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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Jane Davis

The purpose of this paper is to present the viewpoint that student role identity, its dimensions and salience, impact strongly on student expectations of college-based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the viewpoint that student role identity, its dimensions and salience, impact strongly on student expectations of college-based higher education (CBHE) within the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on doctoral research undertaken within the context of CBHE in the UK and is further supported through engagement with a range of pertinent literature.

Findings

The paper suggests ways in which the individually constructed student role identity may impact on the expectations of the experience of CBHE. In so doing, the paper highlights the way in which expectations of higher education recursively influence, and are influenced by, perceptions and actions played out from within the student role.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical research, from which the paper draws its theme, was undertaken in one large institution. The author recognises that a wider, longitudinal study would be beneficial in recognition of the diversity of provision in the CBHE sector.

Practical implications

The paper proposes that greater awareness of the way in which students construct and moderate their perceptions and understandings of studenthood would be beneficial to a range of strategic considerations, such as promotional information, partnership activity, peer relations and the nature of pedagogies and learning architectures.

Social implications

The paper foregrounds the political remit of CBHE as a progression route for “non-traditional” students, and considers the varied understandings of the meaning of the student role adopted by students attending colleges. Engagement with issues of multiple roles, identity salience and variable role porosity highlights social and pyschosocial issues faced by many such students.

Originality/value

The paper considers role identity in the context of Kurt Lewin’s conceptualisation of life space and uses this framework to highlight issues that may face students and colleges in raising awareness of student expectations. It challenges the homogenous conceptualisation of the term “students” through consideration of the psychic state at a given moment in time.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Aisling Jane Davis and Patricia Mc Clure

Discharge planning home visits (DPHVs) are a routine part of occupational therapy clinical practice. However, there is a dearth of evidence to support or refute their…

Abstract

Purpose

Discharge planning home visits (DPHVs) are a routine part of occupational therapy clinical practice. However, there is a dearth of evidence to support or refute their efficacy and limited policies or standards to guide clinical practice. This study aims to investigate current clinical practice during home visits and the value that occupational therapists’ attribute to home visits within an Irish context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was carried out by using a survey questionnaire (postal and electronic options). The study population comprised occupational therapists across 52 sites including acute, rehabilitation and convalescence settings within the Republic of Ireland. In total, 122 occupational therapists that completed the survey questionnaire were recruited for the study.

Findings

Quantitative data identified time spent per visit, departmental size, hospital size, number of visits and report writing times. Information was gathered regarding clinical areas assessed during visits in a Likert scale format. Qualitative data identified benefits, risks, recommendations to improve home visit practice and clinical criteria for home visits. Findings conclude that DPHVs are routinely carried out by occupational therapists and that there is consistency in clinical practice within an Irish setting. Occupational therapists value home visits as clinical assessments and have identified risks during practice, benefits of visits and ways to improve practice.

Originality/value

This study has provided a reflection of clinical practice in the Republic of Ireland. It is the only study of its kind in an Irish setting, and it could be used as a knowledge base regarding current practice on DPHV and occupational therapists’ clinical reasoning regarding home visits. The information gathered in this study could influence policies regarding DPHV and could serve as a comparison to standardise practice and justify the need for DPHV.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

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Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Ivanka Stricevic

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 65 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Gavin Moodie and Leesa Wheelahan

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

In the last issue of VINE we had a look at the serials control package — ISIS from Blackwell's. As a contrast we now take a look at a bespoke serials check‐in system…

Abstract

In the last issue of VINE we had a look at the serials control package — ISIS from Blackwell's. As a contrast we now take a look at a bespoke serials check‐in system developed at The British Library Document Supply Centre (BLDSC) at Boston Spa. The BLDSC has somewhat unique requirements from a serials check‐in system. The library currently subscribes to 56,000 journal titles and receives approximately 350,000 issues each year arriving at a rate of 1,500 issues per day. These are handled in the Accessions Department by a team of 8 who aim to have the issues checked in fast enough to be available on the shelves by 4.30pm each day. To help to achieve this aim SACHET (Serials Accessions CHEck‐in of Titles) was devised and developed in‐house by the BLDSC Computing Department.

Details

VINE, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Ting Luo, Xiaolong Xue, Yongtao Tan, Yuna Wang and Yuanxin Zhang

This paper aimed to introduce a systematic body of knowledge via a scientometric review, guiding the sustainable transition from conventional construction to prefabricated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aimed to introduce a systematic body of knowledge via a scientometric review, guiding the sustainable transition from conventional construction to prefabricated construction. The construction industry currently faces a challenge to balance sustainable development and the construction of new buildings. In this context, one of the most recent debates is prefabricated construction. As an emerging construction approach, although existing knowledge makes contributions to the implementation of prefabricated construction, there is a lack of a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the critical knowledge themes and gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the scientometric analysis to review the state-of-the-art knowledge of prefabricated construction. It retrieved data from the Web of Science core collection database. CiteSpace software was used to conduct the analysis and visualization; three analysis methods identify the knowledge hotspots, knowledge domains and knowledge topics. Finally, according to integrating the hidden connections among results, a body of knowledge for prefabricated construction application can be inferred.

Findings

The results show that 120 knowledge hotspots, five critical knowledge domains and five prominent knowledge topics are vital for promoting implementation of prefabricated construction. Based on the afore analysis, a body of knowledge for prefabricated construction that can systematically cover a broad knowledge of prefabricated construction-related research and activities are integrated and proposed in this paper.

Originality/value

Body of knowledge systematically covers a broad knowledge of prefabricated construction applications and is vital to guide researchers and practitioners to conduct related research and activities, thereby promoting the sustainable transition to prefabricated construction implementation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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