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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Jamie Kang and Tim Leung

The purpose of this study is to analyze the overnight and intraday returns of the most traded American Depositary Receipts (ADRs) of Asian companies, understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze the overnight and intraday returns of the most traded American Depositary Receipts (ADRs) of Asian companies, understand the different levels of volatilities realized in these asynchronous markets and develop trading strategies based on empirical findings.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents an empirical analysis on the overnight and intraday returns of Asian ADRs. The authors propose a measure to quantify the relative contributions of the intraday and overnight returns to the ADR's total volatility. Furthermore, the return difference between S&P500 index and each ADR is fitted to an Ornstein–Uhlenbeck model via maximum-likelihood estimation.

Findings

This study finds that ADRs' overnight returns are more volatile, whereas the intraday returns are significantly more strongly correlated with the US market returns. The return spreads between the S&P500 and ADRs are found to be a mean-reverting time series and motivate a pairs trading strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology used in this study is not limited to Asian ADRs and can be adapted to analyze the overnight and intraday returns of other non-Asian ADRs and stocks.

Practical implications

Investors should be aware of the overnight price fluctuations while intraday traders may consider strategies that capture the mean-reverting return spread between an ADR (or an Exchange-Traded Funds [ETF] of Asian stocks) and the S&P500 index ETF (SPY).

Social implications

ADRs are among the most popular securities for investing in foreign (non-US) companies. The total global investments in ADRs are estimated to be close to US$1tn. Understanding the risks of ADRs is important to not only individual/institutional investors but also regulators.

Originality/value

This study provides a new measure to quantify and compare the relative contributions of volatility by overnight and intraday returns. Optimized pairs trading strategies involving ADRs and ETFs are developed and backtested.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

D. A. Hutchinson

This chapter disrupts the common notion that identity can be understood through the use of categories. Categorical terms like gay, straight, man, or woman often mask the…

Abstract

This chapter disrupts the common notion that identity can be understood through the use of categories. Categorical terms like gay, straight, man, or woman often mask the complexity of curriculum making and identity-making. Curriculum making and identity-making are narrative terms used to understand the dynamic, relational, and on-going process of making meaning about people, things, contexts, and identity through experience. Identity making, understood narratively as the composition of stories to live by, allows us to image diverse communities, contexts, and experiences that uniquely shape the stories that people live and tell. Inquiring into the experiences of two research participants, I begin the chapter by thinking with Calle’s stories of experience to explore the limited and limiting categorical stories of identity. Then, I consider Jamie’s stories to live by, attending to the role of his contexts and communities in the composition of his stories to live by. In doing so, I seek to further map out the narrative geography of curriculum making and identity-making places and communities for individuals who compose diverse stories to live by. Building on previous research findings that contexts shape the composition of stories to live by as identity is negotiated through these dominant stories as an individual’s ontology, his/her story of the world and self in it, is constituted in part, by these dominant stories; here, I argue that contexts that allow for diverse stories to be told are those that attend to experience rather than clinging to familiar dominant stories.

Details

Landscapes, Edges, and Identity-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-598-1

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Jamie Costley, Ashleigh Southam, Daniel Bailey and Shaibou Abbdoulai Haji

Online learning and the use of technology-based learning management systems (LMS) are on the rise in higher education. The purpose of this study is to explore how the…

Abstract

Purpose

Online learning and the use of technology-based learning management systems (LMS) are on the rise in higher education. The purpose of this study is to explore how the frequent use of these LMS mediates the relationship between three types of learner interactions and student outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This was an exploratory study using surveys that collected information on students’ use of LMS, their interactions and student outcomes. The participants of this study consisted of 362 undergraduate students from a South Korean University who were taking online classes as part of their degree.

Findings

The findings support existing research that increased learner interactions have positive effects on learning outcomes. However, some of the positive effects were reduced when considering the effect of higher levels of LMS use. In particular, learner-to-learner interactions.

Research limitations/implications

This information will enable educators to identify, measure and evaluate their online courses and consider how to integrate LMS use effectively. Results imply that focus may need to be on how learner to learner interactions can be best supported through the application of LMS.

Practical implications

This information will enable educators to identify, measure and evaluate their online courses and consider how to integrate LMS use effectively.

