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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Carrie A. Belsito, Christopher R. Reutzel and Jamie D. Collins

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between human resource (HR) executive representation in top management and the growth of newly public firms. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between human resource (HR) executive representation in top management and the growth of newly public firms. It draws upon research on strategic leadership, strategic HR management and Penrose’s theory of firm growth to consider the role of HRs executives in addressing demands placed upon top managers in the pursuit of firm growth. This study attempts to extend the focus of research on the influence of HR executives on organizational outcomes

Design/methodology/approach

In order to test study hypotheses, this study analyses data from a sample of US newly public firms that underwent initial public offerings (IPO) during the 2007 calendar year. Study data were analyzed using ordinary least squares regression in order to test study hypotheses.

Findings

This study provides general support for study hypotheses. First, HR executive presence in top management was found to be positively related to post-IPO firm growth. Second, upper echelon size and the number of firm employees were found to weaken the positive effect of HR executive presence in top management on post-IPO firm growth.

Research limitations/implications

As a consequence of study design, the results found in this study may be limited with respect to their external validity. Therefore, researchers and practitioners are encouraged to use caution before generalizing study findings to other contexts.

Practical implications

This study provides implications for top management team staffing and the pursuit of firm growth. Newly public firms appear to benefit in terms of firm growth by including HR executives in top management. The benefits of doing so appear to be reduced for newly public firms as the size of their upper echelons and number of employees increase.

Originality/value

This study extends research on the firm level consequences of HR executive presence in top management as well as research on factors which influence firm growth.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2018

Christopher R. Reutzel, Jamie D. Collins and Carrie A. Belsito

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of business leader gender on the pursuit of innovation opportunities. Extant research suggests that leader gender…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of business leader gender on the pursuit of innovation opportunities. Extant research suggests that leader gender represents an important characteristic that shapes firm behavior in various ways. The authors build upon this research by relating business leader gender, perceptions of environmental munificence and distributive justice to firm investment in innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the survey responses of 469 business leaders in India. These individuals were primarily responsible for their firms. Their responses to survey questions were analyzed using ordinary least squares regression.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that female-led firms exhibit less investment in innovation than male-led firms. Results also suggest that female business leaders perceive less environmental munificence as well as distributive justice. Finally, study results suggest that the effect of gender on firm investment in innovation is mediated by perceptions of distributive justice.

Originality/value

This study provides an empirical link between business leader gender and firm investment in innovation. In doing so, it acknowledges and provides insight into the gendered nature of the initiation of innovation processes and leadership. Finally, the finding that business leader perceptions of distributive justice mediate the relationship between business leader gender and investment in innovation extends current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the lower investment in innovation rates exhibited by female-led firms.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Jamie D. Collins, Dan Li and Purva Kansal

This study focuses on home country institutions as sources of variation in the level of foreign investment into India. Our findings support the idea that institutional…

Abstract

This study focuses on home country institutions as sources of variation in the level of foreign investment into India. Our findings support the idea that institutional voids found in India are less of a deterrent to investments from home countries with high levels of institutional development than from home countries with similar institutional voids. Overall, foreign investments in India are found to be significantly related to the strength of institutions within home countries. The levels of both approved and realized foreign direct investment (FDI) are strongly influenced by economic factors and home country regulative institutions, and weakly influenced by home country cognitive institutions. When considered separately, the cognitive institutions and regulative institutions within a given home country each significantly influence the level of approved/realized FDI into India. However, when considered jointly, only the strength of regulative institutions is predictive of FDI inflows.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Christopher R. Reutzel, Carrie A. Belsito and Jamie D. Collins

This study aims to draw upon research from strategic human resource management (HRM) and strategic management to examine how HRM demands influence the likelihood that…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to draw upon research from strategic human resource management (HRM) and strategic management to examine how HRM demands influence the likelihood that chief executive officers (CEOs) will staff top management with a human resource (HR) executive.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory and hypotheses developed in this study are tested on a sample of US initial public offering firms from the calendar year 2007, using logistic regression.

Findings

The results of hypothesis tests suggest that HR executive presence in top management is positively related to the HRM demands faced by a CEO stemming from product/service innovation strategies, the number of HRs employed by the firm and CEO’s financial orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study may not generalize to other settings. This study does not simultaneously consider the role of other structural forms which may increase or reduce the degree of HRM demands faced by the CEO. This study extends prior research on executive job demands by expanding the understanding of factors which give rise to HRM sources of executive job demands. Study results suggest that CEOs with financial orientations are more likely to staff their top management teams with an HR executive, which suggests that in the face of executive job demands stemming from a particular functional area, CEOs delegate responsibility for that function to another member of top management. This finding suggests that CEOs can, and in fact do, recognize the limitations engendered by their experiences and that when confronted with a specific type of executive job demand that does not align with their expertise, they take steps to address their individual limitations by appointing others that are more capable of addressing the particular source of executive job demand.

