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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Marianne Kolding, Martin Sundblad, Jan Alexa, Merlin Stone, Eleni Aravopoulou and Geraint Evans

The purpose of this paper is to explore very recent data about how large organizations are dealing with a shortage of information and communications technology (ICT…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore very recent data about how large organizations are dealing with a shortage of information and communications technology (ICT) specialists, in terms of its implications for information management.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on qualitative interview-based research with 11 large European companies, with an estimated ICT workforce of around 400,000 (about 14 per cent of ICT professionals in Europe), covering hiring, retention and upskilling of ICT staff, and expectations concerning graduates from European universities. These data are combined with International Data Corporation (IDC) analyst reports on the demand for different categories of ICT products and services, and data from the authors’ consulting work.

Findings

Larger organizations expect hiring to be a challenge, with strong competition for talent, whether from existing users or from the many rapidly digitalizing companies – digitalizing their organizations; their products and services; and their relationships with customer, suppliers and business partners. Upskilling and retraining workforces is seen by large organizations as a better approach than hiring, allowing them to create the right skills balance and retain their workers better. However, softer skills, such as communication and problem solving, are seen as just as important. ICT workers will benefit from a lifelong approach to learning, acquiring new skills and adapting existing skills. Many ICT companies have created academies for developing employee skills and certifications related to their own technologies, while the education sector has been working on creating curricula (alone or sometimes in partnerships with vendors) to improve graduate employability.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on a small sample of large companies. The situation may be different in other companies and smaller organizations.

Practical implications

Organizations can cope with the skills shortage by anticipating and working with the market forces rather than trying to oppose them.

Social implications

ICT employees will show the way for employees in other sectors where skills are scarce, by demonstrating how to reinvent themselves as the skills needed change.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that employers have changed their expectations of universities. They expect less that graduates will be ICT-employment ready, and more that they will have the skills to make and keep themselves employment ready. This has significant implications for university course design.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 31 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Katerina Berezina, Olena Ciftci and Cihan Cobanoglu

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to review and critically evaluate robots, artificial intelligence and service automation (RAISA) applications in the restaurant…

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to review and critically evaluate robots, artificial intelligence and service automation (RAISA) applications in the restaurant industry to educate professors, graduate students, and industry professionals.

Design/methodology/approach: This chapter is a survey of applications of RAISA in restaurants. The chapter is based on the review of professional and peer-reviewed academic literature, and the industry insight section was prepared based on a 50-minute interview with Mr. Juan Higueros, Chief Operations Officer of Bear Robotics.

Findings: Various case studies presented in this chapter illustrate numerous possibilities for automation: from automating a specific function to complete automation of the front of the house (e.g., Eatsa) or back of the house (e.g., Spyce robotic kitchen). The restaurant industry has already adopted chatbots; voice-activated and biometric technologies; robots as hosts, food runners, chefs, and bartenders; tableside ordering; conveyors; and robotic food delivery.

Practical implications: The chapter presents professors and students with a detailed overview of RAISA in the restaurant industry that will be useful for educational and research purposes. Restaurant owners and managers may also benefit from reading this chapter as they will learn about the current state of technology and opportunities for RAISA implementation.

Originality/value: To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this chapter presents the first systematic and in-depth review of RAISA technologies in the restaurant industry.

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Muhammad Tahir Jan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate those factors that are associated with the adoption of social networking sites from the perspective of Muslim users residing in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate those factors that are associated with the adoption of social networking sites from the perspective of Muslim users residing in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A complete self-administered questionnaire was collected from 223 Muslim users of social networking sites in Malaysia. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to sort the significant items for the constructs and to check the validity. Structural equation modelling was applied in testing the hypotheses and the fitness of the proposed model.

Findings

The results of full structural model attest that technological and social factors are the most significant factors behind the adoption of social networking sites. However, this is followed by an educational factor. Among Muslim users in Malaysia, the study does not find significant influence of brand or product communication behind this adoption.

Originality/value

The paper investigates those factors that are considered inevitable in the adoption of social networking sites. Invaluable findings were offered in the form of a structural model for the stakeholders of social networking sties. These findings can be used in planning and making decisions that may benefit all parties associated with it.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Rob Peterson, Jan Herrington, Deslea Konza, Mira Tzvetkova‐Arsova and Krassen Stefanov

The purpose of this paper is to discuss an expansion of the Special Education Bulgaria (SEB) internet community that is required to pilot software created by the European…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss an expansion of the Special Education Bulgaria (SEB) internet community that is required to pilot software created by the European Union's (EU's) Sixth Framework integrated project, TENCompetence.

Design/methodology/approach

SEB is the product of a two‐year research project designed to create a sustainable nation‐wide community of practice (CoP) for special education in Bulgaria via the internet. This paper discusses the SEB features consistent with TENCompetence concepts of competency development, lifelong learning, and professional networking. It then describes the additional features needed to prepare a SEB pilot.

Findings

SEB was developed throughout three phases of research, which included a needs assessment, formative evaluation, and effectiveness evaluation. Effectiveness evaluation results indicated that though a CoP has begun to coalesce, it remains unclear to what extent SEB helps special educators do their jobs better. In response to this finding, the implementation and testing of e‐portfolios and online courses is proposed. The implementation would employ Moodle for course management, Elgg or Mahara for e‐portfolios, and TENCompetence open‐source software for defining and organizing competencies.

Research limitations/implications

Research outcomes regarding online communities and lifelong competency development may also apply to the professional development of special educators in neighbouring Balkan countries, especially those new to or soon to enter the EU.

