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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Lucy Garrod, Jane Fossey, Catherine Henshall, Sandra Williamson, Alice Coates and Helen Green

The purpose of this paper is to report on a service evaluation of a competency-based dementia training programme for clinicians to establish its value in improving their knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a service evaluation of a competency-based dementia training programme for clinicians to establish its value in improving their knowledge and confidence of dementia care and to explore any resulting changes to practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed method quantitative and qualitative data, using rating scales and focus group discussions (FGDs), were collected. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyse changes in the responses to the rating scales of knowledge and confidence and thematic analysis of FGDs was undertaken to identify staff perceptions of the impact of training on their practice.

Findings

In total, 162 qualified and clinical support staff undertook the training. A significant change in knowledge and confidence scores was found on all three scales. In general, feedback on the course was positive. Seven themes, demonstrating the relevance of the training to practice, emerged from the FGDs – experiential training awareness of diagnosis, approach, understanding, communication, risk, changed practice and going forward.

Practical implications

Providing competency-based dementia training for large numbers of staff can have a positive effect on the care delivered to patients with dementia.

Originality/value

Healthcare organisations have a responsibility to ensure their staff have the training to provide quality care for patients living with dementia. This paper suggests this can be achieved through a collaborative, multi-disciplinary approach involving co-production and best practice guidance.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2013

Johan M.G. van der Dennen

Purpose – This chapter contributes to comparative biopolitics and reviews primatological literature, especially about our nearest relatives, the Great Apes…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter contributes to comparative biopolitics and reviews primatological literature, especially about our nearest relatives, the Great Apes.

Design/methodology/approach – Biopolitics in this chapter means evolutionarily informed political science, with emphasis on power relations. I review the literature on intrasexual and intersexual dominance interactions among individuals and competitive and/or agonistic interactions among groups in the Great Apes (Hominidae, formerly Pongidae): orangutan (Pongo with two species and three subspecies), gorilla (Gorilla with four subspecies), bonobo (Pan paniscus), and common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes with four subspecies). In the final section I present some (speculative) thoughts on Pan prior or the modern human ancestor.

Findings – Not only Man is a political animal.

Originality/value – Impartial, objective, and as complete as possible review of the literature for the students of (comparative) politics, ethology, and psychology.

Details

The world of biology and politics: Organization and research areas
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-728-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2023

Annie Irvine and Jane Suter

This study addresses a gap in evidence on small employer experiences of managing mental health problems in the workplace. The authors gathered first-hand experiences of small…

Abstract

Purpose

This study addresses a gap in evidence on small employer experiences of managing mental health problems in the workplace. The authors gathered first-hand experiences of small business managers to empirically investigate how the small business context affects the management and support of mental health problems in the workplace, and the practice implications that arise.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interviews, combining semi-structured and narrative approaches, with 21 small business managers with experience of managing employees with mental health difficulties. The 21 managers recounted a total of 45 employee cases, which were analysed thematically, using a case-based matrix. Study participants were drawn from small businesses within England and Scotland (UK). Interviews were conducted between November 2019 and February 2020.

Findings

Support aligned with current understanding of effective practice, yet was often informal, instinctive and flexible. Accommodating employees with mental health problems impacted the workload of managers and co-workers, and business operation and growth. Challenges and tensions reflected the difficult balancing act faced by managers in organisations of all sizes. However, the intensity and immediacy of cross-pressures was enhanced for small businesses, due to their smaller workforce and lack of dedicated Human Resource Management and occupational health expertise.

Practical implications

Guidance should address the navigation of day-to-day management and support for employees with mental health difficulties, including approaches to balancing the needs of the wider workforce and business operation. Access to HR and occupational health expertise is valuable. Financial subsidies may be of lesser concern to small businesses.

Originality/value

This study offers originality in focusing exclusively on small business managers with first-hand experience of supporting employees with mental health problems. Findings challenge the perception that small firms have unique experiences, whilst highlighting contextual features that exacerbate intensity and immediacy of impacts.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

We recall Sidney Greenstreet's profile of Humphrey Bogart in The Maltese Falcon: ‘Upon my soul sir, you are a character, you really are.’ The same might be said of Gorby, the…

Abstract

We recall Sidney Greenstreet's profile of Humphrey Bogart in The Maltese Falcon: ‘Upon my soul sir, you are a character, you really are.’ The same might be said of Gorby, the leader of the second most powerful country in the world, whose stated philosophy over seventy years has been: profit is a moral evil.

Details

Work Study, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Frida Andréasson, Jan Aidemark, Lennart Magnusson, Anna Strömberg and Elizabeth Jane Hanson

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on carers’ experiences of being involved in the development of a web-based support programme for carers of people with heart failure…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on carers’ experiences of being involved in the development of a web-based support programme for carers of people with heart failure (CPwHF), and discuss the challenges related to their involvement in the development process. The focus was on the different phases in the project as well as the methodological challenges and opportunities that occurred in the user group sessions conducted.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopt an explorative design studying a co-design process to develop an information and communication technology based support programme for and with CPwHF. Habermas’ concepts of lifeworld and system are used as a theoretical framework to analyse the co-design process employed in the study.

Findings

Reflecting on the co-design approach adopted, the findings highlight the methodological challenges that arise with carer involvement and the possible tensions that occur between researchers’ ambitions to include users in the design process, and the goal of developing a product or service, in the different phases of the design process.

