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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Jan P. Herring

Consider this scenario: A company's vice president for R&D had just given an exciting talk on what the firm believed would be the next major technological innovation in…

Abstract

Consider this scenario: A company's vice president for R&D had just given an exciting talk on what the firm believed would be the next major technological innovation in its business—one that would establish the company as the industry's technological leader and lay the ground‐work for a marketing plan to introduce a new system based on that technology next year. But during a Q&A session, a manager from the Far East commented that his firm had also investigated such an approach and had found that the technology could be produced.

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Jan P. Herring

Business leaders in Japan, Western Europe, and Latin America believe that the chief executives who lead their companies into the twenty‐first century will have to be…

Abstract

Business leaders in Japan, Western Europe, and Latin America believe that the chief executives who lead their companies into the twenty‐first century will have to be fluent in several languages, have extensive international business experience, and will have to cope with an increasing level of international competition. The Japanese leaders considered foreign competition as the primary threat—hence, their emphasis on the importance of language skills and global experience.

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Jan P. Herring

Business intelligence (BI) activities have increased significantly in the US over the past five years—but mainly at the practitioner's level. For various reasons, senior…

Abstract

Business intelligence (BI) activities have increased significantly in the US over the past five years—but mainly at the practitioner's level. For various reasons, senior managers in US companies have not adopted intelligence as a strategic management discipline. As a direct result, the use and effectiveness of BI operations in US firms remain questionable. Until senior executives become more interested and involved in the use of BI, the competitiveness of US companies will be limited by their inability to understand and outthink global competitors.

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Jan P. Herring

To compete more effectively with global challengers, U.S. companies must begin to develop corporate intelligence systems.

Abstract

To compete more effectively with global challengers, U.S. companies must begin to develop corporate intelligence systems.

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Jan P. Herring

Successful business strategies are inherently dependent on the skills of the corporate strategist and the company management team's ability to implement the strategies…

Abstract

Successful business strategies are inherently dependent on the skills of the corporate strategist and the company management team's ability to implement the strategies. However, like the chef who is creating the epicurean meal, the strategist is also dependent on the ingredients that he has to work with—in essence, his strategy can be no better than the information from which it is derived. The more comprehensive and prescient that information, the more likely the strategy is to be successful.

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1905

Referring to the question of the adulteration of brandy with silent spirit, the Standard recently observed that the question of obtaining, by legislation or otherwise, an…

Abstract

Referring to the question of the adulteration of brandy with silent spirit, the Standard recently observed that the question of obtaining, by legislation or otherwise, an improvement in the present system of public control over the purity of articles of food and drink has become one of great and even national importance. Many of the grosser kinds of adulteration, against which the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts were originally directed, are of far less frequent occurrence, but in their place has arisen a great variety of more subtle forms of adulteration, frequently very harmful, and always objectionable on account of the misrepresentation that the sophisticated article is the genuine product which the purchaser has asked for and has a right to expect. With adulteration of this kind the local authorities, whose business it is to enforce the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts, are often unable to deal satisfactorily, and this fact has been insisted upon by many scientific authorities who have interested themselves in the subject. The position of affairs with regard to spirits typifies the difficulty which constantly arises in connection with a large variety of articles of food and drink of both home and foreign manufacture. It is obvious that when cases relating to the additions of “preservative” chemicals to milk and butter, of glucose to marmalade, or the proportion of “esters” in a brandy, come before different magistrates, supported by a mass of conflicting evidence on both sides, the justices cannot be expected to come to consistent or satisfactory conclusions. Government policy in the matter seems so far to have been confined to appointing a series of committees or commissions, and afterwards doing nothing, or next to nothing, with their reports.

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British Food Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Michael Schandorf

Abstract

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Communication as Gesture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-515-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1964

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a…

Abstract

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a manufacturing community able to provide a standard of living second to that of the United States. (At the present time only 10.8 per cent of Canadians live on farms according to the 1961 census.) Natural resources, such as timber, wheat and mining, continue to play, however, an important role in the life of the nation. As in most developing and pioneer countries, learning has had to assume a secondary role compared with other enterprises and activities. This is gradually beginning to change as more people continue in school and the percentage of individuals attending university increases. Established organizations, like the National Film Board and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, catering to mass culture, have been strengthened and enlarged and new establishments, like the Canada Council and the Stratford Shakespearean Festival, of narrower function and appeal, have been set up. The Library movement, not the least of learning agencies, is gaining strength every day. In this paper some of the interesting new developments of the last ten years in the latter field will be discussed. Of necessity, much is abbreviated; a lot is ignored. Data selected has been based on the most recent sources; hence the variety in dates.

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New Library World, vol. 65 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1992

The Great Benchmarking Scam? Time was, in management circles, that the term “benchmarking” would induce none‐too‐disguised yawns in recognition of it “being something to…

Abstract

The Great Benchmarking Scam? Time was, in management circles, that the term “benchmarking” would induce none‐too‐disguised yawns in recognition of it “being something to do with computers or job evaluation”. Not today; those yawns have been replaced with the excited management‐blabber of a new fad. You can benchmark anything these days; I encountered recently a guide to benchmarking employee attitudes.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 10 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Carsten Stage and Tina Thode Hougaard

Abstract

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The Language of Illness and Death on Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-479-8

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