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Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2015

Deirdre McCaughey, Jami DelliFraine and Cathleen O. Erwin

Hospitals in North America consistently have employee injury rates ranking among the highest of all industries. Organizations that mandate workplace safety training and…

Abstract

Purpose

Hospitals in North America consistently have employee injury rates ranking among the highest of all industries. Organizations that mandate workplace safety training and emphasize safety compliance tend to have lower injury rates and better employee safety perceptions. However, it is unclear if the work environment in different national health care systems (United States vs. Canada) is associated with different employee safety perceptions or injury rates. This study examines occupational safety and workplace satisfaction in two different countries with employees working for the same organization.

Methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from environmental services employees (n = 148) at three matched hospitals (two in Canada and one in the United States). The relationships that were examined included: (1) safety leadership and safety training with individual/unit safety perceptions; (2) supervisor and coworker support with individual job satisfaction and turnover intention; and (3) unit turnover, labor usage, and injury rates.

Findings

Hierarchical regression analysis and ANOVA found safety leadership and safety training to be positively related to individual safety perceptions, and unit safety grade and effects were similar across all hospitals. Supervisor and coworker support were found to be related to individual and organizational outcomes and significant differences were found across the hospitals. Significant differences were found in injury rates, days missed, and turnover across the hospitals.

Originality/value

This study offers support for occupational safety training as a viable mechanism to reduce employee injury rates and that a codified training program translates across national borders. Significant differences were found between the hospitals with respect to employee and organizational outcomes (e.g., turnover). These findings suggest that work environment differences are reflective of the immediate work group and environment, and may reflect national health care system differences.

Details

International Best Practices in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-278-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

James R. Langabeer and Jami DelliFraine

Although management researchers have long recognized that cognitive and behavioral constructs can influence strategic process, there have been surprisingly few empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

Although management researchers have long recognized that cognitive and behavioral constructs can influence strategic process, there have been surprisingly few empirical studies exploring their actual influence. More specifically, there have been no reported findings examining how an executive's general tendency to expect positive outcomes (i.e. optimism) shapes their strategic process. The purpose of this paper is to examine if optimism serves as a cognitive bias that short‐circuits the strategic process, or more specifically results in a greater use of incrementalism versus a comprehensive rational process.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an initial study to explore the relationships between optimism and strategic process. The authors opted for a large cross‐sectional sample of chief executive officers (CEOs) in the for‐profit sector of the US healthcare industry, distributed 810 surveys, and received a 21 percent response rate. The authors' methods incorporated the well‐established Life Orientation Test for optimism, and interaction effect regression models, correlations, and ANOVAs were used to test relationships.

Findings

It was found that at the time of the study, executives were more optimistic than average. It was further found that higher optimism is associated with less rational (and more incremental) strategic decision‐making processes. Organizational size also had an interaction effect on the optimism‐strategic process relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The authors operationalized only a few variables in this initial study. A more comprehensive study, utilizing many more variables and exploring optimism for the top management team (beyond just the CEO) is being incorporated into subsequent studies.

Practical implications

If disposition (e.g. optimism) is associated with strategic processes, then a better understanding of executive's dispositions could be used to better align CEOs with organizational types and stage of life cycle.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind to begin to explore the association between dispositional optimism and strategic processes.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2011

Harry D. Holt, Jonathan Clark, Jami DelliFraine and Diane Brannon

This chapter reviews and integrates the empirical literature on the influence of organizational factors on hospital financial performance. Five categories of…

Abstract

This chapter reviews and integrates the empirical literature on the influence of organizational factors on hospital financial performance. Five categories of organizational characteristics that research has addressed are identified and examined as part of the review: ownership, governance, integration, management strategy, and quality. With some exceptions, our review reveals a general lack of consistency and conclusiveness across studies in each area. Exceptions were found in the areas of governance (e.g., physician participation and board processes) and integration (e.g., horizontal system centralization). Despite the lack of conclusive findings across studies, our review suggests substantial opportunities for future work, including opportunities for qualitative and exploratory work. Additional implications for theory and management are discussed.

Details

Biennial Review of Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-714-8

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2014

James Langabeer, Jeffrey Helton, Jami DelliFraine, Ebbin Dotson, Carolyn Watts and Karen Love

Community health clinics serving the poor and underserved are geographically expanding due to changes in U.S. health care policy. This paper describes the experience of a…

Abstract

Purpose

Community health clinics serving the poor and underserved are geographically expanding due to changes in U.S. health care policy. This paper describes the experience of a collaborative alliance of health care providers in a large metropolitan area who develop a conceptual and mathematical decision model to guide decisions on expanding its network of community health clinics.

Design/methodology/approach

Community stakeholders participated in a collaborative process that defined constructs they deemed important in guiding decisions on the location of community health clinics. This collaboration also defined key variables within each construct. Scores for variables within each construct were then totaled and weighted into a community-specific optimal space planning equation. This analysis relied entirely on secondary data available from published sources.

Findings

The model built from this collaboration revolved around the constructs of demand, sustainability, and competition. It used publicly available data defining variables within each construct to arrive at an optimal location that maximized demand and sustainability and minimized competition.

Practical implications

This is a model that safety net clinic planners and community stakeholders can use to analyze demographic and utilization data to optimize capacity expansion to serve uninsured and Medicaid populations.

Originality/value

Communities can use this innovative model to develop a locally relevant clinic location-planning framework.

Details

Population Health Management in Health Care Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-197-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2014

Abstract

Details

Population Health Management in Health Care Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-197-8

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Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2015

Abstract

Details

International Best Practices in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-278-4

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2012

Abstract

Details

Annual Review of Health Care Management: Strategy and Policy Perspectives on Reforming Health Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-191-5

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Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2013

Abstract

Details

Leading in Health Care Organizations: Improving Safety, Satisfaction and Financial Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-633-0

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2014

Abstract

Details

Population Health Management in Health Care Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-197-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2014

Abstract

Details

Population Health Management in Health Care Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-197-8

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