Originality/value

Findings highlight that there is a tension between the system and lifeworld in the co-design process which are not totally compatible. The paper highlights that there is a need to develop flexible and reflexive human-centred design methodologies, able to meet carers’ needs and ideas, and at the same time balance this with proposed research outcomes.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2023

Chrysostomos Apostolidis, Jane Brown and Jillian Farquhar

This study aims to explore stigma in payday borrowing by investigating how the stigma associated with using such a service may spill over and affect other people, entities and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore stigma in payday borrowing by investigating how the stigma associated with using such a service may spill over and affect other people, entities and relationships beyond the user within a service ecosystem.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews exploring consumers’ lived experiences and stigma were combined with publicly available reports from key stakeholders within the payday loan (PDL) industry to create a qualitative, text-based data set. The transcripts and reports were then analysed following thematic protocols.

Findings

Analysis reveals that the stigma associated with using a stigmatised service spills over, affecting not only the borrower but other actors within the service ecosystem. The analysis uncovers three important interactions that spilled over between the actors within the stigmatised service ecosystem (SSE), which can be damaging, enabling or concealed.

Research limitations/implications

This study introduces and explores the concept of “SSEs” and investigates the impact of stigma beyond the dyadic relationships between service providers and users to consider the actors within the wider ecosystem. The findings reframe existing understandings about stigma, as this study finds that stigmatised services can play both a positive (enabling) and a negative (damaging) role within an ecosystem, and this study uncovers the role of stigma concealments and how they can affect relationships and value co-creation among different actors.

Practical implications

This study provides evidence for more robust policies for addressing stigma in different SSEs by mapping the effects of stigma spillover and its effects on the borrower and other actors.

Originality/value

This study contributes to reframing marketing priorities by extending existing work on consumer stigma by showing how the stigma of a PDL may spill over and affect other actors within a service ecosystem. Significantly, the interactions between the actors may have positive as well as negative outcomes.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 57 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Elizabeth Choinski

An average person's memory of the last biology book he or she has read is likely one of a dry tome lugged back and forth to a high school or college biology class. “Good books”…

Abstract

An average person's memory of the last biology book he or she has read is likely one of a dry tome lugged back and forth to a high school or college biology class. “Good books” and “biology” are not naturally linked in people's minds. This is an unfortunate occurrence, but one that is easily remedied. For anyone with a little curiosity about biology and a penchant for good books, the following bibliography provides some guidance. All but one of the authors included are or were trained as scientists. They all have a couple of traits in common, namely a passion for their work and a desire to share this passion with anyone who will listen. It is our good fortune that they are also excellent writers.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Mary A. Malina and Basil P. Tucker

Purpose – The authors investigate the interpretations of senior university decision-makers on three questions: (1) What constitutes “relevant” research? (2) In what ways is the…

Abstract

Purpose – The authors investigate the interpretations of senior university decision-makers on three questions: (1) What constitutes “relevant” research? (2) In what ways is the relevance of research typically measured? and (3) What alternative ways might be adopted in measuring the relevance of research?

Design/methodology/approach – This exploratory study adopts an inductive approach, informed by data collected from semi-structured interviews with senior research-related university leaders and archival sources in five Australian and eight US universities.

Findings – There is considerable convergence in the conceptualization as well as the operationalization of the notion of relevance between the Australian and US universities participating in this study. The evidence supports a relational rather than currently prevailing transactional approaches in operationalizing the concept of research relevance. This relational approach emphasizes the importance of stakeholders, their needs and expectations, and their engagement in the articulation of measures that demonstrate the relevance of research in both the short and longer terms.

Research limitations/implications – The evidence is primarily based on the views of university senior management drawn from a relatively small number of universities leading to questions about the representativeness and generalizability of the findings. Moreover, the findings have been informed by leaders at the most senior hierarchical levels. Although consistent with the aim of the study, the views of university leaders provide only one view on our research questions.

Originality/value – The authors provide a conceptual view of research relevance from the perspective of one pivotal group – university senior management – that has been largely and surprisingly overlooked in discussions of the relevance of academic research.

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Simon Evans, Robin Means and Jane Powell

This paper report on the evaluation of a project that aimed to improve the integration of care homes with health and social care services and with the wider community.

239

Abstract

Purpose

This paper report on the evaluation of a project that aimed to improve the integration of care homes with health and social care services and with the wider community.

Design/methodology/approach

The evaluation adopted a mixed methods approach, combining quantitative performance data with semi‐structured stakeholder interviews and emergency bed use costings.

Findings

The evaluation suggests that the project made significant steps towards integrating care homes with the health and social care community and demonstrated cost savings through reduced hospital bed use.

Practical implications

Health and social care interventions aimed at upskilling care home staff can increase standards of care and quality of life for residents; they are also likely to highlight unmet needs.

Originality/value

The project demonstrated the need for better integration of health and social care services with care homes in order to improve quality of life for residents.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2011

Johan M.G. van der Dennen

In this chapter, I use the term “biopolitics” to mean evolutionarily informed political science. Politics has been characterized as “Who gets what, when, and how” (Lasswell, 1936

Abstract

In this chapter, I use the term “biopolitics” to mean evolutionarily informed political science. Politics has been characterized as “Who gets what, when, and how” (Lasswell, 1936), but rather than about material possessions, politics is understood to be about power, more specifically about collective power, especially differential group power competition, hierarchy and stratification in power distribution, and the universal struggle to enhance power, and to maintain or challenge/destroy this status quo. Politics “should be found in any system of nature in which conflicts of interest exist among cooperating organic units” (Johnson, 1995, p. 279). My main focus will be competitive intergroup relations in monkeys and apes, or as I (van der Dennen, 1995) called it “intergroup agonistic behavior” (IAB). I also briefly treat interindividual and intercoalitionary agonistic behavior when relevant.

Details

Biology and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-580-9

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