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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra, Betsy Rush Charles and Can Uslay

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Philip M. Osano, Mohammed Y. Said, Jan de Leeuw, Stephen S. Moiko, Dickson Ole Kaelo, Sarah Schomers, Regina Birner and Joseph O. Ogutu

The purpose of this paper is to assess the potential for pastoral communities inhabiting Kenyan Masailand to adapt to climate change using conservancies and payments for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the potential for pastoral communities inhabiting Kenyan Masailand to adapt to climate change using conservancies and payments for ecosystem services.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple methods and data sources were used, comprising: a socio‐economic survey of 295 households; informal interviews with pastoralists, conservancy managers, and tourism investors; focus group discussions; a stakeholder workshop. Monthly rainfall data was used to analyse drought frequency and intensity. A framework of the interactions between pastoralists' drought coping and risk mitigation strategies and the conservancy effects was developed, and used to qualitatively assess some interactions across the three study sites. Changes in household livestock holdings and sources of cash income are calculated in relation to the 2008‐09 drought.

Findings

The frequency and intensity of droughts are increasing but are localised across the three study sites. The proportion of households with per capita livestock holdings below the 4.5 TLU poverty vulnerability threshold increased by 34 per cent in Kitengela and 5 per cent in the Mara site, mainly due to the drought in 2008‐2009. Payment for ecosystem services was found to buffer households from fluctuating livestock income, but also generates synergies and/or trade‐offs depending on land use restrictions.

Originality/value

The contribution of conservancies to drought coping and risk mitigation strategies of pastoralists is analyzed as a basis for evaluating the potential for ecosystem‐based adaptation.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Andrew Taylor and Margaret Taylor

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2003

John Michael Montias

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Economics of Art and Culture Invited Papers at the 12th International Conference of the Association of Cultural Economics International
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-995-6

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2016

Jan van Helden and Christoph Reichard

An examination of the commonalities and differences between performance management practices in the public and private sector.

Abstract

Purpose

An examination of the commonalities and differences between performance management practices in the public and private sector.

Methodology/approach

A literature review of 100 publications in international academic journals over the last 20 years.

Findings

The chapter develops a framework which links the dimensions of the public/private-distinction (ownership, funding, control and type of goals) to the design and use of performance management systems (PMS). This framework subsequently informs a literature review, which can be summarised as follows: Multi-dimensionality of the PMS is core in both public and private sector organisations, but quite many private sector papers point to a financial focus at the top of the PMS, while public sector organisations show a broad variety of performance indicators, including those on societally relevant goals. In addition, a link between the PMS and strategies can be found in the public and the private sector, but the match between different strategies and PMS design is more elaborated in the private sector. These findings are largely in accordance with our expectations. The review also finds support for the assumption that performance information in public sector organisations is primarily used for external accountability reasons, while internal managerial control is the main purpose in private firms. The use of performance information is quite intensive and mostly functional in both sectors, which does not meet our expectations. Overall, the differences between performance management practices in the public and private sector are less stringent than expected.

Research limitations

Due to limited evidence about the importance of performance-related pay systems and no evidence about targeting in both sectors, a more focused literature review on these issues would be desirable.

Practical implications

Mutual learning between both sectors, for example the public sector can learn from the private sector on how to link strategy to the PMS and the private sector can learn from the public sector about serving a multitude of stakeholders in the PMS.

Originality/value

A comprehensive review of performance management practices in the public and private sector.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Contemporary Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-915-2

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Transport Survey Quality and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044096-5

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Jaakko Tätilä, Pekka Helkiö and Jan Holmström

The intended function of performance measurement is to support the effective management of an organisation and the improvement of organisational performance. However, how…

Abstract

Purpose

The intended function of performance measurement is to support the effective management of an organisation and the improvement of organisational performance. However, how performance measurement should be used operationally to support the achievement of improved performance is not self-evident. The purpose of this paper is to examine the operational use of performance measurement in practice and to describe how different use practices contribute to improved performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an exploratory single case study in a maintenance process. Data were collected using a mixed methods approach that encompassed qualitative meetings and interviews (identification of usage practices) followed by a quantitative survey (elaboration of usage practices and their performance effects).

Findings

Three usage practices are relevant: Inspect and Improve, Motivate, and Decision Making. Improved performance is best achieved through motivational and supportive improvement use. Furthermore, performance measurement systems must be designed properly to establish their use.

Research limitations/implications

Being based on a single-case study, the identified usage practices may be limited to field service organisations or other organisations with similar organisational structures. The findings suggest opportunities for further research linking operational performance measurement system use and the body of knowledge on the design and purpose of performance measurement in maintenance processes.

Practical implications

A performance measurement system can be used as a motivational improvement tool in operational level leadership. Upper level management must support its use by designing an understandable and applicable system.

Originality/value

This paper identifies specific usage practices that contribute to improved performance, thereby providing a more detailed view than the usage categories found in the extant literature. The focus is on operational, rather than strategic, level management.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Emmelie Gustafsson, Patrik Jonsson and Jan Holmström

This paper investigate how fit uncertainty impacts product return costs in online retailing and how digital product fitting, a pre-sales fitting practice, can reduce fit…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigate how fit uncertainty impacts product return costs in online retailing and how digital product fitting, a pre-sales fitting practice, can reduce fit uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes the current performance of a retailer's e-commerce and return operations by estimating costs generated by product returns, including product handling costs, tied-up capital, inventory holding costs, transportation costs, and order-picking costs. The estimated costs were built on 2,229 return transactions from a Scandinavian fashion footwear retailer. A digital product fitting technology was tested with the retailer’s products and resulted in estimations on how such technology could affect product returns.

Findings

The cost of a return is approximately 17% of the prime cost. The major cost elements are product handling costs and transportation costs, which together amount to 72% of the total costs. If well calibrated, the fitting technology can cut fit-related return costs by up to 80%. The findings show how customers reacted to the fitting technology: it was unable to verify fit every time, but it serves as a useful and effective support tool for customers when placing orders.

Research limitations/implications

Virtual fit verification using digital product fitting is key to retailers to reduce fit-related returns. Digital product fitting using three-dimensional scanning is more appropriate for some products, but it is unsuitable for products that are difficult to measure and scan.

Originality/value

The paper contributes an empirical estimate of retail supply chain costs associated with fit uncertainty, as well as theoretical understanding of the role of pre-sales fit verification in avoiding product returns.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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