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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Jane Boyd Thomas, Ginger A. Woodward and David Herr

The next generation of shoppers is hitting the stores, and forward‐thinking retailers are following their every move. For retailers who target the teen market, developing…

Abstract

The next generation of shoppers is hitting the stores, and forward‐thinking retailers are following their every move. For retailers who target the teen market, developing strategies aimed at reaching this market are complex. This study was conducted for a large south‐eastern US department store chain which was interested in learning more about the purchasing behaviours of teenagers. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between jean purchase criteria, the type of store selected when purchasing a pair of jeans and teenagers’ purchasing behaviours. The sample consisted of teenagers aged 14 to 18 years old who were enrolled in a required economics class in four representative high schools. Results indicated that jean purchase criteria and type of store impact on both information‐seeking behaviours and price‐conscious purchasing behaviours among teenagers. For the information seeker, price, wash and brand were statistically significant and influenced the degree of information‐seeking behaviour. The cost‐conscious teenager was influenced by price, brand and quality. In addition, males and African Americans placed a greater importance on the store where purchases were made than did females and whites, respectively. Opportunities exist for all types of stores which are interested in attracting the teen market. Retailers need to understand where teenagers shop and the criteria that they use for selecting a store. Additional research needs to be conducted to investigate the cross‐shopping behaviours of teenagers and the store selection criteria they use.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Emma Jane Riddle, David A. Bradbard, Jane Boyd Thomas and Doris H. Kincade

In response to international competition and pressure from retailers, US apparel manufacturers and their suppliers initiated the Quick Response (QR) program. QR seeks to…

Abstract

In response to international competition and pressure from retailers, US apparel manufacturers and their suppliers initiated the Quick Response (QR) program. QR seeks to provide retailers with the exact stock‐keeping units (SKUs) which consumers demand and to deliver these SKUs quickly. An effective QR program requires rapid transmission of data throughout the value chain, from the retailer back to apparel manufacturers, fabric producers and fibre manufacturers. Therefore, electronic data interchange (EDI) is a key component of QR and should be tightly linked with other information systems at each level of the value chain. This research is an empirical study of the degree to which EDI has been implemented by US apparel manufacturers and the extent to which EDI is integrated with other information systems. It was found that apparel manufacturers use EDI to establish tight linkages with their customers, the retailers. Manufacturers are less likely to increase their own efficiencies by linking EDI with internal information systems or by establishing EDI linkages with suppliers. The lack of supplier linkages may reduce manufacturers' ability to replenish retail inventories quickly, which is the primary objective of QR.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Dorothy E. Wu, Jane Boyd Thomas, Marguerite Moore and Kate Carroll

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumers’ motivations to participate in voluntary simplicity in the current market environment.

1897

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumers’ motivations to participate in voluntary simplicity in the current market environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using established qualitative research methods, 834 individual autobiographies and blog entries from The Great American Apparel Diet (GAAD) are examined.

Findings

Six general categories of internal and external motivations to engage in voluntary simplicity are identified. Findings expand marketers’ understanding of voluntary simplicity and the role of virtual communities inspiring behavior in the contemporary marketplace.

Originality/value

This research is unique because it explores personal information shared in the blog entries of participants in the GAAD.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Jane Boyd Thomas and Cara Lee Okleshen Peters

One of the fastest growing segments of the American adult population is adults over 65‐years old. This group is refereed to as “silver seniors.” Understanding the silver…

3454

Abstract

Purpose

One of the fastest growing segments of the American adult population is adults over 65‐years old. This group is refereed to as “silver seniors.” Understanding the silver citizen market requires an in‐depth knowledge of seniors' attitudes and lifestyles. The purpose of this paper is to present an in‐depth view of the senior woman's self‐concept, lifestyle, and apparel‐related preferences and shopping behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using findings from an extensive review of literature and in‐depth interviews with 20 women over age 65, this exploratory research provides insight into the impact of self‐concept, lifestyles, and fashion behaviors on apparel purchase decisions. The qualitative approach used for data collection and analysis provides rich insight into the behaviors and apparel needs of “silver seniors.” The tripartite self‐concept is explored as it relates to fashion attitudes and behaviors.

Findings

Findings from this paper indicate that women over 65 are still interested in fashion and that looking fashionable for themselves and others is important. Insights into the specific unmet apparel and retail needs of senior adult women are explored. Findings indicate that senior adult women continue to remain physically and socially active and have need for a variety of garments. Recommendations for apparel manufacturers and retailers targeting this lucrative segment are presented.

Originality/value

This paper is original to the retailing and consumer behavior literature. One of the benefits of this exploratory study is that it provided the authors with an opportunity to examine, in theory and practice, an overlooked yet growing segment of apparel consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Jane Boyd Thomas, Cara Okleshen Peters and Holly Tolson

Virtual communities are increasing in popularity and changing the way apparel fashion information is learned and shared by consumers. According to Agins, consumers, as…

5472

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual communities are increasing in popularity and changing the way apparel fashion information is learned and shared by consumers. According to Agins, consumers, as opposed to élite designers, are now dictating fashion trends and pinpointing the ideal places of distribution. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the fashion‐related discussion which is taking place on perhaps the best known of these communities, MySpace.com. The three research questions driving this study include: “What are consumers saying about fashion within this particular virtual community?”; “What commonalities exist among the plethora of fashion‐related information available in this context?”; and “What kinds of insights can marketers draw from the categories of fashion‐related information being presented in MySpace.com?”