Social implications

Learner-to-learner interaction through social networking platforms may be more beneficial in socially constructing knowledge than formalizing interaction through LMS.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the field of online learning by suggesting that the importance of some types of learner interactions may be overestimated in relation to the importance of LMS use.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Brendan Richard, Stephen Sivo, Marissa Orlowski, Robert Ford, Jamie Murphy, David Boote and Eleanor Witta

This paper aims to test the idea generation capabilities of online text-based focus groups as compared to the traditional in-person focus groups using sustainability in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test the idea generation capabilities of online text-based focus groups as compared to the traditional in-person focus groups using sustainability in the hospitality industry as the idea generation topic. Idea generation quantity and quality are analyzed and the theoretical and practical implications for the hospitality industry are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study tested the quality of ideas generated by online versus in-person focus groups. Participants were purposively sampled from the hospitality program at a large southeastern United States university and randomly assigned into one of two treatment groups: online text-based or traditional in-person focus groups. During both treatment groups participants generated ideas focused on sustainability in the hospitality industry.

Findings

The online focus group generated a comparable quantity of ideas, in addition to a similar average quality of ideas and number of good ideas.

Practical implications

The generation of ideas and the selection of opportunities drive the innovation process through which firms can strengthen their competitive advantage and maintain and grow market share and profitability. The results of this study may assist hospitality firms in determining which form of qualitative research delivers the highest return on investment by generating the best ideas at the lowest cost.

Originality/value

This paper breaks new ground by assessing the effectiveness of idea generation in online versus traditional focus groups, comparing both the quantity and quality of ideas generated from an experimental study that uses random assignment.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Ashley D. Vancil-Leap

This ethnographic study of school food service employees at an elementary, middle, and high school in the Midwest introduces “feeding labor,” a concept to signify a form…

Abstract

Purpose

This ethnographic study of school food service employees at an elementary, middle, and high school in the Midwest introduces “feeding labor,” a concept to signify a form of gendered labor that entails emotional and bodily feeding activities.

Methodology

This chapter is based on 18 months of participant-observation and 25 in-depth interviews.

Findings

I illustrate three characteristics of feeding labor: (1) the physical labor of attending to the feeding needs of customers, (2) the emotional labor of managing feelings to create and respond to customers, and (3) variations in the gendered performance of feeding labor as explained through the intersection of race, class, and age. These dimensions vary across different field sites and emerge as three distinct patterns of feeding labor: (1) motherly feeding labor involves physical and emotional attentiveness and nurturing with mostly middle- and upper-class young white customers, (2) tough-love feeding labor involves a mix of tough, but caring respect and discipline when serving mostly working- and lower-middle class racially mixed young teens, and (3) efficient feeding labor involves fast, courteous service when serving mostly working- and middle-class predominantly white teenagers.

Implications

These findings show that a caring and nurturing style of emotional and physical labor is central in schools with white, middle-class, young students, but that other forms of gendered feeding labor are performed in schools composed of students with different race, class, and age cohorts that emphasize displaying tough-love and efficiency while serving students food. Examining this form of labor allows us to see how social inequalities are maintained and sustained in the school cafeteria.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Daniel Bailey, Ashleigh Southam and Jamie Costley

This study aims to increase language learning (L2) output by incorporating a digital storytelling chatbot system (known as a “storybot”) that focused interactions on a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to increase language learning (L2) output by incorporating a digital storytelling chatbot system (known as a “storybot”) that focused interactions on a narrative. This study also sought to investigate student perceptions of these storybot interactions and improve on poor perception rates from previous studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This one-sample exploratory study was of student-storybot participation rates and student perceptions towards a storybot activity designed to increase L2 output. A combination of storybot participation analytics and survey analysis of student perception was carried out.

Findings

The use of storybots in the L2 class resulted in mixed participation rates. Students read nine times more than they wrote, indicating a high degree of reading comprehension necessary for storybot interaction. Survey results revealed that students believed storybots helped them meet their L2 goals, were relevant to their L2 and were easy to navigate.

Research limitations/implications

Interactions were through text messaging so no impact on speech or pronunciation could be observed. Further, the context was within a single university class in South Korea, restricting the generalization of findings to outside regions or with younger learners. Finally, while storybots proved to be valuable reading comprehension activities, the next step in this line of chatbot research should incorporate more writing prompts.

Practical implications

Storybots revealed explicit benefits to reading comprehension, as measured by cohesion between storybot delivered comprehension questions and student responses. Moreover, storybots can be used as examples for students in their own story creation, classroom forms to collect relevant student information regarding learning objectives and platforms for class quizzes.

Social implications

Storybots scaffold students through conversations, which abide by socio-pragmatic norms, providing models for L2 learners to incorporate in real-world text-based communication. Additionally, a wide range of idiomatic expressions is contextualized in comprehensible interactions that students can learn from the storybot then practice with friends.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing research on the use of chatbots for second L2 and offers specific insight into the use of narrative storybots as a means to increase L2 output and potentially benefit L2 reading comprehension.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Carlos Molina and Jamie L. Callahan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the connections between individual learning, intrapreneurship, and organizational learning to create an alternative model of how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the connections between individual learning, intrapreneurship, and organizational learning to create an alternative model of how learning facilitates performance in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper selecting targeted scholarly works that provide support for the proposed model.

