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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Jan Nichols

Following the Library induction/orientation process at theUniversity of the West of England, Bristol in the autumn term of 1990,it was recognized on both educational and…

Abstract

Following the Library induction/orientation process at the University of the West of England, Bristol in the autumn term of 1990, it was recognized on both educational and practical grounds that re‐appraisal was necessary. The result of this re‐appraisal was the development of a workbook with a flexible format, enabling it to be used with students from each of the eight faculties. The workbook programme was evaluated quantitatively (by questionnaire) and qualitatively (by meetings) and a number of recommendations made. Students expressed how much they had benefited by working together in small groups. It was decided to foster this approach of collaborative enquiry in the design of a series of shorter guides, workbooks and worksheets which were used by the Bristol Business School librarian for the induction/orientation programme in the autumn of 1992. The alternative programmes were evaluated qualitatively from student groups and from enquiries desk staff, with extremely positive results from both groups.

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Library Review, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Cathy Carpmael, Steve Morgan and Jan Nichols

Library orientation in Bristol Polytechnic was reappraised and thedecision taken to develop a workbook as a potential alternative to thelibrary induction tour and evaluate…

Abstract

Library orientation in Bristol Polytechnic was reappraised and the decision taken to develop a workbook as a potential alternative to the library induction tour and evaluate its effectiveness. Describes the project and the workbook. Outlines its implementation and evaluation and analyses the educational benefits of the workbook approach.

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Library Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Jan Nichols

Librarians, their academic colleagues, and students face manychallenges as a result of the increase in student numbers and the moveto student‐centred learning. At Bristol…

Abstract

Librarians, their academic colleagues, and students face many challenges as a result of the increase in student numbers and the move to student‐centred learning. At Bristol Business School (BBS), these were addressed by a number of staff development projects. Project 6 researched the lecturer, the student and change. The project group comprised members with varied backgrounds including the BBS subject librarian. The research took the form of focus group discussions with first‐year undergraduate business studies students. The results suggested that the most important issue for them is leaving home; they developed coping strategies to deal with overcrowding and lack of study space; assignments and tests are the greatest motivators to student learning. The research process and results of developing the learning organization of Project 6 were demonstrated and disseminated via a BBS workshop and a national conference at Bolton Business School. The experience of Project 6 has been instrumental in effecting a culture scheme within BBS as other learning sets now operate looking at specific teaching and learning issues which recognize the primacy of the student experience.

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Library Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Hannelore B. Rader

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills…

Abstract

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills related to retrieving, using, and evaluating information. This review, the twentieth to be published in Reference Services Review, includes items in English published in 1993. A few are not annotated because the compiler could not obtain copies of them for this review.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Susan L. Adkins

As CD‐ROM becomes more and more a standard reference and technicalsupport tool in all types of libraries, the annual review of thistechnology published in Computers in

Abstract

As CD‐ROM becomes more and more a standard reference and technical support tool in all types of libraries, the annual review of this technology published in Computers in Libraries magazine increases in size and scope. This year, author Susan L. Adkins has prepared this exceptionally useful bibliography which she has cross‐referenced with a subject index.

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OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1906

We have before us the recently‐issued Annual Report of the Local Government Board on the work done by the Local Authorities under the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts. While…

Abstract

We have before us the recently‐issued Annual Report of the Local Government Board on the work done by the Local Authorities under the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts. While preserving the general form and arrangement of its predecessors, it shows that not only the Board itself, but the local authorities also, are coming to an increasing realisation of the importance of the subject. Six years ago we had occasion to point out some of the defects attaching to these reports, and to suggest various improvements that might be made in them. We felt, and expressed at the time our belief, that the Board was much handicapped by the form of quarterly reports imposed on the Public Analyst by the Food and Drugs Acts, and by the non‐existence of any machinery by which it could get together and collate the vast amount of information which those reports ought to, but do not, yield. Until the law is altered the present system must continue, but it is striking evidence of the lack of serious study spent on the matter that for want of effective coordination and control more than one‐half of what may be considered the real and permanent value of the Public Analyst's work goes into the waste‐paper basket. The work done by most Public Analysts as individuals is limited to some few hundreds of samples of any one article of food, but the combined expeperience of them all would in most cases — assuming it could be accurately ascertained—go far towards settling in a single year many of the thorny questions relative to standards and limits which are fought out at such great length and still greater cost to the community in the courts of law.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1904

Chocolate and cocoa are made from the “beans” or seeds of several small trees, natives of tropical America, of which Theobroma cacao (L.) is by far the most important…

Abstract

Chocolate and cocoa are made from the “beans” or seeds of several small trees, natives of tropical America, of which Theobroma cacao (L.) is by far the most important. Cocoa beans were highly esteemed by the aborigines, especially the Aztecs of Mexico and Peru, who prepared from them beverages and foods. They were brought to the notice of Europeans by Cortez and other explorers, but were not extensively imported into Europe until the seventeenth century, about the time tea and coffee were introduced from the East. At present the world's supply comes chiefly from Venezuela, Guiana, Ecuador, Brazil, Trinidad, Cuba, Mexico, and other regions bordering on the Gulf of Mexico, being gathered in these regions from trees both wild and cultivated; and also to some extent from Java, Ceylon, Africa, and other parts of the Old World, where the tree has been successfully cultivated.

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British Food Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

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Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1992

A slowed rate of market growth, industrial over‐capacity, increased competition: these are just three “trend drivers” towards relationship marketing. Philip Kotler, one of…

Abstract

A slowed rate of market growth, industrial over‐capacity, increased competition: these are just three “trend drivers” towards relationship marketing. Philip Kotler, one of the world’s leading marketing thinkers, has brought the philosophy of relationship marketing to bear on a key issue for marketing strategies, that of customer retention.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 10 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Sharon Lauricella and Kristy-Lynn Pankhurst

The purpose of this paper is to examine how fire services use social media to educate the public about safety and fire prevention.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how fire services use social media to educate the public about safety and fire prevention.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded theoretical methods were employed in a rigorous qualitative analysis of five significant fire services’ Twitter accounts in Ontario, Canada.

Findings

Seven main themes emerged from the data, with an overarching conclusion that tweets made by fire service organisations and professionals do not focus primarily on fire safety.

Research limitations/implications

This paper addresses a gap in the literature in terms of understanding how social media communicates information about all three lines of defence against fire, with a focus on the first two: public fire safety education, fire safety standards and enforcement and emergency response.

Practical implications

The authors suggest that fire services need to employ a more segmented approach to social media posts with an objective to engage and educate the public.

Originality/value

This paper is the first extensive qualitative analysis to consider the particulars of fire services’ social media presence.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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