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis was selected as the method for investigation. Within the forum Fashion and Style, the subgroup FashionLOVERS was selected for investigation because it represented a general discussion of fashion. The first 200 forum topical areas with five or more posts were selected for analysis. A total of 6,623 individual posts were examined and each of the three authors independently reviewed the posts noting the general topical categories of content. Interrater reliability for the coders was computed.

Findings

Eight recurring categories of fashion related information were identified in the study. The four most popular discussion categories were personal style, brands and designers, tips and advice, and retailers. The prevalence of these four topics suggests that consumer driven marketing is a growing and influential component of fashion marketing.

Research limitations/implications

This study makes an important contribution to the study of virtual communities. Results provide insight into the complex, multi‐layered, interactive fashion‐related communication that occurs within virtual communities.

Practical implications

Fashion marketers and retailers are encountering an untapped resource with these virtual communities. Findings highlight the power of consumers in virtual communities and suggest a need for fashion marketers and retailers to closely monitor communication within virtual communities.

Originality/value

This research is particularly valuable because it provides insight into the popular virtual community, MySpace.com. Detailed investigation into types of fashion information that are shared with community members is presented and discussed.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Jane Boyd Thomas and Cara Peters

The purpose of the present study is to explore the collective consumption rituals associated with Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, and one of the largest shopping…

8704

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to explore the collective consumption rituals associated with Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, and one of the largest shopping days in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design for this study followed the approach of psychological phenomenological interviewing. Over a two‐year period, the authors, along with trained research assistants, conducted interviews with experienced female Black Friday shoppers.

Findings

Qualitative data from 38 interviews indicated that Black Friday shopping activities constitute a collective consumption ritual that is practiced and shared by multiple generations of female family members and close friends. Four themes emerged from the data: familial bonding, strategic planning, the great race, and mission accomplished. The themes coalesced around a military metaphor.

Practical implications

The findings of this study indicate that Black Friday shoppers plan for the ritual by examining advertisements and strategically mapping out their plans for the day. Recommendations for retailers are presented.

Originality/value

This exploratory investigation of Black Friday as a consumption ritual offers new insight into the planning and shopping associated with this well‐known American pseudo‐holiday. Findings also extend theory and research on collective consumption rituals.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Jane Boyd Thomas and Cara Lee Okleshen Peters

A dynamic retailing format is emerging in metropolitan cities across the USA: the underground mall (UGM). The UGM is a place of trade where a cluster of socially networked…

2283

Abstract

Purpose

A dynamic retailing format is emerging in metropolitan cities across the USA: the underground mall (UGM). The UGM is a place of trade where a cluster of socially networked buyers (i.e. potential customers) and sellers (i.e. retailers) meet face‐to‐face in a private setting (i.e. in the seller's garage or in a neighborhood clubhouse) for the purpose of trade. This study seeks to detail how this unique retailing format operates and examines factors influencing consumption within this gray market.

Design/methodology/approach

Two theories were utilized in developing a framework for data collection: gray markets and market embeddedness. Data were collected via in‐depth interviews with 16 UGM shoppers. The data were analyzed and interpreted according to the protocol for phenomenology.

Findings

A combination of diverse retailing and socialization benefits drives the gray market of the UGM. Retailing benefits include a wide variety of vendors and products, unique items, convenience, a personalized shopping experience, and a comfortable shopping context. Socialization benefits include strengthening interpersonal relationships and building connections within one's community.

Research limitations/implications

This study makes an important contribution to the gray marketing literature. The findings illustrate that a combination of diverse retailing and socialization benefits, not price, drives this particular gray market.

Originality/value

This research is original to the gray market, market embeddedness, and retailing literatures within the field of marketing. The findings of this study suggest that consumer motives for shopping in the gray market of the UGM are more hedonic than utilitarian in nature.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Jenna Drenten, Cara Okleshen Peters and Jane Boyd Thomas

The purpose of this study is to examine the consumer socialization of preschool age children in a peer‐to‐peer context as they participate in dramatic play in a grocery…

2177

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the consumer socialization of preschool age children in a peer‐to‐peer context as they participate in dramatic play in a grocery store setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a case study approach as outlined by Yin. A preschool located within a major metropolitan area in the Southeastern USA was selected for investigation. Located within each of the three classrooms was a grocery store learning center. This learning center provided children the opportunity to engage in dramatic play while enacting grocery shopping scripts. A total of 55 children between the ages of three‐ and six‐years old were observed over a six‐week period. Observations were recorded via field notes and transcribed into an electronic data file. Emergent themes were compared with theoretical propositions, fleshing out an overall interpretation and description of the case context.

Findings

Findings indicate that even very young children (ages three to six years) are able to successfully adopt and utilize adult shopping scripts within the grocery store shopping context. The children followed a common sequence of behaviors that mimicked adult shopping patterns. Furthermore, the children demonstrated peer‐to‐peer consumer socialization strategies, directing each other on how to perform appropriate shopping scripts.

Originality/value

This study differs from previous research in that the data reveal that preschool age children do in fact exhibit peer‐to‐peer influence while enacting shopping scripts. Although research has examined children as consumers, no researchers have used dramatic play to study young children in a grocery store setting. The rich content obtained from observing children in dramatic play in a grocery store learning center is unique to the marketing literature and provides a better understanding of the consumer socialization of young children.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Neil Towers

442

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

121

Abstract

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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