Search results

1 – 10 of 531
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

David C. Gilbert, Jan Powell‐Perry and Sianandar Widijoso

Offers a study of the current use of the Internet, as a marketing tool, by the hotel industry. Such a study is timely given that the growth rate of the World Wide Web (WWW…

Abstract

Offers a study of the current use of the Internet, as a marketing tool, by the hotel industry. Such a study is timely given that the growth rate of the World Wide Web (WWW or the “Web”) is estimated at about 50 per cent per month, with the number of sites doubling every 53 days. Seeks to present an argument for the application of the relationship marketing (RM) model as a framework for the development of hotel Web sites. The authors believe that a successful Web presence depends upon more than just the technology used and the “look and feel” of the site. Hotels need a framework which can bridge the gap between simply connecting to the Web and harnessing its power for competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

George Lueddeke

Describes how an institution in Canada attempted to broaden staff understanding of two telecommunications media, videoteleconferencing and telecourse delivery, by…

Abstract

Describes how an institution in Canada attempted to broaden staff understanding of two telecommunications media, videoteleconferencing and telecourse delivery, by establishing provisional systems or opportunities to trial new ideas based on the temporary educational systems (TES) typology, suggested by Bergquist (1992), and the Concerns‐Based Adoption model (CBAM), following Hall and Hord (1987). Referencing the case examples, contemporary literature and in the light of the UK National (Dearing) Committee of Inquiry into Higher Education’s report (1997), deduces implications for implementing future projects and identifies factors to consider in the development of communications and information technology (C&IT) strategies for learning and teaching.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1964

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a…

Abstract

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a manufacturing community able to provide a standard of living second to that of the United States. (At the present time only 10.8 per cent of Canadians live on farms according to the 1961 census.) Natural resources, such as timber, wheat and mining, continue to play, however, an important role in the life of the nation. As in most developing and pioneer countries, learning has had to assume a secondary role compared with other enterprises and activities. This is gradually beginning to change as more people continue in school and the percentage of individuals attending university increases. Established organizations, like the National Film Board and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, catering to mass culture, have been strengthened and enlarged and new establishments, like the Canada Council and the Stratford Shakespearean Festival, of narrower function and appeal, have been set up. The Library movement, not the least of learning agencies, is gaining strength every day. In this paper some of the interesting new developments of the last ten years in the latter field will be discussed. Of necessity, much is abbreviated; a lot is ignored. Data selected has been based on the most recent sources; hence the variety in dates.

Details

New Library World, vol. 65 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1953

The Presidential Address to the Liverpool Engineering Society by Mr. Farthing (the salient points of which are reproduced in this issue) has particular bearing upon…

Abstract

The Presidential Address to the Liverpool Engineering Society by Mr. Farthing (the salient points of which are reproduced in this issue) has particular bearing upon lubrication and especially on young lubrication engineers. Mr. Farthing stressed the very wide field open to young engineers and the difficulties associated with training in order to cover as wide a field as may be necessary. It is usually so important to gain a wide knowledge before one can specialise and this is certainly the case with lubrication engineers. One cannot begin to fully appreciate the intricacies of a lubrication system with all its accessory components lubricating and guarding, for example, a large motive power plant or rolling mill, until one has more than a mere working knowledge of the plant itself, the duties it must perform, how it performs them and the snags that arise which might be overcome by correct lubrication. In view of the fact that lubrication systems are just as important in a textile mill as in a power station or a large brick works, the almost impossible‐to‐achieve‐range of knowledge that would simplify the work of a lubrication engineer is very obvious. Fortunately, lubricating principles apply to most cases and knowing how to apply one's knowledge from basic principles is the key to success in this difficult profession.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 5 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 January 2020

Martin Rudnick, Jan Riezebos, Daryl John Powell and Annika Hauptvogel

A lean approach is frequently applied in the primary processes of a company, but less in after-sales service. Servitization leads to a change from pure product providers…

Abstract

Purpose

A lean approach is frequently applied in the primary processes of a company, but less in after-sales service. Servitization leads to a change from pure product providers to integrated product-service systems (PSS) providers. The after-sales services may benefit from a lean approach to effectively integrate usage data of the installed product base. This paper aims to develop a lean servitization canvas to open-up possibilities for additional revenue streams for organizations in the after-sales market.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops and proposes the use of a lean servitization canvas for effective after-sales services by drawing on insights from two industrial cases where physical goods are produced and serviced. Both cases are within the train maintenance and rail infrastructure sector in Central Europe. Based primarily on a literature review, a lean servitization canvas has been developed and further validated in the case studies.

Findings

The paper shows how value can be achieved for providers of integrated PSS by adopting the lean servitization canvas.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses on industrial services for high-capital goods in the rail and infrastructure sectors. This can be seen as a limitation of the research, as the lean servitization canvas has not yet been tested in other sectors.

