Search results

1 – 10 of 11
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 April 2018

Lyn Kathryn Sonnenberg, Lesley Pritchard-Wiart and Jamiu Busari

The purpose of this study was to explore inter-professional clinicians’ perspectives on resident leadership in the context of inter-professional teams and to identify a definition…

2738

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore inter-professional clinicians’ perspectives on resident leadership in the context of inter-professional teams and to identify a definition for leadership in the clinical context. In 2015, CanMEDS changed the title of one of the core competencies from manager to leader. The shift in language was perceived by some as returning to traditional hierarchical and physician-dominant structures. The resulting uncertainty has resulted in a call to action to not only determine what physician leadership is but to also determine how to teach and assess it.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups and follow-up individual interviews were conducted with 23 inter-professional clinicians from three pediatric clinical service teams at a large, Canadian tertiary-level rehabilitation hospital. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to inductively analyze the data.

Findings

Data analysis resulted in one overarching theme: leadership is collaborative – and three related subthemes: leadership is shared; leadership is summative; and conceptualizations of leadership are shifting.

Research limitations/implications

Not all members of the three inter-professional teams were able to attend the focus group sessions because of scheduling conflicts. Participation of additional clinicians could have, therefore, affected the results of this study. The study was conducted locally at a single rehabilitation hospital, among Canadian pediatric clinicians, which highlights the need to explore conceptualization of leadership across different contexts.

Practical implications

There is an evident need to prepare physicians to be leaders in both their daily clinical and academic practices. Therefore, more concerted efforts are required to develop leadership skills among residents. The authors postulate that continued integration of various inter-professional disciplines during the early phases of training is essential to foster collaborative leadership and trust.

Originality/value

The results of this study suggest that inter-professional clinicians view clinical leadership as collaborative and fluid and determined by the fit between tasks and team member expertise. Mentorship is important for increasing the ability of resident physicians to develop collaborative leadership roles within teams. The authors propose a collaborative definition of clinical leadership based on the results of this study: a shared responsibility that involves facilitation of dialog; the integration of perspectives and expertise; and collaborative planning for the purpose of exceptional patient care.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2023

Fury Maulina, Mubasysyir Hasanbasri, Jamiu O. Busari and Fedde Scheele

This study aims to examine how an educational intervention, using the lens of the LEADS framework, can influence the development of primary care doctors’ leadership skills in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how an educational intervention, using the lens of the LEADS framework, can influence the development of primary care doctors’ leadership skills in Aceh, Indonesia. In order to persevere in the face of inadequate resources and infrastructure, particularly in rural and remote settings of low- and middle‐income countries, physicians require strong leadership skills. However, there is a lack of information on leadership development in these settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied an educational intervention consisting of a two-day workshop. The authors evaluated the impact of the workshop on participants’ knowledge and skill by combining quantitative pre- and post-intervention questionnaires (based on Levels 1 and 2 of Kirkpatrick’s model) with qualitative post-intervention in-depth interviews, using a phenomenological approach and thematic analysis.

Findings

The workshop yielded positive results, as evidenced by participants’ increased confidence to apply and use the information and skills acquired during the workshop. Critical success factors were as follows: participants were curiosity-driven; the use of multiple learning methodologies that attracted participants; and the use of authentic scenarios as a critical feature of the program.

Originality/value

The intervention may offer a preliminary model for improving physician leadership skills in rural and remote settings by incorporating multiple teaching approaches and considering local cultural norms.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Kamal Gulati and Jamiu Busari

In January 2021, India launched the world’s most extensive vaccination campaign against COVID-19. It is estimated that India would need to vaccinate over a billion people to…

Abstract

Purpose

In January 2021, India launched the world’s most extensive vaccination campaign against COVID-19. It is estimated that India would need to vaccinate over a billion people to achieve herd immunity. Even though the Indian Government focuses on improving and delivering its vaccination programme, significant challenges still exist. This paper aims to discuss current challenges to scale up India’s vaccination campaign and addresses strategies for achieving this.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a review of secondary sources, including journal articles from scholarly and grey literature and information available in the public domain. The search focused explicitly on the COVID-19 scenario, vaccination programme, public health management and systems leadership in the Indian health care system.