Findings

The paper presents a model of intrapreneurial learning and performance in which the constructs of environment, individual learning, intrapreneurship, and organizational learning influence organizational performance. Intrapreneurship is a relatively recent area of exploration in which scholarly efforts have primarily focused on identifying the construct and distinguishing it from entrepreneurship. The proposed model of intrapreneurial learning and performance joins a growing number of works that explore how intrapreneurship contributes to organizational performance. It is suggested that the framework may help scholars identify potential strategies of learning that could help organizations position intrapreneurship as a vehicle for improving organizational performance.

Originality/value

The paper postulates an original relationship among individual learning, intrapreneurship, organizational learning, environment, and organizational performance. In this framework, individual and organizational learning combine to offer a unique perspective on the link between intrapreneurship and organizational performance.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Jamie Costley

As online learning has become more prevalent, how learners interact with each other in those learning environments has become more salient. To develop effective levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

As online learning has become more prevalent, how learners interact with each other in those learning environments has become more salient. To develop effective levels of interaction, students must feel comfortable to express their ideas and views. For this reason, this paper aims to look at how individual students’ levels of social presence affect germane cognitive load. Germane cognitive load is the amount that students are able to construct schema and can be seen as analogous to learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This study looks at the results of survey data (n = 433) that investigate the relationship between social presence and germane cognitive load. The students were surveyed from the Open Cyber University of Korea in the fall semester of 2018.

Findings

The present study found a statistically significant positive relationship between social presence and germane cognitive load. The study found a Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.595. Furthermore, the sample was divided into a high, medium and low grouping of social presence. Among these groupings, the high level social presence had the highest level of germane cognitive load, and the low level social presence had the lowest level of germane cognitive load.

Originality/value

This result shows the importance and value of developing levels of social presence in online environments. Some research has shown relationships between student interaction and learning, but the present study looks directly at social presence and germane cognitive load. From this research, the authors can see the value of encouraging higher levels of social interaction in online learning environments.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Sajad Rezaei, Muslim Amin, Minoo Moghaddam and Norshidah Mohamed

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of service quality, perceived usefulness and users’ cognitive satisfaction to determine the third-generation (3G) mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of service quality, perceived usefulness and users’ cognitive satisfaction to determine the third-generation (3G) mobile phone users’ behavioural retention in using 3G telecommunications services.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 243 valid questionnaires were collected from 3G users in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. The combination of partial least squares (PLS) path modelling approach and structural equation modelling (SEM; PLS-SEM) technique was used to analyze the measurement and structural model.

Findings

Our empirical assessment supports the proposed research hypotheses and further suggests that service quality is a second-order reflective construct comprising navigation and visual design, management and customer service and system reliability and connection quality.

Originality/value

Prior studies have examined the impact of service quality, perceived usefulness, overall users’ satisfaction and behavioural intention on an information system in general. This study is among the few studies that have attempted to gain insights into 3G users’ post-adoption experience with telecommunications services.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Mohamed H. Elsharnouby, Jasmine Mohsen, Omnia T. Saeed and Abeer A. Mahrous

This study aims to examine the relationships between the online communities’ characteristics and resilience to negative information (RNI) mediated by both brand knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships between the online communities’ characteristics and resilience to negative information (RNI) mediated by both brand knowledge and brand involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

According to stimulus-organism-response (S-O-R) framework, this research postulates that information quality, rewards and virtual interactivity drive RNI directly and indirectly through brand knowledge and/ or brand involvement. A survey of 326 Facebook pages followers was conducted, representing followers of fashion clothing brands in social media platforms in Egypt. We have used AMOS to check the constructs’ validity and reliability, as well as the Hayes’s PROCESS macro to test the mediation.

Findings

The findings show that information quality, rewards and virtual interactivity are the respective drivers of brand knowledge and brand involvement; the brand knowledge and brand involvement help explain why consumers are resilient to negative information of specific brands; and the drivers of brand knowledge and/ or brand involvement differ in consumers who tend to ignore negative information they receive about the brand.

Practical implications

Outcomes of the research recommend that executives should identify the outstanding determinants for improving resilient consumers to negative information through creating the highest possible brand knowledge and involvement between the consumers and brands.

Originality/value

Little attention has been paid to examine the RNI and linking it with brand knowledge and brand involvement in online communities’ context, thus, the current research is conducted.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

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