provided preliminary evidence that depression may be the most commonly experienced psychiatric disorder in DS.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Kay Whitehead

In Australia as elsewhere, kindergarten or pre-school teachers’ work has almost escaped historians’ attention. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the lives and…

Abstract

Purpose

In Australia as elsewhere, kindergarten or pre-school teachers’ work has almost escaped historians’ attention. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the lives and work of approximately 60 women who graduated from the Adelaide Kindergarten Training College (KTC) between 1908 and 1917, which is during the leadership of its foundation principal, Lillian de Lissa.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a feminist analysis and uses conventional archival sources.

Findings

The KTC was a site of higher education that offered middle class women an intellectual as well as practical education, focusing on liberal arts, progressive pedagogies and social reform. More than half of the graduates initially worked as teachers, their destinations reflecting the fragmented field of early childhood education. Whether married or single, many remained connected with progressive education and social reform, exercising their pedagogical and administrative skills in their workplaces, homes and civic activities. In so doing, they were not only leaders of children but also makers of society.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the links between the kindergarten movement and reforms in girls’ secondary and higher education, and repositions the KTC as site of intellectual education for women. In turn, KTC graduates committed to progressive education and social reform in the interwar years.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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