Search results

1 – 10 of 29
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Laurel A. Clyde and Jane E. Klobas

Examines changes in experience and confidence among students taking their first Internet course at university between 1994 and 2000 in a country with high Internet use…

Abstract

Examines changes in experience and confidence among students taking their first Internet course at university between 1994 and 2000 in a country with high Internet use. Time series show that the number of participants who had used the Internet before commencing university has increased so it is now rare to encounter a student with no prior experience. While almost all new students are experienced and confident users of e‐mail and the WWW, not all have used search engines, and exposure to new and advanced tools is limited. Very few have built a Web page. The first Internet course at universities in countries with high Internet penetration should develop students’ understanding of the Internet as it is used in everyday life by developing knowledge of the Internet’s history and development, advanced skills in Internet use, and the knowledge required to evaluate the potential of new Internet technologies and applications.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Mehwish Waheed, Jane E Klobas and NoorUl Ain

Examines how perceived knowledge quality influences researchers' satisfaction with academic social media (ASM) site use, perceived learning from use, and loyalty toward the site.

Abstract

Purpose

Examines how perceived knowledge quality influences researchers' satisfaction with academic social media (ASM) site use, perceived learning from use, and loyalty toward the site.

Design/methodology/approach

Built upon the theoretical grounding of the information system success framework, it was hypothesized that satisfaction, perceived learning, and loyal behavior toward an ASM site are all functions of the perceived quality of knowledge obtained. Data were collected by online survey from 348 researchers registered on ResearchGate and subjected to SmartPLS structural equation modeling, bootstrapping, and blindfolding.

Findings

The hypothesized relationships were supported. Perceived knowledge quality significantly influences researchers' satisfaction with ASM site use, and satisfaction affects perceived learning and researchers' loyalty with the ASM site.

Research limitations/implications

Identification of the relationship between perceived knowledge quality and ASM site success extends the study of ASM sites from description of usage patterns to understanding the effect of content quality on important outcomes of use.

Practical implications

ASM sites rely on the quality of knowledge contributed by their members for satisfaction, loyalty, and perceptions of value. The ongoing success of an ASM requires directed attention to quality knowledge provision.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a simplified DeLone & McLean information system success framework for studies of content quality. It also provides fresh insights into ASM site usage through a focus on the role of perceived knowledge quality in forming satisfaction, learning, and loyalty.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/10662249610152320. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/10662249610152320. When citing the article, please cite: Jane E. Klobas, (1996), “Networked information resources: electronic opportunities for users and librarians”, Internet Research, Vol. 6 Iss: 4, pp. 53 - 62.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Jane E. Klobas, Tanya J. McGill, Sedigheh Moghavvemi and Tanuosha Paramanathan

The purpose of this paper is to present brief YouTube life stories to learn about how extensive users experience YouTube use and manage (or fail to manage) their use. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present brief YouTube life stories to learn about how extensive users experience YouTube use and manage (or fail to manage) their use. It also explores the consequences of different types of extensive use.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a biographical approach was used. Nine students who used YouTube for two or more hours every day were guided to tell life stories of their introduction to YouTube, subsequent use and critical events associated with YouTube use. Thematic analysis distinguished between non-problematic, compulsive and addicted users. Three single case life stories illustrate the experiences of users in each category.

Findings

These extensive YouTube users tell similar stories of informal learning from early interaction with the platform. For some, extensive YouTube use became problematic; for others, it remained functional. Similar to other social platforms, users unable to regulate use became compulsive users and some users can become addicted. While the symptoms of YouTube addiction are similar to other online addictions, compulsive YouTube use is driven more by algorithm-generated content chaining than overt social interaction.