Practical implications

Study results suggest that product/service innovation strategies, CEO’s financial background and the number of HRs employed by the firm increase the likelihood of HR functional representation in top management.

Originality/value

The theory and results of this study extend the focus of extant research on factors giving rise to HRM’s functional representation in top management. Although prior research has emphasized the role of ownership characteristics and risk preferences in the adoption of this structural form, this study examines the role of CEO HRM demands. This approach allows for the integration of the upper echelons theory with the strategic HRM literature and provides an empirical examination of CEO job demands arising from the HRM function.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2010

Jamie D. Collins, William J. Worthington, Pedro M. Reyes and Marisabel Romero

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual overview of the relationship between knowledge management, supply chain technology investments, and overall firm…

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4478

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual overview of the relationship between knowledge management, supply chain technology investments, and overall firm performance. Additionally, a historical review of supply chain development is offered along with a comprehensive list of supply chain measures currently in use and a discussion of how those measures align within the overall firm strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on knowledge management theory, the paper argues herein that the transitory nature of firm‐level differentiation and the ease with which competitors gain access to each others' business strategies demand that firms stay flexible. It is also argued that translating firm knowledge resources into useable knowledge management capabilities may enable firms to enhance their likelihood of competitive advantage.

Findings

Many leading firms drive towards new advantages through supply chain information capturing investments. By capturing data and mining that information, firms are better equipped to identify impending changes in the environment and to adjust their strategies accordingly.

Practical implications

Firms that have a developed sense of competiveness are more likely to capture and utilize the increased datum provided by IT investments and more likely to implement that knowledge in a way that leads to operational improvements. As firms pursue global markets, supply chain complexity grows exponentially. Firms will need to respond and operations managers will need to find ways to empirically measure their performance to find improvements. Every investment in supply technology should be driven by an understanding of the inextricably inter‐connectedness of knowledge management capabilities and the firm's ability to effectively implement its corporate strategies. By emphasizing the inter‐connection between knowledge management and supply chain technology investments, firms improve their potential for developing a competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique conceptual framework intended to aid researchers and managers develop a more thorough understanding of the linkages between knowledge management capabilities, supply chain technology investments, and overall firm performance.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Pedro M. Reyes, William J. Worthington and Jamie D. Collins

The purpose of this study is to explore the investment of supply chain technology-to-performance path relationship through the lens of the resource-based view (RBV) as…

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1885

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the investment of supply chain technology-to-performance path relationship through the lens of the resource-based view (RBV) as illuminated by the organizational learning literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed top-level managers who are registered members of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals.

Findings

Using factor analysis and OLS regression on 300+ supply chain professionals, this study confirms that investments in both enterprise- and radio frequency identification (RFID)-specific knowledge management (KM) tools yield substantial benefits to the firm’s knowledge management system (KMS) which is the dependent path to higher supply chain performance.

Research limitations/implications

This sample was taken with supply chain professionals who are more likely to value supply chain investments as part of their responsibility.

Practical implications

The authors believe that the empirical study on supply chain investment from a resource-based perspective will contribute to the ongoing RBV theoretical discussions while providing insights for practitioners in the realm of supply chain investment.

Originality/value

Every investment in supply technology should be driven by an understanding of the inextricably inter-connectedness of knowledge management capabilities and the firm’s ability to effectively implement its corporate strategies. By emphasizing the inter-connection between knowledge management and supply chain technology investments, firms improve their potential for developing a competitive advantage.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Christian Walsh, Paul Knott and Jamie Collins

Innovation is an essential process for growth and well-being of organisations and society in general but is difficult to manage successfully. Through a better…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation is an essential process for growth and well-being of organisations and society in general but is difficult to manage successfully. Through a better understanding of the innovation mindsets as established strategists use them in practice, this paper aims to improve firms’ success rates of innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine how innovation processes play out in dynamic environments, the authors undertook a longitudinal two-year multi-case study in the high-tech sector.

Findings

Strategists in this study showed distinct phases in their successful innovation journey with three dominant mindsets of curiosity, creativity and clarity. The curiosity phase includes actions focused on discovering and understanding the implications and significance of an opportunity. The creativity phase includes actions focused on creating and testing a wide range of options. The clarity phase consists of actions focused on resourcing and implementing change.