Originality/value

Internet‐based competency development and lifelong learning for special educators in Bulgaria, one of the EU's newest member countries, is investigated.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Yvonne R. Masakowski

Advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies and Autonomous Unmanned Vehicles are shaping our daily lives, society, and will continue to transform how we will…

Abstract

Advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies and Autonomous Unmanned Vehicles are shaping our daily lives, society, and will continue to transform how we will fight future wars. Advances in AI technologies have fueled an explosion of interest in the military and political domain. As AI technologies evolve, there will be increased reliance on these systems to maintain global security. For the individual and society, AI presents challenges related to surveillance, personal freedom, and privacy. For the military, we will need to exploit advances in AI technologies to support the warfighter and ensure global security. The integration of AI technologies in the battlespace presents advantages, costs, and risks in the future battlespace. This chapter will examine the issues related to advances in AI technologies, as we examine the benefits, costs, and risks associated with integrating AI and autonomous systems in society and in the future battlespace.

Details

Artificial Intelligence and Global Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-812-4

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Hsiu-Sen Chiang

Although increasing numbers of users have begun to use social networking sites (SNSs), the user growth of a few SNSs continues to decrease. Therefore identifying factors…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although increasing numbers of users have begun to use social networking sites (SNSs), the user growth of a few SNSs continues to decrease. Therefore identifying factors that influence users' intention to adopt and continuously use a particular SNS is a critical issue. To explore the factors, this study aims to apply the theories of reasoned action, uses and gratifications, and innovation diffusion to explain why people continue to join SNSs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study participants were members of Facebook in Taiwan. An online questionnaire was used to conduct empirical research, and the data of 348 respondents were analysed using the partial least squares regression approach.

Findings

It was found that the reasons why people continuously use SNSs vary with different innovation diffusion stages. In particular attitude toward SNSs had the strongest direct effect on continuous intention while the impact of social norms was not significant in the different innovation diffusion stages.

Practical implications

From a practical perspective, insights provided by the study can help SNS developers understand user motivation and thus design more effective marketing strategies.

Originality/value

The proposed model provides an improved understanding of the needs of different SNS users, and testing verified the effects of the factors related to gratification and innovation diffusion.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Nick V. Flor

Community‐based business models attempt to profit from the value created by individuals interacting in virtual communities. An interesting variant of this model is the…

Abstract

Community‐based business models attempt to profit from the value created by individuals interacting in virtual communities. An interesting variant of this model is the programmable autonomous business. A programmable autonomous business is an automated business built entirely in software, that once developed can profitably operate without any human involvement. We know little about how to systematically design such businesses. Existing research on designing virtual communities does not address how to transform them into autonomous businesses, nor is it clear whether all the design principles for virtual communities are relevant to an autonomous business. The research reported in this paper takes an inductive, business‐centered approach to understanding how to design autonomous businesses. The information activity in a successful, yet basic autonomous business is analyzed and its functions compared with those in a conventional business. From this analysis a set of design guidelines for a prototypical autonomous business are inferred. The paper ends with a discussion of various ways researchers can use a programmable autonomous business as a test bed for consumer‐related e‐business systems.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 7 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2021

Anisa Aini Arifin and Thomas Taro Lennerfors

Voice assistant (VA) technology is one of the fastest-growing artificial intelligence applications at present. However, the burgeoning scholarship argues that there are…

Abstract

Purpose

Voice assistant (VA) technology is one of the fastest-growing artificial intelligence applications at present. However, the burgeoning scholarship argues that there are ethical challenges relating to this new technology, not the least related to privacy, which affects the technology’s acceptance. Given that the media impacts public opinion and acceptance of VA and that there are no studies on media coverage of VA, the study focuses on media coverage. In addition, this study aims to focus on media coverage in Indonesia, a country that has been underrepresented in earlier research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used critical discourse analysis of media texts, focusing on three levels (text, discourse practice and social practice) to study how VA technology was discussed in the Indonesian context and what power relations frame the representation. In total, 501 articles were collected from seven national media in Indonesia from 2010 to 2020 and the authors particularly focus on the 45 articles that concern ethics.

Findings

The ethical topics covered are gender issues, false marketing, ethical wrongdoing, ethically positive effects, misuse, privacy and security. More importantly, when they are discussed, they are presented as constituting no real critical problem. Regarding discursive practices, the media coverage is highly influenced by foreign media and most of the articles are directed to well-educated Indonesians. Finally, regarding social practices, the authors hold that the government ideology of technological advancement is related to this positive portrayal of VAs.

Originality/value

First, to provide the first media discourse study about ethical issues of VAs. Second, to provide insights from a non-Western context, namely, Indonesia, which is underrepresented in the research on ethics of VAs.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Mike Hynes

Abstract

Details

The Social, Cultural and Environmental Costs of Hyper-Connectivity: Sleeping Through the Revolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-976-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Ina Fourie

The users of information services should be enabled to fully exploit current awareness services (CAS) on the Internet to their own benefit and also that of the larger…

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1544

Abstract

The users of information services should be enabled to fully exploit current awareness services (CAS) on the Internet to their own benefit and also that of the larger organisation. Services available via the Internet have added to the importance of current awareness, the meaning of the concept of CAS and the purposes served by CAS. Empowerment requires commitment by both parties (information services and their users), a supportive environment, a clear idea of the outcomes to be achieved, and a new attitude to the training methods and opportunities to employ. The planning of CAS empowerment programmes within the familiar constraints on information services is considered. Aspects users should know about Internet CAS are identified, the role of the information specialist is considered and a few suggestions are made about the implementation of empowerment programmes. This article is based on a paper read at the Fifth Southern African Online Meeting, held on 9 June 1999, in Midrand, South Africa.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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