Findings

The analysis revealed that various factors have disrupted India’s vaccination campaign, including shortage of vaccine doses, mandatory prior online registration, lack of infrastructure, safety concerns for older people, untrained workforce and absence of a solid public health framework. Furthermore, India appears to have struggled to reduce tensions and instill trust in its ability to effectively manage the COVID-19 pandemic and vaccination programme due to a lack of cooperation between union government, state governments and other stakeholders, namely, policymakers, hospitals, industry and community.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that scaling up India’s anti-COVID vaccination programme would require system-level leadership strategies that work within the country’s limited resources. Deeper reforms in vaccine development, storage, delivery, training and regulatory frameworks are also needed to extend the world’s largest anti-COVID-19 vaccination campaign.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Lyn Kathryn Sonnenberg, Victor Do, Jerry Maniate, Ming-Ka Chan, Brent Kvern, Brittany Prevost and Jamiu Busari

Leadership decisions occur frequently throughout the day, yet as clinicians, who balance multiple roles and responsibilities, the authors seldom label them explicitly. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership decisions occur frequently throughout the day, yet as clinicians, who balance multiple roles and responsibilities, the authors seldom label them explicitly. This translates to missed opportunities to foster the requisite skill sets junior trainees to require in their current and future contexts. While there is clear evidence for a purposeful leadership curriculum, developing, implementing and assessing these competencies remains challenging. The purpose of this paper is to provide educators with a curricular approach to incorporate leadership opportunities in their own teaching and supervisory practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A dyadic “teaching and assessment” strategy may overcome leadership curricular challenges. The authors propose a new framework that breaks down leadership opportunities into their requisite learning settings. Like fine wine and cheese, these learning experiences are paired with assessment strategies to provide further formative and summative feedback, all in the context of educational theories and frameworks.

Findings

In this paper, the authors recommend six unique learning environments for educators to consider, captured in the abbreviation ABC’S3 for administrative, bedside, classroom, simulation, self-awareness and summarization, all of which lend themselves to leadership development opportunities for resident physicians. The authors provide tested examples and pair these teaching options with a variety of assessment strategies to choose from.

Practical implications

Three practical implications are put forth in this paper, namely, leadership competencies are needed for everyone, not just for those with leadership titles or positions; multiple learning settings (and all aspects of work) can be harnessed to provide diverse leadership opportunities; and advancement beyond Miller’s knows is needed to create opportunities to hone practical leadership competencies in the shows how and does levels.

Originality/value

This paper uniquely pairs learning opportunities with assessment strategies across diverse practical settings and environments. These techniques and opportunities will serve to stimulate ideas and kick-start dialogue about incorporating a practical leadership curriculum within clinical training programs.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Jamiu Busari, Ming-Ka Chan, Deepak Dath, Anne Matlow and Diane de Camps Meschino

This paper aims to describe the evolution of Sanokondu, highlighting the rationale, achievements and lessons learnt from this initiative. Sanokondu is a multinational community of…

1949

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the evolution of Sanokondu, highlighting the rationale, achievements and lessons learnt from this initiative. Sanokondu is a multinational community of practice dedicated to fostering health-care leadership education worldwide. This platform for health-care leadership education was conceived in 2014 at the first Toronto International Summit on Leadership Education for Physicians (TISLEP) and evolved into a formal network of collaborators in 2016.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a case study of a multinational collaboration of health-care leaders, educators, learners and other stakeholders. It describes Sanokondu’s development and contribution to global health-care leadership education. One of the major strategies has been establishing partnerships with other educational organizations involved in clinical leadership and health systems improvement.

Findings

A major flagship of Sanokondu has been its annual TISLEP meetings, which brings various health-care leaders, educators, learners and patients together. The meetings provide opportunities for dialog and knowledge exchange on leadership education. The work of Sanokondu has resulted in an open access knowledge bank for health-care leadership education, which in addition to the individual expertise of its members, is readily available for consultation. Sanokondu continues to contribute to scholarship in health-care leadership through ongoing research, education and dissemination in the scholarly literature.

Originality/value

Sanokondu embodies the achievements of a multinational collaboration of health-care stakeholders invested in leadership education. The interactions culminating from this platform have resulted in new insights, innovative ideas and best practices on health-care leadership education.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Lokke Gennissen, Lorette Stammen, Jolien Bueno-de-Mesquita, Sietse Wieringa and Jamiu Busari

It is assumed that the use of valid and reliable assessment methods can facilitate the development of medical residents’ management and leadership competencies. To justify this…

367

Abstract

Purpose

It is assumed that the use of valid and reliable assessment methods can facilitate the development of medical residents’ management and leadership competencies. To justify this assertion, the perceptions of an expert panel of health care leaders were explored on assessment methods used for evaluating care management (CM) development in Dutch residency programs. This paper aims to investigate how assessors and trainees value these methods and examine for any inherent benefits or shortcomings when they are applied in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi survey was conducted among members of the platform for medical leadership in The Netherlands. This panel of experts was made up of clinical educators, practitioners and residents interested in CM education.

Findings

Of the respondents, 40 (55.6 per cent) and 31 (43 per cent) participated in the first and second rounds of the Delphi survey, respectively. The respondents agreed that assessment methods currently being used to measure residents’ CM competencies were weak, though feasible for use in many residency programs. Multi-source feedback (MSF, 92.1 per cent), portfolio/e-portfolio (86.8 per cent) and knowledge testing (76.3 per cent) were identified as the most commonly known assessment methods with familiarity rates exceeding 75 per cent.

Practical implications

The findings suggested that an “assessment framework” comprising MSF, portfolios, individual process improvement projects or self-reflections and observations in clinical practice should be used to measure CM competencies in residents.