Originality/value

The paper introduces life stories as a way to present case studies of social media use. The distinction between extensive, but functional, and problematic YouTube use illustrates how extensive social media use is not necessarily dysfunctional. User education for self-regulation of YouTube use is recommended.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Jane E. Klobas and Laurel A. Clyde

Examines social influences on Internet use and training based primarily on the results of longitudinal research with adult Internet trainees in Iceland. The authors…

Abstract

Examines social influences on Internet use and training based primarily on the results of longitudinal research with adult Internet trainees in Iceland. The authors briefly discuss the theoretical context before outlining the research and its findings. Social influences included the effect of family and friends, employers, professional colleagues, the media, and a general sense that, increasingly, “everybody” is expected to be able to use the Internet. In this context, librarians and the managers of libraries and information services are experts who are best placed to exert their influence on attitudes to the Internet by providing recommendations, demonstrations, and training about the Internet as a source of information and knowledge.

Details

Library Management, vol. 22 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Jane E. Klobas

Many of the activities people perform with the Internet are new, and possibly could not have been conceived before the network became available. Describes innovative uses…

Abstract

Many of the activities people perform with the Internet are new, and possibly could not have been conceived before the network became available. Describes innovative uses of the Internet by staff of two Australian universities. While the Internet provides opportunities for communication among its users, it poses challenges to the computing and information systems professionals who support them. It also presents librarians with the opportunity to apply their established skills as educators, information managers, custodians, information providers and change agents in their work with Internet users.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Jane E. Klobas and Laurel A. Clyde

Do librarians feel that it is important to keep up to date with new developments in technology? What means do they use to find out about these new developments, and how…

Abstract

Do librarians feel that it is important to keep up to date with new developments in technology? What means do they use to find out about these new developments, and how effective are those means? These and related issues are considered in this article, in which the authors report on a small‐scale survey of librarians in Western Australia, carried out in 1989. The results suggest that, while the librarians have a strong belief that it is important to keep up to date with information on new technology, they generally adopt the common strategy of simply using readily‐available sources of information.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Jane E. Klobas

This paper examines factors to be considered in the management of technological change in libraries and information services. The factors include the organisational…

Abstract

This paper examines factors to be considered in the management of technological change in libraries and information services. The factors include the organisational climate or ‘environment for change’ and other factors that are specific to introduction of a new product, system or service. The author concentrates on the need for energetic, authoritative leadership; clear goals: the commitment of users, staff and management: timing; and resources. The importance of consultation, attention to political processes and communicating (or ‘marketing’) the change is stressed.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Jane E. Klobas

The purpose of this paper is to propose measures of online open course success for non-commercial institutional providers of massive open online courses (MOOCs) and other…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose measures of online open course success for non-commercial institutional providers of massive open online courses (MOOCs) and other scaleable open online courses (SOOCs).

Design/methodology/approach

The measures are derived from the characteristics of open online courses, existing knowledge about open online course providers and users and their motivations, and current practice in MOOC evaluation and data analytics.

Findings

Current practices for evaluation of open online courses are dominated by MOOC analytics which provide insights into user demographics and behaviour with some implications for evaluation of reach and course design but leaving many unknowns. Measures for evaluation of success at the institutional level can be derived from institutional goals for open online courses. Success from the point of view of teachers and technical teams involved in design, development and delivery of open online courses can be derived from team members’ expectations, resources and satisfaction as well as measures of cost and effort compared to budget and benchmarks. Users are classified as registrants (information seekers, window shoppers, samplers), downloaders and participants (starters, partial participants and full participants who are further divided into auditing, active and certificate takers); different measures are appropriate for each group.

Practical implications

Practitioners and researchers must consider a variety of levels and indicators of success to adequately evaluate open online courses. Tables in the text propose measures, methods, timing and roles.

Originality/value

This is the first published paper to take a holistic view of open online course evaluation and propose detailed measures.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Jane E. Klobas

Many of the activities people perform with the Internet are new, andpossibly could not have been conceived before the network becameavailable. Describes innovative uses of…

Abstract

Many of the activities people perform with the Internet are new, and possibly could not have been conceived before the network became available. Describes innovative uses of the Internet by staff of two Australian universities. While the Internet provides opportunities for communication among its users, it poses challenges to the computing and information systems professionals who support them. It also presents librarians with the opportunity to apply their established skills as educators, information managers, custodians, information providers, and change agents in their work with Internet users.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

1 – 10 of 29