Practical implications

In adopting this framework for use in the field, the authors recommend strategists take time for discovering and getting to core understanding in the curiosity phase. They should then take action by creating and actively testing a broad range of solution ideas in the creativity phase. Finally, organisations need to take care with clear direction and communication when resourcing and implementing in the clarity phase.

Originality/value

This novel framework which emerged from the longitudinal field research describes the mindsets of innovation and how these are used at different phases in the innovation process.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2015

Nathalie Collins, Hanna Gläbe, Dick Mizerski and Jamie Murphy

Industry publications abound with tips on how to create and nurture customer evangelism. Scholarly publications note the effects of evangelism to firms. Consultants…

Abstract

Purpose

Industry publications abound with tips on how to create and nurture customer evangelism. Scholarly publications note the effects of evangelism to firms. Consultants promote evangelism creation as part of their skill set. Yet the existence customer evangelism and its effects remain unsupported by empirical evidence. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively explore customer evangelism.

Methodology/approach

This paper takes one of the first steps towards empirical analysis of customer evangelism by using a formative composite latent variable model to identify customer evangelists from a survey population. The authors then compare customer evangelists against non-customer evangelists on key characteristics, as per the claims in the qualitative literature, to verify the accuracy of the selection model.

Findings

The analysis demonstrates that key claims in the qualitative literature in regard to customer evangelists are supported by quantitative data in this study, namely that customer evangelists are focused on authenticity, cultishness and sharing knowledge, and have a deep emotional and spiritual connection to the brand. They also have higher intentions to purchase the product in future than do non-customer evangelists. However, other claims in the qualitative literature – such as that customer evangelists are more socially oriented, knowledge-seeking, experientially oriented or idealistic than are non-customer evangelists – are not supported by the data in this study, or are inconclusive.

Originality/value of paper

This study is one of the first to attempt to empirically identify customer evangelists, and is part of a movement to study consumer religiosity in an empirical context. This study paves the way for further empirical research into customer evangelism, consumer religiosity and consumer collectivism.

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Aykut Berber

The purpose of this paper is to examine inclusion as subjectively created knowledge individuals generate through their interactions within a social environment. The main…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine inclusion as subjectively created knowledge individuals generate through their interactions within a social environment. The main purpose is to introduce an inclusion-related conceptualisation of intelligence by means of which an individual evaluates, understands and engages in action in a work-setting in order to achieve efficient outcomes while feeling belonged and unique in a work-setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Aiming at explaining a phenomenon and building a conceptual framework from the subjective perspective of a particular individual at work, such as a team member, the philosophical assumption embedded in this paper is social constructivism.

Findings

A substantive conclusion drawn in this paper is the importance of an individual’s personal resources, such as optimism, resilience, self-efficacy and positive psychology, to evaluate situational conditions, and take necessary actions, which in turn determines how included that individual feels in a work-setting. Moreover, dyadic interactions are also substantial, and one-to-one communication in every dyad is essential for the “co-construction” of an individual’s inclusion.

Research limitations/implications

A scale development effort to explore and validate a construct for inclusionary intelligence and its domains can be suggested for future research.

Practical implications

While management literature, in general, lays much emphasis on managing diversity in team and organisations, this paper puts stress on the perspective of the individual at work.

Originality/value

The paper elaborates on the nature of inclusion with a social constructivist paradigm and approaches inclusion as a feeling, an experience, a subjective interpretation of one’s own position in a work-setting and an important predictor of one’s job satisfaction and well-being at work.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Jamie O’Quinn

Child marriage, or marriage between two individuals when one or both are under the age of 18, is legal and practiced in 48 US states. Despite this, child marriage is…

Abstract

Child marriage, or marriage between two individuals when one or both are under the age of 18, is legal and practiced in 48 US states. Despite this, child marriage is commonly understood as only occurring in the Global South. Child marriage laws shed light on the paradoxical policies that most US states enforce regarding young people’s sexual agency. By legalizing sex between adults and minors within the institution of marriage, child marriage provides exception to statutory rape laws, which classify sex between minors and adults as sexual violence. In this chapter, I draw on feminist and queer theories to critically examine the racialized and gendered effects of these contradictory state policies. First, I analyze US age of consent laws’ reliance on an adult/child binary that constructs adults and minors as essentially and radically different. Second, I explore efforts to challenge the adult/child binary, looking at how frameworks for understanding sexual violence that are rooted in an adult/child binary can exacerbate young people’s vulnerability to sexual violence. Third, I discuss feminist efforts to theorize sexual violence outside of binary logics and their implications for research on child marriage. I conclude by discussing areas for future research on child marriage that attend to the racialized and gendered inequalities that undergird the state regulation of youth sexualities.

Details

Victim, Perpetrator, or What Else?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-335-8

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