Originality/value

This study reaffirms the need for objective methods to assess CM skills in post-graduate medical education, as there was not a single assessment method that stood out as the best instrument.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Ming-Ka Chan, Diane de Camps Meschino, Deepak Dath, Jamiu Busari, Jordan David Bohnen, Lindy Michelle Samson, Anne Matlow and Melchor Sánchez-Mendiola

This paper aims to highlight the importance of leadership development for all physicians within a competency-based medical education (CBME) framework. It describes the importance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the importance of leadership development for all physicians within a competency-based medical education (CBME) framework. It describes the importance of timely international collaboration as a key strategy in promoting physician leadership development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores published and Grey literature around physician leadership development and proposes that international collaboration will meet the expanding call for development of leadership competencies in postgraduate medical learners. Two grounding frameworks were used: complexity science supports adding physician leadership training to the current momentum of CBME adoption, and relational cultural theory supports the engagement of diverse stakeholders in multiple jurisdictions around the world to ensure inclusivity in leadership education development.

Findings

An international collaborative identified key insights regarding the need to frame physician leadership education within a competency-based model.

Practical implications

International collaboration can be a vehicle for developing a globally relevant, generalizable physician leadership curriculum. This model can be expanded to encourage innovation, scholarship and program evaluation.

Originality/value

A competency-based leadership development curriculum is being designed by an international collaborative. The curriculum is based on established leadership and education frameworks. The international collaboration model provides opportunities for ongoing sharing, networking and diversification.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Anne Matlow, Ming-Ka Chan, Jordan David Bohnen, Daniel Mark Blumenthal, Melchor Sánchez-Mendiola, Diane de Camps Meschino, Lindy Michelle Samson and Jamiu Busari

Physicians are often ill-equipped for the leadership activities their work demands. In part, this is due to a gap in traditional medical education. An emergent international…

421

Abstract

Purpose

Physicians are often ill-equipped for the leadership activities their work demands. In part, this is due to a gap in traditional medical education. An emergent international network is developing a globally relevant leadership curriculum for postgraduate medical education. The purpose of this article is to share key learnings from this process to date.

Design/methodology/approach

The Toronto International Summit on Leadership Education for Physicians (TISLEP) was hosted by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine and Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. Of 64 attendees from eight countries, 34 joined working groups to develop leadership competencies. The CanMEDS Competency Framework, stage of learner development and venue of learning formed the scaffold for the work. Emotional intelligence was selected as the topic to test the feasibility of fruitful international collaboration; results were presented at TISLEP 2015.

Findings

Dedicated international stakeholders engaged actively and constructively through defined working groups to develop a globally relevant, competency-based curriculum for physician leadership education. Eleven principles are recommended for consideration in physician leadership curriculum development. Defining common language and taxonomy is essential for a harmonized product. The importance of establishing an international network to support implementation, evaluation, sustainability and dissemination of the work was underscored.

Originality/value

International stakeholders are collaborating successfully on a graduated, competency-based leadership curriculum for postgraduate medical learners. The final product will be available for adaptation to local needs. An international physician leadership education network is being developed to support and expand the work underway.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Ming-Ka Chan, Graham Dickson, David A. Keegan, Jamiu O. Busari, Anne Matlow and John Van Aerde

The purpose of this paper was to determine the complementarity between the Canadian Medical Education Directions for Specialists (CanMEDS) physician competency and LEADS…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to determine the complementarity between the Canadian Medical Education Directions for Specialists (CanMEDS) physician competency and LEADS leadership capability frameworks from three perspectives: epistemological, philosophical and pragmatic. Based on those findings, the authors propose how the frameworks collectively layout pathways of lifelong learning for physician leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach combining critical discourse analysis with a modified Delphi, the authors examined “How complementary the CanMEDS and LEADS frameworks are in guiding physician leadership development and practice” with the following sub-questions: What are the similarities and differences between CanMEDS and LEADS from: An epistemological and philosophical perspective? The perspective of guiding physician leadership training and practice? How can CanMEDS and LEADS guide physician leadership development from medical school to retirement?

Findings

Similarities and differences exist between the two frameworks from philosophical and epistemological perspectives with significant complementarity. Both frameworks are founded on a caring ethos and value physician leadership – CanMEDS (for physicians) and LEADS (physicians as one of many professions) define leadership similarly. The frameworks share beliefs in the function of leadership, embrace a belief in distributed leadership, and although having some philosophical differences, have a shared purpose (preparing for changing health systems). Practically, the frameworks are mutually supportive, addressing leadership action in different contexts and where there is overlap, complement one another in intent and purpose.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to map the CanMEDS (physician competency) and LEADS (leadership capabilities) frameworks. By determining the complementarity between the two, synergies can be used to influence physician leadership capacity needed for today and the future.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Graham Dickson and Karen Owen

400

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

1 – 10 of 11