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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Jan Hills

The author recently conducted a research with companies about their gender diversity and inclusion initiatives to understand how successfully “lighthouse” organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

The author recently conducted a research with companies about their gender diversity and inclusion initiatives to understand how successfully “lighthouse” organizations were moving the dial on creating inclusive cultures and whether an understanding of neuroscience helped to explain the importance of cultural change.

Design/methodology/approach

For the research, the author used a modeling methodology which had been designed to identify the difference that makes a difference and the things which really work.

Findings

Helping leaders understand the science behind why inclusion is important in business, the definition of inclusion, how the impact of exclusion on productivity, creativity, and engagement reduces resistance to change, and explains why the HR’s advice is beneficial to the success of the business.

Originality/value

The research found that few organizations are using an understanding of the negative impact of exclusion to make a business case for creating an inclusive culture.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Peter Cheese and Jan Hills

The purpose of the paper is to describe the relevance and application of insights from the field of neuroscience on practice and thinking of human resources (HRs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe the relevance and application of insights from the field of neuroscience on practice and thinking of human resources (HRs).

Design/methodology/approach

It draws on the experience, views and insights of the authors in providing the context, some of the key insights from neuroscience relevant to the field and examples of people management and development practices.

Findings

The paper reinforces the view of the relevance and importance of using better understanding of human behaviour through neuroscience to drive more effective people management and development practices.

Originality/value

Understanding and application of neuroscience insights to HR practices and processes is still in its early stages. The article challenges the need for a wider shift in thinking and philosophy across business to take a more human centred approach to address the shifts and challenges of the modern workplace and workforces.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2007

Jan Hills

Jan Hills, founder of the Hills Consultancy, discusses how HR can add value without breaking the bank.

Abstract

Jan Hills, founder of the Hills Consultancy, discusses how HR can add value without breaking the bank.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1973

MORE than a decade ago we were assured by the then head of Imperial Chemicals Industries that the man who knows where he is going is the one who is most likely to arrive…

Abstract

MORE than a decade ago we were assured by the then head of Imperial Chemicals Industries that the man who knows where he is going is the one who is most likely to arrive. We might venture to add as a footnote that such a man's journey will be easier, his destination more certain, if he first clears away the assorted debris that encumbers his route.

Details

Work Study, vol. 22 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1905

Referring to the question of the adulteration of brandy with silent spirit, the Standard recently observed that the question of obtaining, by legislation or otherwise, an…

Abstract

Referring to the question of the adulteration of brandy with silent spirit, the Standard recently observed that the question of obtaining, by legislation or otherwise, an improvement in the present system of public control over the purity of articles of food and drink has become one of great and even national importance. Many of the grosser kinds of adulteration, against which the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts were originally directed, are of far less frequent occurrence, but in their place has arisen a great variety of more subtle forms of adulteration, frequently very harmful, and always objectionable on account of the misrepresentation that the sophisticated article is the genuine product which the purchaser has asked for and has a right to expect. With adulteration of this kind the local authorities, whose business it is to enforce the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts, are often unable to deal satisfactorily, and this fact has been insisted upon by many scientific authorities who have interested themselves in the subject. The position of affairs with regard to spirits typifies the difficulty which constantly arises in connection with a large variety of articles of food and drink of both home and foreign manufacture. It is obvious that when cases relating to the additions of “preservative” chemicals to milk and butter, of glucose to marmalade, or the proportion of “esters” in a brandy, come before different magistrates, supported by a mass of conflicting evidence on both sides, the justices cannot be expected to come to consistent or satisfactory conclusions. Government policy in the matter seems so far to have been confined to appointing a series of committees or commissions, and afterwards doing nothing, or next to nothing, with their reports.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Lynda Tyler‐Cagni and Jan Hills

When Ermenegildo Zegna's senior management team decided to transform the organization into a performance‐oriented culture, the decision was made to start with the HR…

Abstract

Purpose

When Ermenegildo Zegna's senior management team decided to transform the organization into a performance‐oriented culture, the decision was made to start with the HR function. The purpose of this paper is to outline the challenges they met and how they were overcome.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses Ermenegildo Zegna as a case study of how to transform an organization into a performance‐oriented culture.

Findings

The move from transactional to strategic HR is not a one‐off, closed‐ended process. HR must keep ahead of the changes and needs to always be thinking of new ideas and new attitudes and to keep pushing forward.

Originality/value

The paper examines Ermenegildo Zegna's process of transformation.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Jan Hills

The purpose of this paper is to advance the view that being able fully to understand the perspective of a client is one of the key skills of successful HR people.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance the view that being able fully to understand the perspective of a client is one of the key skills of successful HR people.

Design/methodology/approach

Reveals that the most successful HR people are able to look at situations from the client's perspective at all times, although this valuable insight is rarely discussed or included in training programs. Describes how these skills can be imparted.

Findings

Emphasizes the importance of putting oneself in the client's environment, doing what the client does and adopting his or her beliefs. Shows that, by seeing the situation from the client's perspective, it also becomes easier to present an idea or an argument in an assured, convincing way.

Practical implications

Highlights a set of skills that will not come overnight, but which will eventually bring about a surprising change in the way clients relate to their HR partners.

Originality/value

Contends that, as an HR person, being able clearly to understand the client's perspective is a hugely underrated and useful tool. It will help to tailor work processes, coaching and training sessions.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Jan Hills and Caroline Rawes

The purpose of this paper is to present the 2007 Human Resource Competency Study (HRCS) from David Ulrich and his associates who gave a clear account of what HR should be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the 2007 Human Resource Competency Study (HRCS) from David Ulrich and his associates who gave a clear account of what HR should be doing and the skills needed for high‐achieving HR people to perform even better (www.rbl.net). However, what no study has yet covered are the actual processes needed to make this happen. The first author outlines how her research has found that many HR business partners (HRBPs) are still not spending a large percentage of their time fulfilling the role as set out by Ulrich. She highlights the factors that are holding HRBPs back from being truly strategic, offers solutions to overcoming these hurdles and provides advice on how HR can play such a strategic role. The second author outlines the transition that HR advisers at Linklaters have gone through by working with the first author and Orion, including the development and exercises used and how they helped the team to provide greater value and to contribute at a more strategic level to the business.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on ongoing research conducted by the first author, including surveys and interviews with HR people, and the experience of the Linklaters HR team.

Findings

One of the key drivers to making HR more strategic is confidence, both in its ability to be strategic and in the desire of the business that it supports for it to be so. If HR understands the barriers that stop strategic action, it can move forward – those barriers can often be broken down if they are recognized.

Originality/value

The paper presents a number of well‐defined techniques and practices that can be incorporated into training and support for HR people to help them develop the skills needed to perform better.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Jan Hills

This article aims to describe three examples of findings in neuroscience that can inform the execution of talent strategy.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to describe three examples of findings in neuroscience that can inform the execution of talent strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint article is prepared by an independent writer, who offers their expertise on the intersections between neuroscience and talent management.

Findings

Neuroscience research explains how we can better implement talent strategy and why adopting certain policies will get the business better results.

Practical implications

By applying the ideas in the article, talent leaders can be more successful in executing their talent strategy and meeting business goals.

Originality/value

This article offers an insight into how neuroscience can be applied to business practice in order to aid talent management and development

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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