Practical implications

For companies, the use of a lean approach to servitization integrates primary processes and after-sales services and offers new opportunities to develop business.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into how the current product range and customer base of a company may be included in an after-sales business model that benefits from a lean approach.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Susan L. Adkins

As CD‐ROM becomes more and more a standard reference and technicalsupport tool in all types of libraries, the annual review of thistechnology published in Computers in

Abstract

As CD‐ROM becomes more and more a standard reference and technical support tool in all types of libraries, the annual review of this technology published in Computers in Libraries magazine increases in size and scope. This year, author Susan L. Adkins has prepared this exceptionally useful bibliography which she has cross‐referenced with a subject index.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 March 2021

Bokolo Anthony Jnr.

The aim of this study is to develop a model grounded by the institutional theory to investigate blended learning (BL) implementation among faculty members in higher…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to develop a model grounded by the institutional theory to investigate blended learning (BL) implementation among faculty members in higher education and further validate the model.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative methodology was employed, and data were gathered through questionnaires among 188 e-learning directors, managers and coordinators at faculty/department in institutions, which implement BL.

Findings

Findings reveal that BL implementation by faculty members is significantly influenced by coercive, normative and mimetic pressures. Findings from this study also identified institutional initiatives that influence BL implementation. Accordingly, findings from this study provide insights into the institutional theory perspective toward BL. The findings support higher education to plan and initiate BL policies.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from faculty members in universities, colleges and polytechnics only. Besides, this research is one of the limited studies that explore BL deployment from the lens of faculty members.

Practical implications

This research contributes to the existing literature on the institutional theory and BL by presenting significant initiatives as practical suggestions for educationalist and policymakers. Therefore, this study provides practical implications to better understand BL initiatives by providing insights into how institutions can improve faculty members' satisfaction levels, improving course management, enriching teaching quality and enhancing learning content.

Social implications

The findings provided in this study can be employed to design practices, policies and a culture that support continuance use of BL systems among faculty members to achieve an effective institutional outcome.

Originality/value

This study contributes to existing BL adoption and develops a model to examine faculty member implementation of BL approach. This research has several suggestions for higher education in terms of practice to support adoption of BL. The developed model can also be employed by academics, administration and institutions to determine success initiatives for achieving an appropriate change in adopting BL in their institutions.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Among the top management issues covered in this section are: leadership to promote change; issues of corporate culture; effective international strategy; environmental…

Abstract

Among the top management issues covered in this section are: leadership to promote change; issues of corporate culture; effective international strategy; environmental leadership; investment in Eastern Europe; and developing “world‐class” manufacturing strategy.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 93 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Jan Fülscher and Stephen G. Powell

Many tools are in use for representing and analyzing business processes, but little information is available on how these tools are used in practice by process design…

Abstract

Many tools are in use for representing and analyzing business processes, but little information is available on how these tools are used in practice by process design teams. This paper analyzes one process mapping workshop in detail. Over three days, two facilitators and five representatives of the organization and business functions redesigned the core auto insurance business at a mid‐size Swiss insurance company. The mapping tool used during the session was IDEF0. The purpose of this paper is to share our experiences in using IDEF0 in the workshop setting. In addition to a narrative description of the workshop, we offer our observations on how such workshops can be conducted effectively and on the strengths and weaknesses of IDEF0 in this context. The final business process map did not emerge from a logical, linear development process. Rather, the workshop was characterized by constant refinement and development of an existing structure, punctuated by an occasional radical idea that forced the group to throw out the current process and start over. The hierarchical approach of IDEF0 proved critical in keeping the group focused on its task of abstracting the essence of the process itself from the details of current practice. The mapping tool proved to be less convenient for representing a sequence of events in time, multiple cases, and conditional flows of work.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Alhashmi Aboubaker Lasyoud, Jim Haslam and Robin Roslender

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the change in management accounting and control systems (MACSs) within two large public manufacturing companies in Libya…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the change in management accounting and control systems (MACSs) within two large public manufacturing companies in Libya so-called Trucks and Buses Company (TBC) and National Trailers Company (NTC).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on semi-structured interviews, an analysis of documents and observations. It draws on New Institutional Sociology (NIS) perspective (DiMaggio and Powell’s 1983) as theoretical framework to provide explanations regarding how the MACS in the two companies were shaped by various factors.

Findings

The main factors identified in shaping the operations of the MACS were the need to comply with the political pressures, the Libyan Government’s laws and regulations, the instructions imposed by the management committee in both companies, leading organizations’ pressures (ISO), customer satisfaction (coercive isomorphism), the influence of professional associations (normative isomorphism) and the need to imitate efficient organizations in order to be more legitimate and successful (mimetic isomorphism).

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the study have implications for understanding the operations of MACS in developing countries. Future research could focus on alternative theoretical perspectives for the investigation of the process of change in MACS such as structuration theory, agency theory and actor-network theory.

Originality/value

The proposed theoretical framework provides insights into the process of change by focusing on the interplay between the institutional forces, market forces and intra – organizational power relationships to overcome the criticism of NIS that it downplays the role of market forces and intra – organizational power relations.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

1 – 10 of 531